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Davin

Davin: Restless Impressionable Idiot Seeking Adventure

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Davin,

Please go to Amazon and buy "The Ulimate Adventure Sourcebook". I have an older copy, and it is just a plethora of great, stimulating things to do, most of which have a good measure of physical effort and some element of risk. They have pricing, recommened places and outfitters, etc. When I bought mine I was really surprised at some of the options available.

Now if you ask me how many recommendations from the book I have tried, all I can say is that I took up skiing seriously around that time, which when you start at 30 and are afraid of heights is all the adventure I could handle...and money I had to spend...

Future Shock

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Davin, It sounds like you do interesting things at work but find that they are not rewarding.

If this is the case, try looking for something for ways to give back to your community. Anything from Habitat for Humanity, a Community Kitchen to open source software to short-term missionary trips.

OTOH, Motorcycling is fun. You will get much out of the course. More than likely you will be learning on 250s. You should not be too concerned about an 1150. What you might should be concerned about is the standover height. The GS is a tall bike. If you are into cruising, as I am, you should look into the R100R. The RT has more fairing but also costs more and the RS is the "sport" version. I have a 1970 R75/5. No fairing.

Also be aware that the bikes you will be taking the course on will have some of the controls(lights,blinkers) in a different place than on BMWs. In my case they were vastly different.

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Perhaps you could draw/have drawn some inspiration from this man and his motorcycle?

robert-p.jpg

pirsigbike.jpg

If you haven't already, read Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

Even if it doesn't immediately address the issues you're facing, it's a heck of a good read.

Piyono

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Perhaps you could draw/have drawn some inspiration from this man and his motorcycle?

robert-p.jpg

pirsigbike.jpg

If you haven't already, read Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

Even if it doesn't immediately address the issues you're facing, it's a heck of a good read.

Piyono

This thread caught my attention today. Unfortunately, I have been too busy to follow the flurry of posts in the different fora. I cannot imagine how some of you manage to post as often as you do.

But here’s what I wanted to say:

For those of you that enjoy “philosophical novels”, the book Piyono recommended is a wonderful book as is Pirsig's very original follow-up: “Lila, an Inquiry into Morals.”

A boat ride carries Phaedrus, the lead narrator and character in both books, in this second exploration of the moral order. This second book might be of interest to the gentleman who enjoys traveling on a boat by himself, supercaff, I believe, is his name.

Anyway, I have to run.

Best to all of you people.

Regards,

Yuyo

Ps: Before or after reader Pirsig, depending on your taste, it might be fun to read up on the Aristotelian concept of “good” and one of Plato’s lesser known writings: “Phaedrus and Letters VII and VIII”. Enjoy.

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I read Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. It was a great read and I think it planted an initial seed because it was in reading that book that I initially developed appreciation for the ride and for the deep philosophies within. I hope to capture some of that in my own experience. Reading the book is one thing... :wink:

I haven't been totally forthright... it's more than just a bored fool needing some crazy adventure. I've had a very trying last couple of years in my personal life that I'm not going to go into detail here. I've been the strong one (pretended anyway) but I've never taken the time to heal my self. Now that life has gotten somewhat "still" I am haunted by unreconciled experiences from my past. I'm looking for adventure and I need escape. There are probably a handful of people on this BBS who know what I'm talking about. I'm proud of myself for not going into a self-destructive tailspin, attempting suicide and/or abusing substances, etc (what I call "the easy way out"). Instead I focused all my energies on leading by example, getting my own life back on track and delving (escaping) back into being a computer geek. So far, so good, but it's beginning to wear thin (I'm at a palteau). I'm feeling more and more compelled to do something radical. Drastically changing occupations, embarking on an arduous journey.... something.

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I haven't been totally forthright...  it's more than just a bored fool needing some crazy adventure.  I've had a very trying last couple of years in my personal life that I'm not going to go into detail here.  I've been the strong one (pretended anyway) but I've never taken the time to heal my self.  Now that life has gotten somewhat "still" I am haunted by unreconciled experiences from my past.  I'm looking for adventure and I need escape.  There are probably a handful of people on this BBS who know what I'm talking about.  I'm proud of myself for not going into a self-destructive tailspin, attempting suicide and/or abusing substances, etc (what I call "the easy way out").  Instead I focused all my energies on leading by example, getting my own life back on track and delving (escaping) back into being a computer geek.  So far, so good, but it's beginning to wear thin (I'm at a palteau).  I'm feeling more and more compelled to do something radical.  Drastically changing occupations, embarking on an arduous journey....  something.

I know exactly how you feel. I know I need a change from my current situation, but I'm not sure what it is yet. Unfortunately, I don't have the means to supports myself for an extended adventure. I've been leaning towards a move to someplace else and starting over, but I don't for several reasons. I have a feeling there are many in this world in the same situation.

Steve

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It seems to me that by trekking through cyclical diversions brought on by a need to do something, a man wastes his life away. These physical activities beyond the everyday norm only divert attention away from the restless feeling, which returns in some form or another eventually. At one unavoidable point there is no longer an opportunity to act out radically, and his moral-psychological-physical justification for life remains forever unfulfilled.

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It seems to me that by trekking through cyclical diversions brought on by a need to do something, a man wastes his life away. These physical activities beyond the everyday norm only divert attention away from the restless feeling, which returns in some form or another eventually. At one unavoidable point there is no longer an opportunity to act out radically, and his moral-psychological-physical justification for life remains forever unfulfilled.

To quote Pirsig, "Zen is the "spirit of the valley," not the mountain. The only Zen you find on the tops of moutains is the Zen you bring up there."

But sometimes, you need to get to the top of the mountain to realize just this. And getting some air in your lugs and face is not a bad thing...

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Davin, I feel the same way.

I have an IT job, with a not-that-great salary. I'm paying off my car, and am also single. I'm 26.

Most days I feel like going "Sod it" and go get a job digging roads or doing landscape gardening. Both of which I've done in the past, and both I enjoyed. I'm going to stick at this job though - it's a small company (5 employees), and I get on really well with one of the directors.

If the IT industry goes to stinker (which it probably will), we're going to start a landscaping business :)

Anyway, good luck with whatever you decide. I wish I had the balls to dump this sorry ass job.

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I quit my job one afternoon, went to expedia, bought a pair of tickets to France for three weeks, and went there with my girlfriend. I didn't speak a lick of French, had only two days to pack and prepare, but we had a great time. We backpacked, hitchhiked, slept outside, slept at youth hostels, slept at 5-star hotels, saw movies in languages we didn't understand, and enjoyed day after day of amazing bread and wine.

When I came back, I started looking for a job and got an offer pretty quick. More so than I thought I would. My new boss later told me, "you seemed so happy and confident when we first met." I had lunch with my team from my old job and they all remarked about how I was smiling for the first time in years. I don't know what it was, but after years of same-old-same-old, it was a real load off my back to throw away the old benchmarks and go do something completely different. Now, the two of us travel someplace new every six months (Greece was next, equally impromptu, and we're shooting for Iceland on some random stretch of days in the spring) and between those and all the other day-to-day things I experienced this year (rollerblading, bondage clubs, learning to ride a motorcycle, getting a tattoo, starting a LLC if only on paper, becoming an EMT, etc.) life suddenly seems far more interesting than it did before. And because I'm happier about it, I seem to put in a better effort at my same-old-same-old job.

This formula could well have been disaster for me; I can see it playing out as follows: I travel abroad, have a miserable time, come back, and am unemployed for the next twelve months. It didn't turn out that way, but it could have. So, that risk would be the caveat. Personally, if I had to do it all over again, I'd take that risk though.

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Just don't forget us here in the forums Davin... :?

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Davin,

After I ended a rather destructive relationship about a year ago, I too felt the need to escape and get a better perspective on life...

I went to SE Asia for nearly 4 months. Thailand, Nepal, Indonesia, Singapore, and many other places. The most chalenging/rewarding thing was to trek the Annapurna mountain range for 30 days. 350 miles, from 300ft to over 20,000ft and back. Traveling light and enjoying some of the most breathtaking views on earth.

I have been planning on returning and doing the trip again, as it was the best time of my life. Just as soon as I find 1 1/2 months and about $3000 (it's really cheap there).

For anyone looking to get some perspective (and some spiritual restfulness) I'd highly reccomend it.

Davin, If you're interested let me know and I'll dig up my travel notes.

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Sorry, also bear in mind that I know nothing of any of the languages there and traveled ALONE (meeting people on and off along the way). I am not in that great a shape (but was when I returned)

This is something that anyone who is healthy and motivated can do.

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Ah, there's the rub...and the reward.

You wouldn't be able to get a message to or from anyone even if your life depended on it (unless you brought your own sat-phone, but that misses the point).

I plan on doing the whole thing in 40 days....not all that long, really.

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