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Adam_a

Dell PowerEdge R730 Server w/ Intel Broadwell Review Discussion

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The Dell PowerEdge R730 was already one of our favorite 2U server platforms for mainstream computing and they make up the core of the load generation segment of our test lab. With the new Intel v4 CPUs, we're able to squeeze out even more performance of the servers, incidentally with a pin for pin upgrade that's pretty easy to handle. While most won't be retrofitting their servers with new CPUs, those considering between v3 and v4 CPUs clearly have an easy choice to make if performance is paramount. Beyond performance, we also saw a lower CPU utilization figure under heavy load. This means there's now more room in the CPU for more applications on the server, an additional key metric when evaluating workload scalability in the server.

Dell PowerEdge 13G R730 Server with Intel Broadwell Review

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One big problem with your review and comparison testing is that you are comparing the 18-core Xeon E5-2699 v3 to the 22-core Xeon E5-2699 v4. You have 36 total physical cores with the Haswell-EP processors and 44 total physical cores with the Broadwell-EP processors in your two-socket system. Having 22% more physical cores is obviously going to affect your total CPU capacity and average CPU utilization during a test like this (assuming you don't have any other bottlenecks).

A much more useful comparison would have been with models that had the same core count from both generations, such as the E5-2667 v3 vs. the E5-2667 v4 (if the E5-2667 v4 still has eight cores). Then we would be able to see the actual improvement from going to Broadwell, especially if the base clock speeds are the same.

Perhaps you did not have access to different processors from each generation with the same core counts, but even so, you might have wanted to talk about this issue.

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I get the point on the core difference comment. From our view we are looking more at what is possible to bring out of a dual-socket Intel system, where previously you were capped at one figure... now you get 22% more cores to play with.

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You're right, we got what we got. As we get more CPUs to play with we will see what else we can do and see what types of core comparisons can be done.

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