janiy

Power consumtion measurements in reviews

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I am planning to build a home server of up to 16 HDDs and I have been searching for figures on startup power draw on 12 V rail (also on 5 V if available) on hard drives to size up my PSU demands. I have found references to some of Storage Review reviews that have included Power Consumption measurements and comparisons. This is the most recent that I have found. Are there any more recent comparisons/measurements? What is the requirement that these measurements are included in the review?

I am of course most interested on NAS HDDs (mainly on WD Red and/or SG Ironwolf).

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You can find power measurements in our IronWolf & IronWolf Pro spec sheets.

On the IronWolf sheet linked, it is under "power management" whereas on the Pro one, it's under "power consumption". Normally, we'd list out the details here but in this case without knowing exact capacities/models, it's probably a little less page-hoggy and soapboxy (yes, we make up words...we're cool like that) to just link it and let people look it up themselves.

One note to add: The standard IronWolf is rated for 1-8 bay enclosures, since you mentioned going up to 16 HDDs in your server, may want to look at more the Pro version, since it is rated for 1-16 bay enclosures.

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9 hours ago, seagate_surfer said:

You can find power measurements in our IronWolf & IronWolf Pro spec sheets.

On the IronWolf sheet linked, it is under "power management" whereas on the Pro one, it's under "power consumption". Normally, we'd list out the details here but in this case without knowing exact capacities/models, it's probably a little less page-hoggy and soapboxy (yes, we make up words...we're cool like that) to just link it and let people look it up themselves.

One note to add: The standard IronWolf is rated for 1-8 bay enclosures, since you mentioned going up to 16 HDDs in your server, may want to look at more the Pro version, since it is rated for 1-16 bay enclosures.

Thank you for your reply. I have been planning of 4 TB version to my server as it is now in the cost/TB sweet spot. I know I can find the startup current on the 12V rail in amps on the spec sheet but I think a real measurement is more reliable than calculating from spec sheet values.

Great, you also mentioned an aspect about servers that I have been wondering for a while now.

How is one HDD rated for 1-8 bay enclosures and another for 1-16 bay enclosures? What is different  in regular and Pro version to make this distinction? What makes Pro better choice for 9-16 bay enclosures? HDD is still just an HDD in any enclosure?

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7 hours ago, janiy said:

 

Thank you for your reply. I have been planning of 4 TB version to my server as it is now in the cost/TB sweet spot. I know I can find the startup current on the 12V rail in amps on the spec sheet but I think a real measurement is more reliable than calculating from spec sheet values.

Great, you also mentioned an aspect about servers that I have been wondering for a while now.

How is one HDD rated for 1-8 bay enclosures and another for 1-16 bay enclosures? What is different  in regular and Pro version to make this distinction? What makes Pro better choice for 9-16 bay enclosures? HDD is still just an HDD in any enclosure?

The nitty-gritty level details might require an engineering answer beyond the scope of what I can personally provide adequately,  however it has a lot to do with RV sensors, and fine-tuning of the drives to work in more demanding environments like high-volume NAS enclosures or servers. Like fine-tuning a car for whatever extreme use it may be applied to. The overall components may be more or less the same or variations of the same as far as what physically makes them up, but you still wouldn't take one to a racetrack that wasn't engineered for racetracks. Same goes with a mountain bike versus a road bike. They're made up of mostly the same stuff, yet they're used for different environments and purposes. The IronWolf Pro comes with RV sensors on all models, 1.2 million hours MTBF compared to 1 million for standard IronWolf, as well as a 300TB of data per year workload rating for the Pro and a 180TB workload rating for the standard IronWolf. If you'd like to go deeper, there is an interesting article Storage Review did a couple of years ago on the topic in collaboration with Seagate to dive deeper than the typical spec-sheet stuff:

Pick The Right Drive For The Job - 24/7 NAS HDDs vs Desktop HDDs

We also have a YouTube video  which shares some of the specifics as well if you'd like to check it out.

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