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alanmcrae

USB external hard drives - RDX vs popular off-the-shelf drives

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I have been experimenting with some RDX USB 3.0 External Hard Drives from HP as a possible SMB/SME standardized platform, and I'd like to know how they compare performance-wise to more conventional off-the-shelf external USB 3.0 hard drives. Is there a reputable performance comparison published online that includes RDX, and, if not, if there an off-the-shelf USB External HD comparison study that uses benchmark tests that I could perform myself on my own RDX units to create my own comparison? (I'd be happy to share my results)

Note that the physical write protect switch on RDX hard drive cartridges gives RDX a comparable advantage for many SMB/SME applications that would benefit from ReadOnly mounting of datasets, although the price differential, at this time, makes RDX a bit pricey per MB of storage. As I'm interested in network security forensics, hard drive imaging & disaster recovery, critical data file backup & recovery, bootable Windows To Go & Linux Workspaces, and Windows 7 to Windows 8/10 migration testing, the price differential might be more palatable if RDX drive performance is acceptable compared to non-write protected off-the-shelf USB hard drives.

I've notice that storage experts use benchmark tests like Iometer, H2Bench, DiskBench, HD Tune Pro, Crystal Disk Mark, AS SSD Benchmark, ATTO DISK Benchmark, and others. Which one would you recommend for my testing & comparison purposes?

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No idea to be honest-- pick up a few and try, then when you're done resell them on the for sale forum here or whatever other tech forum you frequent?

Make sure you get UASP or whatnot working between the two if you can, to maximum performance. (some motherboards call it "turbowrite" or something on their USB 3.0/USB 3.1 controllers).

As far as actual benchmarks, I have no idea what would represent your workload best. Honestly I'm lazy, CrystalDiskMark or something is usually enough for a quick overall picture of performance. Obviously if your workload has something specific, generating an applicable trace in IOMeter is probably best...

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Thanks continuum.

I have noticed that users are reporting that malware can get installed along with the CrystalDiskMark utility. (see http://download.cnet.com/CrystalDiskMark/3000-2094_4-75330576.html)

This is always a concern with freeware/shareware, so I try to be as careful as possible.

I think I'll wait to hear from more storage experts before risking the CrystalDiskMark on any of my systems. Hopefully one of the other hard drive performance utilities will have a more golden reputation.

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Well, you already know of a bunch of others if you're afraid of malware. (FWIW, we haven't had any issues with CrystalDiskMark, but we're obviously only downloading from reputable places :P ..) ATTO and AS-SSD and whatnot are all fine for a quick glance too.

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