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My hard disk temperature is too high?

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I have two hard disk, one is Maxtor Diamond Max 5400rpm and other one is Seagate Barracuda IV. I install them in a 3 slot 3.5" bracket with a empty slot between them. I used HDD Temperature to measure Barracuda IV's temperature, it show 43°C. Is that normal? And here's environment temperature is 30°C. Is it necessary move one disk to the 5.25" bracket?

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You will find that modern drives heat up to 10-15 degrees above the ambient environment of the drive. That is without cooling. Moving the drive to a differnt part of the computer which is still at your quoted ambient temp of 30 degrees will not have an effect on the drives temperature.

If you want to lower the temperature of the drive , you will need to more effectively cool the inside of your case.

As a point of reference we recently measured a new DELL computers inside case temperature to be only 2 degrees above the outside room air. That is impressive.

All said and done though, a 43 degree temperature is well within the operating specs of the drive and I would not be overly concerned. If the drive temperature goes above 50 C or you are in a region with thin air, I would do something to cool the drive

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43 C is not that bad. Besides, you have a high ambient temperature...so..the hard drives are probably one of the last on the things-to-worry about list. CPU and your video card being #1 and #2.

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43 C is not that bad. Besides, you have a high ambient temperature...so..the hard drives are probably one of the last on the things-to-worry about list. CPU and your video card being #1 and #2.

My CPU and video card are old. The hard disk is the newest thing I gotta have. I wrote to Seagate Tech Support, they said "The operating temperature range for most Seagate hard drives is 5 to 50 degrees". Is that true? If ambient temperature reaches 50 degrees, the HDD's temperature will reach much more it.

Last, thanks you for your reply.

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Operating range refers to the ambient air temperature around the drive while it is operating. It does not refer to the actual temperature inside the drive, which can reach 100 C or higher. As long as the air around the drive stays within the 5-50 C range (or whatever your specific model calls for), you don't need to worry.

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If ambient temperature reaches 50 degrees, the HDD's temperature will reach much more it. 

The temperatures are not exactly... summed. Surely, ambient temperature plays a role as a heat sink, but having 50ºC ambient temperature doesn't mean your HD will fry...

Physics 101

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no..but you would probably be close to being able to cook eggs on them. ;)....vola! breakfast is served! (good thing that his system isn't a server...cuz otherwise that would have been a terrible joke)

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Operating range refers to the ambient air temperature around the drive while it is operating. It does not refer to the actual temperature inside the drive, which can reach 100 C or higher. As long as the air around the drive stays within the 5-50 C range (or whatever your specific model calls for), you don't need to worry.

When a drive reports its temperature to software, is that the ambient air temperature, the internal temperature, or something else?

(Perhaps another question which might better satisfy my curiosity is, if tape a thermistor onto the outside surface (side or top) of a hard drive, and the thermistor reads at, say, 55 degrees on a drive that is supposed to have a max operating temp of 50 degrees, does that mean the drive's likely to be within the 50 degree max for the operating temperature?)

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Sorry, but I don't know which value the drive will report to software. I don't know specifically where (if any) on the drive there is a thermal sensor. I suspect it's part of the PCB as I haven't seen it on a mechanical BOM.

I know we sometimes measure the change in resistance across the actuator coil to get the temperature of the coil, but that would be the drive's internal temperature, not the PCB or external ambient temperature. Coil temperatures are easily over 90 C. The temp on the cover, for example, wouldn't get that hot because of dissipation via convection (the air from the spinning disks), conduction through the base and cover, and convection to the outside air.

I guess the reason for an operating external temperature is if it's too high, then the drive can't dissipate heat to its surroundings fast enough to get around excessive heat production inside.

Good question. I'll have to ask someone that is more familiar with the PCB components.

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How can I install two hardisk in a case without HDD cooling fan, and don't let the hard disk become too hot? Now I install them in a 3 slot 3.5" bracket and with a empty slot between them. Once I toutched the top surface of the Barracuda IV and felt so hot.

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See my post of "Barracuda IVs are a disaster!!!!" on 23/6/02 for temp tests.

PS. I no longer think they are a disaster and I am now embarrased at my original troll like behaviour. :oops:

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I have a little question for u guys.

I have a Cuda IV in a non extra cooled removable HD tray (it's quite tight in there). As I mentionend no fan ist blowing or sucking air in/out of this tray. Now I downloaded HDDTemperature and it gaves me 49°C of the Cuda IV under load. Is that too high or ok? And please don't say that lower temps result in longer life for the drive thats clear :D

I just want to know whether the drive can stand such temps or if I have to change something.

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Most drives are speced to run in ambient (case) temps of 55-60 C. In fact, the Cuda IV is speced to operate in 60 C cases:

http://www.seagate.com/cda/products/discsa...085,384,00.html

Temperature does have a bit of an effect on reliability, but 43 or even 50 C is nothing to worry about. If you constantly run at 60 C or over long term, then you should look into that, but honestly, 7200 rpm IDE drives simply do not run hot enough to even warrant a thought about heat issues and cooling requirements.

If you had first generation X15's or IBM 36z15 15,000 rpm SCSI drives, then you might have something to worry about. But 7200 and 5400 rpm IDE? Give me a break.

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I have to add something:

The drive didn't stay at 49° but went up to 55° (I formatted a big 50 GB partition). After that I was a bit worried and removed the HD tray opened it and touched the cuda....OUCH that thing was damn hot...after that I think it's smarter to put the driver somwhere else but in this tray...

but still thanks for your fast reply

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Most drives are speced to run in ambient (case) temps of 55-60 C. In fact, the Cuda IV is speced to operate in 60 C cases: 

http://www.seagate.com/cda/products/discsa...085,384,00.html

Temperature does have a bit of an effect on reliability, but 43 or even 50 C is nothing to worry about. If you constantly run at 60 C or over long term, then you should look into that, but honestly, 7200 rpm IDE drives simply do not run hot enough to even warrant a thought about heat issues and cooling requirements. 

If you had first generation X15's or IBM 36z15 15,000 rpm SCSI drives, then you might have something to worry about. But 7200 and 5400 rpm IDE? Give me a break.

My IBM 30GB 75XP drive's internal temp sensor evidently maxes out at 60C, and at those temps, tends to develop bad sectors.

I would not run a HD for long periods of time in temps in excess of 45C. Not if you care at all about the HD. I think you are totally wrong about 7200 RPM IDE drives not needing to worry about cooling requirements.

Come back and tell us all how cooling doesn't matter for your 7200 RPM drives, after they have been in operation for over a year running in 60C temps... that is, if they are still running at all.

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