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Do HDDs benefit from wear leveling?

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I am using a WD AV series drive in my PVR, and wondering what is the best usage for drive longevity. I am concerned that continuously writing to the same sections of a HD will wear it out.  I don’t believe physical HDs have wear leveling feature like SSDs, so which use case would increase drive life:

1) Record, watch, and delete shows quickly, thereby keeping the drive mostly empty. So each recording is written to the same physical sectors of the drive over and over again, while the majority of other sectors are untouched.

2) Record, watch but do not delete shows right away. Wait for the HD to fill up, and then delete shows in batches. This would force the HD to make use of its entire surface. ie. manual drive leveling.

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This is funny, Kevin and I were literally just discussing this. Seagate has a drive health function that shows wear. In a NAS, should be pretty even. But they warranty the Ironwolf drives on writes now. Regular is 180TB a year and Pro is 300TB I think. So, no don't worry about individual platters, etc. but heavy users may need to be cognizant about HDD wear in more general terms.

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Any idea how much of that is actually realistic, tho? Drives in years and decades past-- at least in my memory-- never had drive writes listed in specifications. I can't tell if it's FUD or if it's an actual concern.

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I'm with you entirely. But if they use this as a metric to determine warranty, it's clearly a real thing. We plan on digging into it more...when time allows.

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