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Kennyshin

VDSL getting very popular in South Korea

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KT (Korea Telecom) plans to have 400,000 subscribers by the end of 2003. Other companies like Thrunet, DACOM, Hanaro Telecom, and a few others also have been rapidly switching from Cable/ADSL to VDSL.

The average speed is 10Mbps for simultaneous upload and download which is much slower than the fastest version of Entopia and eValley but still a lot better than ADSL and HFC Cable.

http://www.dt.co.kr/view04.html?gisaid=200...102010351673007 (Link to Digital Time news report of South Korea, in Korean.)

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I'm curious, do you only get such speeds when connecting to loacal Korean servers or do you also get it to the USA/Europe? What is the Net connectivity to other countries like?

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What does the V stand for?  How does it differ from ADSL?

VDSL stands for Very high bit-rate DSL. Here you can read all about VDSL and here you get a nice overview of all xDSL kinds.[/url]

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Thanks for the info. VDSL sounds great as long as your telecomm company has fiber into your neighborhood. I wonder how it compares to RCN's megaband. They run their own wire (not sure which kind, copper or fiber) into your neighborhood. Then they give you tv, voice, and data all over the same line. They are starting to offer video on demand services too. The data is through a cable modem.

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that's what we have here in kansas city... fiber to your neighborhood then copper after that... $40 a month for 2MBit down 384k up.

Sprint will also do fiber to your house(dynamic phone lines and 10MBit internet), but that is a bit more than I'd like to spend... plus it all comes as a package deal and I would not be using some of the features.

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US$20 for 10Mbps Up/Down VDSL here in South Korea. Nearly the same for ADSL, cable, and 80Mbps Entopia (KT service - fiber + LAN).

My home ADSL line is serviced by KT. 8Mbps download, 0.8Mbps upload.

Pradeep,

There's no limit whether it's domestic or overseas. Any VDSL or Entopia user can download 100GB to 1TB and upload 25GB to 100GB everyday. That's downloading up to 365TB and uploading up to 36.5TB in a year. Among Entopia users, sharing multiple 100 hours HDTV-captured MPEG-2 files in 1920x1080 resolution will not sound so difficult though Blu-ray HD-DVD is not yet commercially available.

So far, about 70% of households in South Korea have at least ADSL or cable. The minimum speed (for ADSL economy version) is 2Mbps up and 800Kbps down.

What's significant is millions in South Korea alone will be able to send 1 to 10 megabytes of data per second. Almost for free in most cases.

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So far, about 70% of households in South Korea have at least ADSL or cable. The minimum speed (for ADSL economy version) is 2Mbps up and 800Kbps down.

=>

So far, about 70% of households in South Korea have at least ADSL or cable. The minimum speed (for ADSL economy version) is 2Mbps down and 800Kbps up.

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Pradeep,

There's no limit whether it's domestic or overseas. Any VDSL or Entopia user can download 100GB to 1TB and upload 25GB to 100GB everyday. That's downloading up to 365TB and uploading up to 36.5TB in a year. Among Entopia users, sharing multiple 100 hours HDTV-captured MPEG-2 files in 1920x1080 resolution will not sound so difficult though Blu-ray HD-DVD is not yet commercially available.

So far, about 70% of households in South Korea have at least ADSL or cable. The minimum speed (for ADSL economy version) is 2Mbps up and 800Kbps down.

What's significant is millions in South Korea alone will be able to send 1 to 10 megabytes of data per second. Almost for free in most cases.

Wow, that is certainly very impressive. In reference to limits, I was wondering what kind of download speeds you get from US based servers. Certainly it looks like South Korea has the best and cheapest broadband Net access in the world.

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Pradeep,

There's no limit whether it's domestic or overseas. Any VDSL or Entopia user can download 100GB to 1TB and upload 25GB to 100GB everyday. That's downloading up to 365TB and uploading up to 36.5TB in a year. Among Entopia users, sharing multiple 100 hours HDTV-captured MPEG-2 files in 1920x1080 resolution will not sound so difficult though Blu-ray HD-DVD is not yet commercially available.

So far, about 70% of households in South Korea have at least ADSL or cable. The minimum speed (for ADSL economy version) is 2Mbps up and 800Kbps down.

What's significant is millions in South Korea alone will be able to send 1 to 10 megabytes of data per second. Almost for free in most cases.

Wow, that is certainly very impressive. In reference to limits, I was wondering what kind of download speeds you get from US based servers. Certainly it looks like South Korea has the best and cheapest broadband Net access in the world.

From what I have read from Impress and other Japanese sites, it's much cheaper in Japan than in South Korea.

I do feel strongly that this is something more of a national competition between Japan and South Korea. The Ministry of Information and Telecommunication of South Korea does interfere and control everything about the NET here though which is nearly impossible even to imagine in the US or Europe. Many years ago, the national model was that of Singapore. In my opinion, I believe that Japan is still much ahead of South Korea in everything. (Now millions of South Koreans try to master the Japanese language just to communicate with Japanese mainly because 99+ percent of the Japanese nationals acknowledge only Japanese, the language.)

Bandwidth IS important even though much of it is used for piracy and other sorts of crimes. For example, KBench site has millions of unique viewers and members that are practically 100% South Korean nationals. They can all upload up to 200KB JPG files to KBench server when they post anything in KBench community forum boards. This degree of generous service attracts and keeps more people visiting and is also good for profitability.

I visit CNET download and other US-based servers sometimes to download sharewares and other sorts of files but since the country has primarily underseas cables connecting with other countries and continents, the overseas bandwidth IS limited when there are millions of South Korean computers visiting overseas servers. Locally, the speed is often unlimited meaning that it depends on what the client's download bandwidth is. Internationally, it depends on what the server's upload bandwidth is per connection and most US-based servers are relatively very slow.

One of my friends, a former computer dealer, is going to move to Auckland, New Zealand next year and he's going to open an Internet cafe there mainly for South Korean immigrants and students (I heard there are around 30,000 South Koreans in the small city and most young South Korean males are extremely addicted to online gaming.) He's not good at reading English so I did some research for him, which is why I joined OCNZ forum, too. The national telecom company in NZ charges additional money per every MB after the given quota...? Sounds crazy to people here who are not accustomed to situations overseas.

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Korea.com Communications (formerly part of Thrunet.com, the first broadband company in South Korea) first began commercial DivX DVD-quality VOD service a few months ago. Much cheaper than DVD considering most Japanese animation DVD titles cost over US$50 per disc. I don't know how much Korea.com pays the movie and animation companies for the source.

Only a few years ago, the KT CEO, a government-owned telecommunications monopoly, was another former ROK Army general.

For audio and video files, I usually (still) use Windows Media Player v6.4 English version though I also have Windows Media Player 9.00.00.2903 installed. WMA 9 VBR under 100Kbps data rate sounds good enough to me for most music.

http://www.watch.impress.co.jp/internet/ww.../1011/wmvod.htm

http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/press/2...eaTelecomPR.asp

KT Becomes First Telecom in the World To Deploy Microsoft Windows Media 9 Series

Largest Telecom Provider in Korea Launches HomeMedia Video-On-Demand Service To Its 4.4 Million Broadband Internet Users, Offering Over 2,000 Movies And Broadcast TV Programming

REDMOND, Wash., and SEOUL, South Korea -- Oct. 9, 2002 -- Microsoft Corp. and KT (Korea Telecom), the largest telecom provider in Korea, today announced that KT is the first telecommunications operator in the world to deploy Microsoft® Windows Media® 9 Series. KT is using Windows Media 9 Series to power its new broadband video-on-demand service called HomeMedia, which launches today. KT's HomeMedia service will use key innovations of the new Windows Media 9 Series to deliver over 2,000 on-demand movies and television programming, from the leading Korean movie studios and the leading national television networks, to its 4.4 million broadband Internet users. HomeMedia also will be the first service in the world designed to connect the PC to the television in the living room with a wireless connection using Windows Media 9 Series. This new service demonstrates how the PC is rapidly transforming into a mainstream entertainment device for the home.

...

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South Korea seems to be the country with most "broadband" users per capita in the world. Here in norway there is around 200 000 with adsl and around 50 000 with cable. Fortunatly for me as a student I got a whopping 100mbit line. Although we are not alone on the internet line there are several gigabit fibres out of the student village.

you could see most of the network from here: www.nav.ntnu.no/vlanPlot/

Just click wherever you want to get more details. Just note that there are over 15 000 computers on that network.

I have had downloads from servers in norway, sweden, denemark and finland around 6-7MB/s. And locally with the local DC hub up to around 9MB/s. It's just so great to see 700MB beeing downloaded within 3 minutes. Although there are very few sites I can get that kind of speed from.

Im really not looking forward to moving out from here, and getting a 0,384Mbit adsl line, or a 56,6 og 64kbit modem or isdn :( (perhaps I will be a student till I get OLD?).

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China is also ambitiously making VDSL standard. China plans to have 3 million VDSL subscribers by the end of 2003 according to a local (Seoul-based) newspaper. That's a negligible number considering China has 1,300 million people while South Korea has only 50 million.

VDSL and fibre-based home Internet seems to help people to switch (from 100Mbps) to Gigabit LAN as well.

Personally, the most interesting application for 10+Mbps home Internet would be HD-quality VOD service.

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Largest service provider: Korea Telecom (KT)

Second largest: Hanaro Telecom

Third: Thrunet

Korea Telecom's fibre home internet product is called Entopia.

Hanaro Telecom => eValley

Basically fibre + LAN at large-scale apartment complex.

Most Entopia and eValley users enjoy this degree of download and upload speed. A few times faster than VDSL.

Entopia and eValley are usually installed at rich, new and highly concentrated apartment neighborhoods while VDSL is targeted for more popular and traditional apartment buildings.

VDSL, Entopia, and eValley, they all cost around $20-$30 a month.

speed.JPG

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Well isn't that swell!!!

We've got people in third world countries with access to VDSL, while I've been patiently waiting with 56K for the last FIVE YEARS in my little pudunk village of SILICON VALLEY!!!!

WTF is wrong with this picture!?

:evil: :evil: :evil:

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I know a guy that has VDSL courtesy of Bellsouth in Atlanta. He gets 5Mb/s down, 3Mb/s up. I forget how much he said he pays, but it is very reasonable. I believe it is $75 a month. While not widely available in the US it is coming... at least to bellsouth country.

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Well isn't that swell!!!

We've got people in third world countries with access to VDSL, while I've been patiently waiting with 56K for the last FIVE YEARS in my little pudunk village of SILICON VALLEY!!!!

WTF is wrong with this picture!?

:evil:  :evil:  :evil:

Sorry, the guy who posted the picture has resized it to lower resolution.

The picture says 4+MB/s upload and 4+MB/s download for Hanaro Telecom's eValley home internet service. Tested and posted by a one of my friends in Seoul.

BTW, are South Korea and China really "third world" countries? If you see the world as divided into the first world, the second world, and the third world, they are. However, in terms of scientific and technological competition on a national scale throughout the millenia, who knows?

Some of the South Korean government officials chose Singapore as The Model in the 1980s and early 1990s. So they have tried to transform the entire country into a well-integrated network where everyone would have a fibre-grade 24x7 Internet access. South Korea has never been really a capitalistic system.

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Some people use .WAV instead of MP3 or OGG now. DVD MPEG-2 instead of converted MPEG-4. For most cases, the problem is the limited storage (HDD) on the part of forum servers and users, not the bandwidth. Sites like DCInside have millions of South Korean visitors with or without digital camera. They can post hundreds or even thousands of multi-MB hi-res photo on web forum boards everyday now. (The server space is usually free and almost unlimited.)

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I know a guy that has VDSL courtesy of Bellsouth in Atlanta.  He gets 5Mb/s down, 3Mb/s up.  I forget how much he said he pays, but it is very reasonable.  I believe it is $75 a month.  While not widely available in the US it is coming... at least to bellsouth country.

5Mbps downloand and 3Mbps upload for US$75 a month sounds very reasonable to me as well considering average US workers earn three to five thousand dollars a month. (In 2002, South Korean GNP per capita is about US$700 a month.)

HDSL, VDSL, PL and other new technologies were often mentioned in the late 1990s but only VDSL have become commercially available on a large-enough scale in the early 2000s in Seoul and other South Korean cities. Now VDSL has already escaped its initial experimental phase and is rapidly replacing cable and ADSL. The closest KT telephone office is located over 1 kilometer from my current home so VDSL's out of the question to me.

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If VDSL is limited to locations within one kilometre of an exchange, then it won't be replacing ADSL and cable anytime soon.

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If VDSL is limited to locations within one kilometre of an exchange, then it won't be replacing ADSL and cable anytime soon.

How many people are there within that one kilometer range? Where most people live (don't forget the most populated regions and cities in the world are not North America at all), it's thousands to hundreds of thousands. It may not replace ADSL and cable anytime soon in the US, but it IS replacing them pretty fast here.

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Damn, I wish I was living in korea. That very impressive. Canadian cable and dsl access are limited on the amount of traffic each month. Were only allowed 5-6gig download a month. They say they'll allow 15gigs or less. But we all know for people into video downloads that not enough. Does korea have a limit on the amount of traffic per month. Cause I think 1mbps connection is fine as long as the traffic was unlimited.

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Well isn't that swell!!!

We've got people in third world countries with access to VDSL, while I've been patiently waiting with 56K for the last FIVE YEARS in my little pudunk village of SILICON VALLEY!!!!

WTF is wrong with this picture!?

:evil:  :evil:  :evil:

Sorry, the guy who posted the picture has resized it to lower resolution.

The picture says 4+MB/s upload and 4+MB/s download for Hanaro Telecom's eValley home internet service. Tested and posted by a one of my friends in Seoul.

BTW, are South Korea and China really "third world" countries? If you see the world as divided into the first world, the second world, and the third world, they are. However, in terms of scientific and technological competition on a national scale throughout the millenia, who knows?

Some of the South Korean government officials chose Singapore as The Model in the 1980s and early 1990s. So they have tried to transform the entire country into a well-integrated network where everyone would have a fibre-grade 24x7 Internet access. South Korea has never been really a capitalistic system.

Sorry. The point I was trying to make was the fact that I have lived in the Silicon Valley for the last 30 years. On the way to work, I pass the headquarters of DOZENS of first tier multiglobal corporate empires! I live in the cradle of the technological universe. I live in the place where it all began, and make side trips during my lunch hour underneath the shadows of Intel and AMD! I reside in the so-called "capital" of the Silicon Valley, the grand mecca of all things technical.

Despite all of this, I have been patiently suffering on a 56K line for the last five years while untold millions enjoy their ultrahighspeed connections in places where livestock is still an accepted form of currency! High spped lines in China, India, hell, even Mississippi. :x

What do I need to do to get a DSL or Cable connection? Move to the Ozarks? It just makes me SICK! 8O

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