Adam_a

SuperMicro SuperChassis 846BE1C-R1K28B Review Discussion

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The SuperMicro SuperChassis 846BE1C-R1K28B 24-bay JBOD is a 4U direct attached storage unit with cost-effectiveness and flexibility in mind. With 24 drive bays, that can fit with 3.5” or with an adaptor 2.5” drives and supports both SAS and SATA, the JBOD can have a maximum capacity of 192TB with 8TB HDDs. Like a large majority of what SuperMicro offers, the 846BE1C JBOD offers a lot of flexibility as to what processors and motherboards it supports if users choose to use the 846BE1C as a headunit.

SuperMicro SuperChassis 846BE1C-R1K28B Review

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I am interested in knowing how many columns have you used for your Tiered configuration.

One particular issue with storage spaces is that the number of columns must be equal on both tiers. So if you configured a mirrored tiered pool with 4 ssds then the number of columns would be 2 (determined by the lowest number of drives in a tier divided by 2). So even if you have 20 HDDs, on that tier, you would only have the performance of a 2 HDD RAID0 array. Depending on your dataset size, you could very quickly feel the harsh decrease in performance once you exceed the SSD tier size (in your case that would be 1TB+).

Vlad

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I'll reach out to one of the microsoft guys for an answer on that. The matching column size issue would force you into a corner in quite a few cases (what if you wanted to leverage X number of spindles on one side but not the entire, going for a single PCIe/NVMe SSD for flash instead).

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I'll reach out to one of the microsoft guys for an answer on that. The matching column size issue would force you into a corner in quite a few cases (what if you wanted to leverage X number of spindles on one side but not the entire, going for a single PCIe/NVMe SSD for flash instead).

It can and it does. Few articles mention this (a couple on DataON and one Toshiba article I believe) on top of personal experience. One way to find the number of columns a volume has is by running Get-VirtualDisk | fl in a powershell environment.

I believe you can manually create a volume (using powershell) and force the SSD tier to have the same number of columns as the number of SSDs (using your configuration as an example, the SSD tier would have 4 columns making it a 4 disk RAIDo and on the HDD side the equivalent of 16 disk RAID10). But this will put the hot data (the one that is moved on the faster tier) in jeopardy in case of a single SSD failure. This is because the fast tier is not a cache per se, being part of the total storage pool.

Given the above, going for a single PCIe/NVMe SSD configuration is unwise. If it fails, the data on that tier is gone.

Other then that I like Storage Spaces :)

Vlad

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