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danyadd

Seagate 10TB Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD (Helium)

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I'm about to buy two Seagate Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD (Helium) hard drives.
I'm interested in the 10TB drives, 512E, SATA.

There are two Seagate models that look identical to me.

What is the difference between model ST10000NM0016 and ST10000NM0086 ?

I asked Seagate but I didn't get any real answer.

I'm not interested in Encryption and I can't find any explanation of what "Hyperscale 512e" is.
At the moment the only model available in Italy seems to be ST10000NM0016.

Link to Seagate website showing all models:

http://www.seagate.com/gb/en/internal-hard-drives/enterprise-hard-drives/hdd/enterprise-capacity-3-5-hdd-10tb/?sku=ST10000NM0016#specs

User Manual of ST10000NM0086:
http://www.seagate.com/www-content/product-content/enterprise-hdd-fam/enterprise-capacity-3-5-hdd/enterprise-capacity-3-5-hdd/en-us/docs/100803343a.pdf

User Manual of ST10000NM0016:
http://www.seagate.com/www-content/product-content/enterprise-hdd-fam/enterprise-capacity-3-5-hdd/enterprise-capacity-3-5-hdd/en-us/docs/100791104c.pdf

What is the difference between model ST10000NM0016 and ST10000NM0086 ?

I need your help!

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It's the same drive, one just has encryption, which is likely required by some of their customers.

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It's the same drive, one just has encryption, which is likely required by some of their customers.

Thank you Brian!

I understand that model ST10000NM0016 has some kind of encryption (not explained in detail in the manual).

Since this is the model that I'm buying (the only one available in Italy) and since I don't need encryption I'd like to ask:

1) does encryption slow down the hard drive in any way at all?

2) If in the future I connect this hard drive to another PC, will the encryption create problems in reading the content?

Thanks in advance!

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No, it's SED, pretty standard and actually something that most/many prefer. It's compatible with all systems. Essentially what you're getting is the ability via software to blow away the key nearly instantly, making the contents of the drive unreadable.

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The encrypting drives should basically be the same as a standard drive until you issue the command to enable encryption of the drive on your bios/controller/etc.  

What happens is the drive will still be encrypting things with a key stored in the nvram on the drive controller but it will operate in unlocked mode where no password or key is needed to start the drive.  Essentially it looks and feels like a normal drive.  The advantage to you is that if you use a utility to send the command to self erase the drive it only has to delete the built in random encryption key so the data on the drive can no longer be read.  A brand new encryption key is created and the drive appears to contain complete garbage random data as the old key is now gone.  This takes only a second to complete vs doing multiple overwrite passes the old fashioned way of erasing your data from a drive you want to dispose of.  Another advantage is that if the drive has a head crash you can still erase the key from nvram and even if someone does a head swap they cannot get your data back which is a problem you have probably faced when disks crash that you cannot secure erase before sending for an RMA.

If you don't care about the encryption, just grab whatever is in stock.  I believe with all the new Seagate enterprise drives even the non-encryption model is actually doing the encryption internally it simply doesn't expose the SED feature to the bios so you can still issue the command to self erase it just will not prompt your controller to enable the SED features.  They call it ISE (Instant Self Erase).  If that's the case your drive is still encrypting internally, just hiding it from you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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