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HisMajestyTheKing

Dell sucks

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try opening a newer dimension.  you'd be absolutely high to say that it was anything less than the most accessible case you'd ever worked with.  way better than the lian-li i'm using personally.
The most accessable case I've worked with is the PowerMac G4 case. Of course, the case doesn't matter since most Apple hardware is proprietary...

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QWERTY rocks....
I disagree here. QWERTY is nice in that it is common, but I believe the keys are in an absolutely terrible order. I have heard that they were designed specifically to slow typing, so as to prevent the impact arms of mechanical keyboards from colliding due to fast typists, but I haven't heard that confirmed. In any case, I would think an efficient keyboard design would have the most commonly used third of the keys in home row, the second most commonmy used on the row below that, and the third most on the row above the home row. It would also be very nice if curly braces and double quotation marks didn't require the shift key oto be pressed. I don't know if there is a logical place to put number keys, but having them in a keypad closer to home row sounds logical, though I haven't really thought about it much. I do like the positioning of the function keys and page-up/page-down/insert/, etc, but considering the common uses of "end" and "home" I would think them better placed horizontally rather than vertically (though some keyboards probably do this). This is all just my opinion of what a good keyboard would be, but I would probablynot switch to such a keyboard simply because nearly everyone else in the U.S. uses a "standard" QWERTY.

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QWERTY rocks....
I disagree here. QWERTY is nice in that it is common, but I believe the keys are in an absolutely terrible order. I have heard that they were designed specifically to slow typing, so as to prevent the impact arms of mechanical keyboards from colliding due to fast typists, but I haven't heard that confirmed. In any case, I would think an efficient keyboard design would have the most commonly used third of the keys in home row, the second most commonmy used on the row below that, and the third most on the row above the home row. It would also be very nice if curly braces and double quotation marks didn't require the shift key oto be pressed. I don't know if there is a logical place to put number keys, but having them in a keypad closer to home row sounds logical, though I haven't really thought about it much. I do like the positioning of the function keys and page-up/page-down/insert/, etc, but considering the common uses of "end" and "home" I would think them better placed horizontally rather than vertically (though some keyboards probably do this). This is all just my opinion of what a good keyboard would be, but I would probablynot switch to such a keyboard simply because nearly everyone else in the U.S. uses a "standard" QWERTY.

Nope, you are correct. The key layout on the Qwerty keyboard is designed to slow you down so that a mechanical typewriter wouldnt jam...

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Nope, you are correct. The key layout on the Qwerty keyboard is designed to slow you down so that a mechanical typewriter wouldnt jam...
Do you know of a source which can verify this, such as a design document or patent?

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Nope, you are correct. The key layout on the Qwerty keyboard is designed to slow you down so that a mechanical typewriter wouldnt jam...
Do you know of a source which can verify this, such as a design document or patent?

try:

http://home.earthlink.net/~dcrehr/myths.html

I saw it on a CBC program talking about early office automations...

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Amongst brand name manufacturers they are okay, but then again I would never buy any of those even for a company. They are selling overpriced P4's with 128MB of RAM. :oops: That's reason enough to call them bad names and laugh at the sales clerks trying to pimp them out.

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Amongst brand name manufacturers they are okay, but then again I would never buy any of those even for a company. They are selling overpriced P4's with 128MB of RAM.  :oops:  That's reason enough to call them bad names and laugh at the sales clerks trying to pimp them out.

What WOULD you buy for a company then? Clones?? :D

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What you refer to as clones are what more and more people see as real PC's. 8)

All the company needs is a knowledgeable staff member and they can get specific hardware according to their needs rather than standard model. More and more companies plan to handle some of the tech support internally too nowadays, so support deals with brand name manufacturers gets less important too. Like if those deals were ever good for the companies too. :roll:

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You MUST be kidding. Clones are unsuitable office machines for several reasons. They're only good for use at home or when one needs a very specific configuration.

-no standards: on a brand machine you have a 3-year warranty on the entire thing; with a clone you get different warranties on each component, each with another manufacturer. Nightmare.

-there is no support on clones while there is very good support on brand name machines

-not everyone needs or can afford on-site tech support

Only when you have very knowledgeable on-site support MAY clone PC's be a good solution. Still, I wouldn't recomend it to anyone because there simply aren't enough good reasons to do so. Next thing you'll be saying clone servers are a good thing as well 8O

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I don't even understand the use of the word clone in the year of 2002. There is nothing to clone, really, but rather the brand name manufacturers try hard to seem like they have something original going on. When they do it's more often than not something that is original in a bad way.

Servers are different though, but not so because of the hardware but rather the very special support deals where it makes more sense to pay big buck for something as vital as a server. Regardless of the hardware itself.

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Just to clarify a bit, I would not suggest that a medium size company would put the PC's together themselves, but get them from a "normal" supplier rather than brand name toting companies pimping overpriced IBM(or whatever) machines that come attached with overcharged bills for oftenly not needed support. It's no problem getting at least a two year warranty on the whole system that way. A year more or less means little for a regular office workstation and can be well worth it to buy a couple of extra backup systems rather than signing on with the regular bloodsucking support deals.

More and more companies has started to realise this during the last few years, that having some on site support can greatly reduce the need to hire outside firms for day-to-day support or workstation maintenance, and cut response delays at the same time. Of course I'm not talking about corporate servers, though many larger companies that tend to be ones having that should be able to set up their own tech section that handles it more cost effectively than the major brand name suppliers anyway. There's probably lots of laid off staff to hire from those companies anyway these days. There are things well suited for outsourcing these days but some services has started to trickle in the other direction.

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You MUST be kidding.  Clones are unsuitable office machines for several reasons.  They're only good for use at home or when one needs a very specific configuration.

-no standards: on a brand machine you have a 3-year warranty on the entire thing; with a clone you get different warranties on each component, each with another manufacturer.  Nightmare.

-there is no support on clones while there is very good support on brand name machines

-not everyone needs or can afford on-site tech support

Only when you have very knowledgeable on-site support MAY clone PC's be a good solution.  Still, I wouldn't recomend it to anyone because there simply aren't enough good reasons to do so.  Next thing you'll be saying clone servers are a good thing as well  8O

Not true at all, we allow our customers to totally customize the PCs, if stability is king, intel chipsets, or a gamer gets an sis chipset. (P4) We can make any config as stable as any tier1 clone, and faster. (simply because we dont allow customers to select crippled configs (or at least not too crippled))

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Quote you:

"The RAID controller appears to be an U2W 32-bit thing !!! PERC3/SC. One would expect at least an U160 controller when using U160 disks...

"

They do that all the time, but if "he who ordered the machine would have asked another controller card in his Dell, he would have had it".

And the service of Dell Europe "sucks" bigtime. Very true.

Sorry Russo "QWERTY rocks.... " i disagree here.

François

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QUOTE]Do you know of a source which can verify this, such as a design document or patent?

Sivar, that's something I heard many years ago as well. It appeared that with different keyboards, the metal that would rise (on an old typewriter) would bunch up together as folks typed faster and faster. Turns out that's a myth (if you believe what's below)

http://home.earthlink.net/~dcrehr/myths.html

of course, here it says it WAS to slow you down. I thought the internet was always right?!

http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~jedwards/Chri...ris/Dvorak.html

thanks for questioning something I believed to be true. Now please don't ask me to prove to you my God exists. Hope you get to meet him someday.

Sean

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I have had great experience with dell computers.

I sat up one poweredge 1400sc for about a year ago, and it runs great, good performance, great upgradability, and best of all the price!

I have also put up around 10-15 dell dimensions (from xps r350) to 4550, and none of them have failed me yet. Even my old netplex 433 is running 24/7 (been up for over 300 days now).

The last year I have also been configuring a few inspiron notebooks, although the "feeling" to it feels el cheapo, it does work well and I havent had many problems with the 10 I configured. I had a few problems with one of them, around 10 pixels were dead. I called dell and two days later they were on my door and changed it! Even though it was sold with a 1 year CAR warranty.

Another small thing that happened for a year ago was that the mbr record became corrupted. The company I work for called dell before me, and a tech was on its way when I came out and fixed it.

(This company havent bought more than around 5-7 computers from dell within the past two years so it isn't a big customer).

Although I know several people that have had a few problems with the dell customerservice, I have had great experience. This is btw in Norway. And the support site is alot better here than in the US.

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you know what goes in it and get what you want for a much better price. dell is crap they have turned into compaq. ibm is quilty at a price. you all sound smart enough to just put your own servers together from scratch????

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you know what goes in it and get what you want for a much better price. dell is crap they have turned into compaq. ibm is quilty at a price. you all sound smart enough to just put your own servers together from scratch????

Scroll up. :)

You MUST be kidding.  Clones are unsuitable office machines for several reasons.  They're only good for use at home or when one needs a very specific configuration.

-no standards: on a brand machine you have a 3-year warranty on the entire thing; with a clone you get different warranties on each component, each with another manufacturer.  Nightmare.

-there is no support on clones while there is very good support on brand name machines

-not everyone needs or can afford on-site tech support

Only when you have very knowledgeable on-site support MAY clone PC's be a good solution.  Still, I wouldn't recomend it to anyone because there simply aren't enough good reasons to do so.  Next thing you'll be saying clone servers are a good thing as well  8O

The same applies doubly so with servers.

While I agree that Dell's servers aren't the best, those I have used (not too many, maybe 5 models) are good enough (which, for a server, means quite good) and the prices are amazing. However, this thread seems to further confirm that Dell isn't a great choice outside of the U.S. and perhaps England.

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I feel that many people here seme to think that a reliable system means it must be stable nd that's it. Well, that's only where it begins. Reliable also means good support, long warranty (3 years is nice, you can often get 5 years with large manufacturers), availability of standard hardware for a period longer than a mere 6 months. IBM fr example has certain series where the hardware config doesn't change for a year (except perhaps another CPU, more RAM, larger disk but anything that needs drivers remains the same).

It's nearly impossible to do this with clone machines.

To me a clone is anything not made by a large OEM (IBM, Dell, Compaq, ...). Clones are fine for home use but impractical for businesses. I also don't understand why many people here seem to think that speed is king.

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availability of standard hardware for a period longer than a mere 6 months.

For me that has only been a problem with brand name computers, never ever with standard PC's.

I also don't understand why many people here seem to think that speed is king.

And neither price/performance I gyess. Like paying what things are worth rather than for being able to say to the incompetent management of a firm that "yes, they are all IBM-PC's like in the commersials". You also seem to link standard PC's to a "no-support" situation. Well that's just plain wrong. Try it sometime and step out of those IBM shoes. :)

About that typewriter myth it helps to see through it if one has really used one of those archaic devices. When I did they as good as only got stuck when accidentally pressing the wrong key instead of how it was intended by the qwerty standard, and so typing could be done as fast as possible. And in the end even if there was another standard that was faster in theory it wouldn't matter that much to me because switching would probably make my typing much slower for many months. Hell, even getting used to these windows-keys took quite a while. :)

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Oh come one. What's theproduct life of most hardware typically used in a clone? Most things become difficult to get after about 6 to 9 months. I KNOW I can still have basically the same IBM NetVista I buy now this time next year. Anything I need a driver for will be the same, making it quite easy to slap on the image I made last month.

Price/performance you say. It all depends on what you expect to get for a certain price :) Support on clone PC's is non-existent unless you expect me to trust a small shop to keep 500 machines running 3 years on end without losing lots of time checking what mainboard is used, which vidcard, which soundcard, ...

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What's theproduct life of most hardware typically used in a clone?  Most things become difficult to get after about 6 to 9 months.

A wild exaggeration, really. You must know that too. I'll refrain from commenting further on it, but have a good life. :)

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