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zeeon

Utility that detects AGP/PCI frequency

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Do u know any program that can detect the PCI/AGP clock frequency?

Tried with Sandra, but can only get the FSB frequency.

Got an ASUS P4B266SE motherboard. Based on Intel 845D chipset. Do u know what AGP/PCI divider this mobo supports? Planning on going for 150/166 MHz FSB, but worried about AGP/PCI frequencies.

Thanks.

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Hi Occupant 2,

I don't have any indication as to what the PCI/AGP ratio gets set in the BIOS.

I only have the FSB speeds.

So I'll need a software that'll measure that. I don't want to buy those devices that go into a PCI card and give you the exact reading.

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if you only have fsb speeds in your bios, what leads you to believe that your agp/pci isn't a standard 66/33?

most limited bios' don't allow overclocking of this sort of thing. i guess it leads us to the question, why are you doing this?

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Hi Occupant 2,

I don't have any indication as to what the PCI/AGP ratio gets set in the BIOS.

I only have the FSB speeds.

So I'll need a software that'll measure that. I don't want to buy those devices that go into a PCI card and give you the exact reading.

I had the P4S533, and Iam sure that in the voltage/clock req. area of the bios, it showed the pci/agp clocks and let you set them. The motherboard I upgraded to, (Gigabyte) 8INXP does for sure.

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sandra can read the agp/pci frequencies. look in the information modules/mainboard information and roll down untill you find the desired frequencies.

i have sandra 2002 professional installed.

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Sandra doesn't accurately show PCI/AGP. It guesses it. There are no software solutions that show PCI/AGP speed. You need an ocilliscope or one of those PC Geiger panels. That'll tell you what you want to know.

I had a P4B266 but I can't for the life of me remember if you can lock the PCI/AGP at various FSBs.

EDIT - I just remembered!!! There's a setting in the BIOS called "Turbo 1" and "Turbo 2". Turbo 1 locks the PCI/AGP at 37/74Mhz and Turbo 2 locks it at (maybe, nobody seems to know for sure) 40/80Mhz. I always ran my board at "Turbo 1" and never had any trouble. Fastest I ever had it was 145-ish FSB. This was with an early 1.8A last February.

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Thanks all of you.

Planning to get a C1 step 2.4 GHz Pentium 4 Processor with 133 FSB, and only way to get it upto 2.7 GHz or 3 GHz is to up the FSB to 155 or 166 MHz.

If my AGP PCI is locked at 33/66 MHz, that Cool. But if it's not, then AGP/PCI will be quite high at 166 MHz FSB with 1/4 PCI divider and 1/2 AGP divider.

Only way I can find out it seems is to try it out and see if its stable.

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I think the only accurate way to find the bus speeds is to find the clock generator chip on your motherboard, then go to the chip manufacturer's website and get the spec. sheet. This will tell you want FSB and PCI speed combinations are available.

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Thanks all of you.

Planning to get a C1 step 2.4 GHz Pentium 4 Processor with 133 FSB, and only way to get it upto 2.7 GHz or 3 GHz is to up the FSB to 155 or 166 MHz.

If my AGP PCI is locked at 33/66 MHz, that Cool. But if it's not, then AGP/PCI will be quite high at 166 MHz FSB with 1/4 PCI divider and 1/2 AGP divider.

Only way I can find out it seems is to try it out and see if its stable.

As I noted in my post above, if you use the "Turbo 1" setting in your P4B266's BIOS your PCI/AGP will be locked at 37/74Mhz. You won't have to worry about it. Search the forums at HardOCP or Anandtech or Asusboards from back before May/June 2002 and you'll find all kinds of discussion about the "Turbo 1" locking feature. It's not a myth, it does exist.

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Hi Ralf Hutter,

Thanks for the info. I'll try with that as soon as I get the CPU. 37/74 shouldn't be too much of a strain on PCi/AGP. I've run my old BX board higher.

BTW, do u have any experience OCing a C1 P4? I'm currently using a B0 step 1.8A @ 2.4 GHz.

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I run my C1 (2.66) at 150FSB. That gives me 3.0Ghz and DDR400 with my RAM running at 3:4. I haven't tried any higher than that. *Most* people seem to get at least 150FSB, if not better with the 2.4.

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Hi RH,

How many degrees does the alpha + Panaflo shave off from stock cooling readings?

Panaflo should be easier on the ears, as it's renowned for its quiteness.

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How many degrees does the alpha + Panaflo shave off from stock cooling readings?

google. almost all p4 hsf reviews have comparisons against the retail hsf

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Hi RH,

How many degrees does the alpha + Panaflo shave off from stock cooling readings?

Panaflo should be easier on the ears, as it's renowned for its quiteness.

Hardly any, but it is much quieter than the stock HSF. If you were running something like a 32cfm Sunon or an M1A Panaflo the noise would be comparable to the stock HSF but you'd get maybe 5-7°C cooler at full load than the stock HSF.

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while there's nothing stopping someone from making a plastic clip to attach to the retail hs the same way the retail fan does, i'm not aware of any that exist

if you're doing this only to reduce noise, poke around heatsinkfactory.com and see what cheaper things you can pair with a low-output panaflo 80mm fan

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Ya, each chip is different; if I get a good chip from a good batch.

Overclockers.com database has quite a few guys htting 2700+, and even 3 GHz.

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