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Future Shock

Columbia's Data Recorder being repaired: BY IMATION?!?!?!

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Discovered in east Texas on Wednesday, the recorder and its 9,400 feet of tape are stretched and broken in one spot but otherwise in good condition, said NASA spokesman James Hartsfield. 

"Right now, the potential for there to be data available to us looks promising," he said. 

The recorder -- potentially the most significant piece of debris found yet -- is in the laboratory of a Minnesota company that specializes in magnetic data storage, and its tape is being painstakingly cleaned 

The recorder was collecting data from about 800 sensors on the fuselage, wings, tail and engines, and measuring temperature, pressure, strain, vibration, acoustics and acceleration, Hartsfield said. 

Late Friday night, NASA shipped the recorder to Imation Corp. in Oakdale, Minnesota, a leading manufacturer of data storage tape with 50 years of experience.

IMATION, for Pete's sake? Do they really expect to get any data back? Have they ever USED an Imation diskette or CD-R? OMG, we'll never know what happened now...

Future Shock

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Imation is what used to be 3M - I'm not sure if they bought 3M or if 3M just changed their name, but 3M was Minnesota based, and as good as anyone in the media field. Remember you can't really compare the "manufactured by the lowest bidder" consumer treatment to corporate grade projects........

or not - this thread just caught my eye and i felt like responding :)

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NASA normally demands better than corperate grade equipment. More like military grade... 3M is still around, Imation may have been a spin-off durring the tech bubble...3M shareholders undoubtable made a killing.

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Consumer grade and military grade are two different things. But one would believe since this is a government investigation that this tape could be distrubuted to some techie somewhere in NSA or Army and you would be guarenteed quality control on the results.

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Well you've mentioned who would be bad choices to send the tape to; but who would you think are the best people to send the tape to assuming to want it back with maximum recovery?

BTW 3M = Minnesota Mining & Minerals, I think

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Just for the record, I used Imation diskettes almost exclusively for many years, because they were the only brand I tried that didn't fail on a regular basis.

So there.

Piyono

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Discovered in east Texas on Wednesday, the recorder and its 9,400 feet of tape are stretched and broken in one spot but otherwise in good condition, said NASA spokesman James Hartsfield. 

"Right now, the potential for there to be data available to us looks promising," he said. 

The recorder -- potentially the most significant piece of debris found yet -- is in the laboratory of a Minnesota company that specializes in magnetic data storage, and its tape is being painstakingly cleaned 

The recorder was collecting data from about 800 sensors on the fuselage, wings, tail and engines, and measuring temperature, pressure, strain, vibration, acoustics and acceleration, Hartsfield said. 

Late Friday night, NASA shipped the recorder to Imation Corp. in Oakdale, Minnesota, a leading manufacturer of data storage tape with 50 years of experience.

IMATION, for Pete's sake? Do they really expect to get any data back? Have they ever USED an Imation diskette or CD-R? OMG, we'll never know what happened now...

Future Shock

Well, back when they were still 3M, I used some of their 3.5" disks in my CAD class. After a couple terms, when my class was over, I decided to torture one of the disks and see how much it could take. First: The disk was about 90% full, with a single AutoCAD drawing (CAD drawings are particularly susceptible to data corruption, as a single bad bit can make one of your lines to wacky.)

First, I tried a magnet. I just waved it over my home stereo's loudspeaker. No loss.

Then I tried a magnet from a 5.25" hard drive (if you've ever disassembled an older hard drive, you'll know how powerful those magnets are,) no loss.

Then I removed the actual disk media and dunked it in water, oil, and a few other things, after it was completely clean and dry, I put it back in, no loss.

Then, I took a pocket knife and scraped some of the coating off the disk media. I thought for certain this would do it. No loss.

I baked it, no loss.

I crumpled the media, ironed it flat again. No loss.

Finally, I poked a hole in it with a pin. Bingo! Still readable, but the drawing had a 'funky line' in it.

Then I microwaved it, which put un-ironable wavyness in, and it was beyond recovery.

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