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Jeff Poulin

Western Digital announces 200GB EIDE drive

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Today, WD announced they will start shipping a 200MB 7200RPM EIDE drive by next month.  Like the Barracuda V, this one also has 60GB platters.  There will be an optional model that features FDB motors too.

Linkage here:http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/020625/latu054_1.html

Here, too.

http://westerndigital.com/company/releases...sp?release=1404

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so a hard disk can utilize platters of different sizes, ie. 3 x 60gb + 1 x 20gb?

i thought that a hard disk can only utilize one size of platter, but can use either one side of the platter or both sides of it.

if they are using a 20gb platter then this must beg the question that if they have platters of size 60gb, and they are using 4 platters, then why not use 4 x 60gb platters = 240gb hard disk? why use the puny 20gb platter (or half a 40gb platter)?

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I failed to find any more details on WD's next-gen drives.

We'll forgive you. Someday. :-)

If they are releasing a 200GB based on 60GB platters (which is certainly a mystery) they should be offering 240GB in no time at all.

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ok but this still doesnt explain how u get 200gb from a configuration of 60gb platters.

No, but it would not be surprising to find that the WB2000BB is a 66 GB/platter drive.

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No, but it would not be surprising to find that the WB2000BB is a 66 GB/platter drive.

That's what I thought too, but then they're also offering the 120GB model. Do they use 60GB platters on the 120GB drive and 66 on the 200s?

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No, but it would not be surprising to find that the WB2000BB is a 66 GB/platter drive.

That's what I thought too, but then they're also offering the 120GB model. Do they use 60GB platters on the 120GB drive and 66 on the 200s?

Why not? Consider the range of densities in previous offerings, e.g., 26.6 GB/platter, 33.3 GB/platter and 40 GB/platter. It would be nice if WD made a 133 GB drive as it would utilize nearly the full capacity available to legacy controllers. Of course Marketing wants even, round numbers these days.

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It's still only a 3 disk drive, not 3.5 disks. (Though that *would* be interesting to see, wouldn't it? :lol:).

I think WD will just have alternate formats for the 200 GB drive vs. the others. The first 100 GB drive they shipped had 33 GB/platter, while the rest of the same family had 30 GB/platter and even 27 GB/platter. Why not? Although like most folks, I wish they'd use a less confusing naming convention...

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Calling a drive with different-density platters a member of the same "family" as some drives that DO share that characteristic strikes me as cheating.

It also suggests to me - since the 66GB/platter drive probably won't be the volume seller in the lineup - that some of the smaller drives will probably end up with 66GB platters sooner or later. Will that result in a re-classification of the product, a LOT of places to re-map bad sectors or just a bunch of unused space on some of the disks?

I'm also not clear whether this product will be available in ATA133. Is it SATA only or not?

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The way I see it there are two possibilities.

One: use the same media and heads, but physically write more tracks for the 66 GB/platter versions vs. the 60 GB/platter version. Tweak the track width slightly or something (just a guess on my part).

Two: write all drives to the same TPI and format, but "hide" some of the capacity, depending on which type you need.

I'm not sure which would be easier to implement. If the latter is true, it almost sounds like there ought to be a way to "hack" said drive and free up the previously untapped space. If the former is true, then there is no untapped space, since the tracks were never written in the first place.

WD's being awfully vague about what type of interface it has. I doubt it's an ATA133 interface, but then that means they either have serial ATA or ATA100 w/ 48 bit addressing. From a marketing standpoint, wouldn't you want to tout the fact that you have serial ATA? :?

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In the first case, could that not lead to a case similar to the 75GXP, where the "flagship" drive is also considered the least reliable. I'd think that if tolerances suggested that the platters nominally get used for 60GB, then that's how they'd get used.

Interface curiousity is killing me here. I know that anything that supports Ultra-ATA is in theory upgradable to support 48-bit addressing but the only hardware I've seen with that support has been Promise ATA-100 cards.

And yes, I'd like to hear about SATA from a company other than Seagate.

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Couldn't this be an explanation for the 200GB size?

http://www.pcworld.com/news/article/0,aid,...n062502X,00.asp

More Per Platter

The 60GB-per-platter (30GB per side) Barracuda ATA V drives represent another major leap in areal density on hard drives, as the highest previous capacity per drive platter was 40GB (20GB per side).

The advantages of higher densities include lower drive prices and better overall durability, Paulsen says. Prices go down because a huge 120GB drive can be made with just two platters instead of three or more, which means fewer parts in the drive. Fewer moving parts means fewer things that can go wrong inside the drive, which means the drives should last longer, he notes. 

Seagate will drop the capacity of a 60GB platter to 40GB through a technical process it calls destroking. Why demote a 60GB platter to 40GB? "Because PC makers have certain price points they want to hit," Eisman says, and smaller hard drive sizes are another way to differentiate products.

Or, maybe 200GB model using 66GB platter while the other models use 60GB platter. Hm... I hope WD will also produce its new 60+GB platter HDDs with both P-ATA/100 and S-ATA/150 interfaces. Possibly with 16MB buffer now?

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If that's the case, we're talking about 4 platters, with only 3.5 platters used. That's not unusual, every extra side of a platter used costs more for the head to read it. That would make 210GB. And maybe, just maybe, one of the hard drive manufacturers is finally feeling guilty about the advertised drive size and the actual amount we see it as. The 210GB would drop down to about 200GB when formatted.

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BTW, I have heard of no new 5,400-RPM drives from any manufacturer.

Samsung also recently announced the release of 60GB platter drives - the company's doing very well in making profits but not good at communication, so I haven't found any announcement in English. It seemed to me there'd be only 7,200-RPM 60GB and 120GB models.

Seagate announced only 7,200-RPM Barracuda ATA V and its previous release of new 5,400-RPM drives were targeted at the consumer electronics market rather than value or mainstream desktop PC sector.

WD only 7,200-RPM drives as well.

Though IBM decided to sell part (or most?) of its HDD division, IBM also concentrated more on 7,200-RPM GXP series recently.

Seagate's Barracuda ATA V seems to be extraordinarily silent at least from the numbers shown in its PDF specification.

Maybe no more need for 5,400RPM?

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4X50GB anybody ?  :D

I think it's on 3 platters isn't it??? *shrugs* kinda difficult to have 4x50 if it's 3 platters. (hence 66 GB/platter)

Why are these people teasing us with paper releases now??? (well..not FULL paper releases cuz they WILL be out sooon....like...probably some time in the fall or something...but...whyyyy???)

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well i had a look at their press release jsut now:

WD Caviar 60 GB-per-platter 7,200 RPM hard drives will be offered in capacities ranging from 120 to 200 GB and will be available this July. To ensure quiet operation in noise-sensitive desktop/work station environments, Western Digital offers hard drives equipped with optional fluid dynamic bearing (FDB) motors.

Funny.... :oops:

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