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LOST6200

Audio Card Needed!

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I need advice on buying a PCI sound card for recording to be done later this week. Since it is a one-time project (voice narration), I don't want to spend more than $150-200. Please don't even mention the "CR" word.

TIA

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Philips Acoustic Edge. They cost around $50.

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Where does one find these Philips cards? I haven't seen them anywhere here in Belgium. Product page at Philips anyone...?

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I like the Hercules Gamesurround Fortissimo II as well, about $50 US, whatever that is in your currency. The drivers could use a little work though.

A slightly better card is the Turtle Beach Santa Cruz, probably $50-60 US, uses the same chip as the Hercules Gametheater XP, and seems to have better drivers than the Fortissimo II.

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I need advice on buying a PCI sound card for recording to be done later this week.  Since it is a one-time project (voice narration), I don't want to spend more than $150-200.  Please don't even mention the "CR" word.

TIA

Try to get one of the semi-pro cards such as an Echo Gina24, Layla or, at the lower end, the Mia. They will leave any of the consumer cards dead in their tracks.

Just my two cents,

Yuyo

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Where does one find these Philips cards? I haven't seen them anywhere here in Belgium. Product page at Philips anyone...?

I did see one on www.bestbuy.com but now it is not there it was 29.99. 8O

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From the Etree FAQ:

http://etree.org/faq_dat-cdr.html

There are many soundcards that allow for digital transfers. A few of the prefered cards are the Zefiro ZA2, Turtle Beach Fiji/Pinnacle, Event Gina, and the SONICPort/DATPort which are both USB devices. For a more extensive list of soundcards with reviews and specs, visit http://www.digitalexperience.com/cards.html

These guys are fairly serious about sound :-)

-Chris

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so how much do the semi-pro cards cost???

im interested in replacing my perpetually tiresome SoundBlagger no-so-live.

lol

They start at about $200-220 and go from there. The overall quality, number of inputs/outputs of a professional card can really make a difference if you are a musician or plan to do music mastering in professional manner. Keep in mind that the Echo cards I listed only tend to have Windows-only proprietary drivers. I always find it is better to go with a card that offers open source drivers, so as not to be chained to a specific hardware platform.

Talking of which, if anybody here has any experience with progessional-grade *nix-compatible cards, I would love to hear from you.

Keep us posted on your progress,

Yuyo

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Guest russofris
I need advice on buying a PCI sound card for recording to be done later this week.  Since it is a one-time project (voice narration), I don't want to spend more than $150-200.  Please don't even mention the "CR" word.

TIA

Is the source an analog or digital mixer?

Thank you for your time,

Frank Russo

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I like the Hercules Gamesurround Fortissimo II as well, about $50 US, whatever that is in your currency.    The drivers could use a little work though.   

A slightly better card is the Turtle Beach Santa Cruz, probably $50-60 US, uses the same chip as the Hercules Gametheater XP, and seems to have better drivers than the Fortissimo II.

I have the Santa Cruz card and absolutely love it. I haven't seen it here in the U.S. for under about $65 dollars for the retail version.

By the way, for anyone interested, you can leave the volume setting on your speaker volume knob where you always prefer and just lower the volume with your keyboard (if you have this option) and there are no pops coming out of your speakers - unlike what happens with Creative's Audigy card: POP! And I mean a loud POP.

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Not to change the subject but that turning the sound down with your keyboard that hogs you cpu usage. I have a compaq internet keyboard that came with my system. and when i did use it my system was really bogged down but i think it was my processor. Junky piece of crap. 8O

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Not to change the subject but that turning the sound down with your keyboard that hogs you cpu usage.  I have a compaq internet keyboard that came with my system.  and when i did use it my system was really bogged down but i think it was my processor.  Junky piece of crap.  8O

I have a Gateway P4 2.26 GHz cpu and no problem with cpu usage - my system is very fast. Honestly, I find it hard to believe a multi-function keyboard is going to slow you down.

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What kind of voice narration will you be doing, and how high does the sound quality need to be? Is this a gradeschool class project, or something a bit higher than that? If you need something that sounds professional, invest your money in a better microphone and mic preamp. After you have those two most important factors down, then any current soundcard ought to do. $50 consumer soundcards aren't equipped to power microphones other than cheap plastic $10 computer ones. You want a decent enough microphone and a mic preamp to drive its output to line level before running it to a soundcard's line input.

If there's going to be anything other than narration being recorded, like background noises or music, I would go with a soundcard that has S/PDIF input and an external DAC.

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I used to be able to notice the CPU usage spikes caused by the movements of my USB mouse when I had my old PIII 733Mhz system. Of course, with my 2.3 Ghz P4 it only amounts to 1-3% of CPU

availability...it could also be a BIOS/chipset thing, with older boards having less efficient implementations of USB.

I suspect the same thing could happen with a USB keyboard, for I know many gamers HATE USB keyboards and mice for their CPU usage.

FS

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I just popped by the M-Audio website to download new drivers for my Delta 1010 and saw an ad for their new USB audio interface for consumers called "Sonica". It seems to be output only, so it might not be what you're after, but I'd buy it sight-unseen, on M-Audio's reputation alone (assuming I needed it).

You may hear reports to the contrary, but as far as I'm concerned M-Audio's converters - in layman's terms - kick more ass than they has any right to for what they cost. Great sound and solid drivers all 'round. For my money, in this price range, I'll go with M-Audio every time.

Piyono

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QUOTE]I used to be able to notice the CPU usage spikes caused by the movements of my USB mouse when I had my old PIII 733Mhz system. Of course, with my 2.3 Ghz P4 it only amounts to 1-3% of CPU

availability...it could also be a BIOS/chipset thing, with older boards having less efficient implementations of USB.

I suspect the same thing could happen with a USB keyboard, for I know many gamers HATE USB keyboards and mice for their CPU usage.

My PS/2 Logitech wheel mouse had stupidly high CPU utilization when using the wheel to scroll up and down windows with the Logitech MouseWare program and drivers. I noticed it after upgrading to one of their new MouseWare versions about a year after I bought my mouse. I instantly un-installed the MouseWare CPU hog and used the standard Microsoft PS/2 mouse instead. I now lose scrolling ability in Visual Studio (where it would be the most useful), but at least i don't tie up my processor anytime I scroll around.

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If there's going to be anything other than narration being recorded, like background noises or music, I would go with a soundcard that has S/PDIF input and an external DAC.

I'm sorry, I meant an external ADC, which you won't be needing if it is strictly narration.

...as far as I'm concerned M-Audio's converters - in layman's terms - kick more ass than they has any right to for what they cost. Great sound and solid drivers all 'round. For my money, in this price range, I'll go with M-Audio every time.

Okay...but a "converter" doesn't use drivers. Do you mean to say soundcards? There are M-Audio branded external converters, but they don't use drivers. This guy needs a $200 soundcard for narration. M-Audio cards at $200 and below don't have microphone driving capability, and don't sound any better as prosumer soundcards compared to their consumer counterparts--their $200 models are mostly designed for low latency electronic music generation or home theater.

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pro-sumer level audio cards (all of which destroy Creative's) brands of choice are M-Audio, Echo and Terratec. check www.musiciansfriend. M-Audio and Terratec cards actually start more around $150. The Echo Mia is $200 (and worth every penny - if you can't tell, i have one).

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pro-sumer level audio cards (all of which destroy Creative's)...

For what use? Creative cards destory prosumer ones in terms of gaming. Prosumer cards destroy Creative cards in terms of latency and routing abilities. These issues are not applicable to LOST6200's needs.

If you want to talk about music listening quality, the audible difference between a Creative SB Live and something like an Maudio Delta/Audiophile 2496 is very slight on the order of being imperceptible much of the time. This is when doing A/B switching on my system with soundcard volume levels matched--Maudio at -1.5. The Live has more audible bass, the Maudio is a tiny bit less smeared. That's about it. However, both soundcards contain the same audible flaws, sounding flat and smeared compared to recent comparatively priced standalone cd players. Soundcards at the $200 and under price level simply don't contain any nice audio grade parts...try an external DAC perhaps.

-NAD 312 integrated amplifier, Axiom Millennia M2ti speakers, Pure Silver Sound Integre' jumper cables, Luminous Audio Synchestra interconnects, MC Z1 speaker cables, Sony CE775 SACD player, M-Audio Audiophile 24/96 and a Creative SB Live Value

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Okay...but a "converter" doesn't use drivers. Do you mean to say soundcards?

Yep. Sorry.

I assumed that was implied as we were discussing sound cards.

This guy needs a $200 soundcard for narration. M-Audio cards at $200 and below don't have microphone driving capability, and don't sound any better as prosumer soundcards compared to their consumer counterparts--their $200 models are mostly designed for low latency electronic music generation or home theater.

Oh, you and your logic, man! Why do you have to go clouding up perfectly good tangential observations with common sense?

Really!

I remember the days when threads got jerked around for days with people going off on little digressive pursuits. But not anymore... No! These days it's "let's carefully read this guy's question and offer him well-thought-out suggestions", or "lets help this guy out as best as we know how".

I don't know what this world is coming to... but I don't like it!

:)

Piyono

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