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perdaniel

Not able to run Seatools for Windows

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I have a Seagate 3TB (ST3000DM001) that I have had some trouble with. Seatools for DOS (the only versions I have managed to run) claims that it is OK, but according to HD Tune it has 57848 retired sectors. I'm not able to run Seatools for Windows. The disk controller is set to AHCI in BIOS. I have read that the disk shouldn't be in AHCI, but when I change that I'm not able to boot. The disk is still under warranty and I would like to return it, but I'm not sure that the shop will take it back as long as Seatools claims that it is OK. Does anyone have any advice?

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What does Seatools bootable say as far as retired sectors? You should be able to pull extensive health data off any version of Seatools, more than just a 'drive ok.'

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This may or may not help in your situation.

1) Some Seagate drives don't report SMART data correctly. Personally I've only seen it on their short-lived SSD line, but I suppose it could happen on a spinner also.

2) Some drive monitoring programs simply pull the SMART data wrong, or report it wrong. Some SSDs have SMART values that do not exist on spinning drives, such as for TB read and written from host, and some have it also for TB read and written to NAND. I've seen GPartEd / PartedMagic tell me that a perfectly good SSD was failing because the apps skipped an entry for TB read and written, causing the app to display 3 trillion CRC errors rather than 3 trillion bytes read. Said differently, those lines reported in the SMART reporting utilities differ considerably from app to app and drive to drive.

3) HD Tune is useless. Sorry but true. CrystalDiskInfo is much more accurate, most of the time. Be sure to go to Function -> Advanced Feature -> Raw Values and report them in 10(Dec). Now its starts to make sense.

4) My experience only, but SeaTools is absolutely useless. The ONLY thing it's useful for is getting Seagate to take a failing drive back.

5) You probably know, but be aware that only a few SMART values mean anything to the consumer. And see this attached pic for what I mean about entries specific to SSDs (at the bottom).

post-13-0-97285600-1450379408_thumb.png

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And in this attached shot, you can see that CDI is also vulnerable to "misreading" SMART values. Note in the Kingston utility, that the drive has read 2679477 sectors with 0 errors. Look at how CrystalDiskInfo reports that. Same further down the SMART attribute list, at the ECC entries.

Different drives report differently, and different utilities interpret differently. You gotta use a bunch and figure it out which ones work best and where :) But HD Tune can be let go.

post-13-0-37882100-1450386581_thumb.png

Edited by Axl

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What does Seatools bootable say as far as retired sectors? You should be able to pull extensive health data off any version of Seatools, more than just a 'drive ok.'

I can't see that it says anything about retired sector. It says that SMART is supported and enabled, SMART has not been tripped, and that the tests (both short and long) has been passed. It doesn't really say anything about the health of the drive, and I can't see where I should be able to find that data.

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You could boot Gparted or PartedMagic (from 8/2013 or earlier) and check their SMART readings versus SeaTools. Still doesn't help with getting SeaTools to report a problem, which you'll likely need for RMA. Good luck, I gave away a Seagate SSD 600 which was faulty from day one but would not throw a Seatools error, so no RMA. You could watch the disk errors climb by the millions during a benchmark run.

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This may or may not help in your situation.

1) Some Seagate drives don't report SMART data correctly. Personally I've only seen it on their short-lived SSD line, but I suppose it could happen on a spinner also.

2) Some drive monitoring programs simply pull the SMART data wrong, or report it wrong. Some SSDs have SMART values that do not exist on spinning drives, such as for TB read and written from host, and some have it also for TB read and written to NAND. I've seen GPartEd / PartedMagic tell me that a perfectly good SSD was failing because the apps skipped an entry for TB read and written, causing the app to display 3 trillion CRC errors rather than 3 trillion bytes read. Said differently, those lines reported in the SMART reporting utilities differ considerably from app to app and drive to drive.

3) HD Tune is useless. Sorry but true. CrystalDiskInfo is much more accurate, most of the time. Be sure to go to Function -> Advanced Feature -> Raw Values and report them in 10(Dec). Now its starts to make sense.

4) My experience only, but SeaTools is absolutely useless. The ONLY thing it's useful for is getting Seagate to take a failing drive back.

5) You probably know, but be aware that only a few SMART values mean anything to the consumer. And see this attached pic for what I mean about entries specific to SSDs (at the bottom).

I have downloaded and used CrystalDiskInfo. It gave a caution for the disk:

DnXFSsE.jpg

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