uart

New Toshiba Canvio (USB). Very high reallocated sector count!

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Ok, I know that the raw data reported by SMART is essentially proprietary, and so we should really only pay attention to the "Current", "Worst" and "Threshold" fields. However I've never come across a HDD that didn't report the actual number of reallocated sectors in the SMART raw data.

I just bought a "Toshiba Canvio Simple 3.0", which is a 1TB external USB powered usb3 drive, and I was a bit alarmed to see the raw data for reallocated sectors count was "...00F0" straight out of the box!

I returned the drive to the shop and they gave me a replacement, which initially reported zero reallocated sectors on the first usage. However after I got home and ran a "chkdsk /r" that blew out to "...001658" in the raw data, and the "Crystal Disk Info" software I'm using reports an "Amber Warning" on the drive.

The thing is, the "current" and "worst" fields still read 100 (with threshold = 50), so I know that the drive must actually be healthy. Also chkdsk /r found no bad sectors. So I tend to think that the drive is actually ok and that this is just something weird about how Toshiba handles the raw data for realloc sector count.

Anyway, just wondering if anyone else has noticed this anomaly with the SMART data from Toshiba drives lately. BTW, Crystal Disk Info reports the drive as being a "TOSHIBA MQ01ABD100" if that means anything.

Edited by uart

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afaik smart id 05 - 07 - 0A - 0B - C4 ~ C8 need to stay at 0 (default state)

otherwise sign of internal failure

even the threshold show different from a maker to another

but i believe those ID raw value need to stay 0

if me, i am going to bring it back to shop again and get replaced it again

by the 3rd time i still getting bad drive, i am just ask for refund and get another model/brand

although reallocated sectors count should not related to usb cable (usually c7 that related to bad usb cable)

but maybe good idea to replace the cable + adaptor just to make sure

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afaik smart id 05 - 07 - 0A - 0B - C4 ~ C8 need to stay at 0 (default state)

otherwise sign of internal failure

even the threshold show different from a maker to another

but i believe those ID raw value need to stay 0

Thanks for your input slyphnier. :)

I'm going to try returning the drive today and see if I can swap it out for another brand. I don't know what the issue is, but two out of two is not a good sign.

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Hi there @uart!


I agree with @slyphnier about the S.M.A.R.T. attributes so I would suggest to replace the drive if possible, or to be cautious when you use it and don't leave unbackedup data on it.


As for the results, the 05 Reallocated Sector Count attribute is basically the invisible bad sectors that have been swapped with reserve sectors. These sectors are no longer visible to your operating system and as such can't cause any more problems, but they're quite big in number and a drive which has many reallocations is more likely to fail. So if they continue to increase you should be worried.


Hope this helps.


Cheers! :)

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Hi there @uart!
I agree with @slyphnier about the S.M.A.R.T. attributes so I would suggest to replace the drive if possible, or to be cautious when you use it and don't leave unbackedup data on it.
As for the results, the 05 Reallocated Sector Count attribute is basically the invisible bad sectors that have been swapped with reserve sectors. These sectors are no longer visible to your operating system and as such can't cause any more problems, but they're quite big in number and a drive which has many reallocations is more likely to fail. So if they continue to increase you should be worried.
Hope this helps.
Cheers! :)

Thanks Mighty. Yeah it's been nagging away at me since I got it. So today I'd had enough and took it back to the store and exchanged it for a "seagate expansion".

I know what reallocated sectors are, and in my opinion that is the single most important smart value for predicting drive failure. I just couldn't understand how two brand new drives could have that many reallocated sectors straight out of the box, so I thought it might have just been something anomalous about how toshiba were handling the raw data on that attribute.

To be honest, I'm starting to think that slyphnier might have been on the right track re the usb error thing.

although reallocated sectors count should not related to usb cable (usually c7 that related to bad usb cable)

but maybe good idea to replace the cable + adaptor just to make sure

You know I'm starting to think that something dicky with the usb connection might be the common factor here. Both "failed" drives came with their own (new) cables, so I don't think that was the common factor. I did however test each drive on one of the front USB ports of my (desktop) computer, and I know that these are a little suspect with usb powered drives. (My very old and well used WD passport wont even power up properly when plugged into either of these!)

So one of the first tests I did on each drive (to test how good was its usb compatibility) was to test it on one of these front ports. For the record, both drives powered up and detected correctly, but both had some degree of difficulty transferring files and on one or more occasions hung up and I had to abort the transfer. So perhaps this is where the offending smart anomalies occurred?

Edited by uart

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I ended up exchanging it for a Seagate Expansion drive, (model STBX1000301), as it was the only other option they had in stock. So far this drive is working flawlessly, and even seems to work correctly on my sometimes troublesome front usb ports.

Here are the SMART values of the new drive:

post-1765-0-54653000-1436524144_thumb.jp

BTW. If you notice how the "fitness" value on the above drive is 100% in speedfan, that read zero on the previous Toshiba drive with all the reallocated sectors. I'm really glad I exchanged the drive now. :)

Edited by uart

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Ok, I know that the raw data reported by SMART is essentially proprietary, and so we should really only pay attention to the "Current", "Worst" and "Threshold" fields. However I've never come across a HDD that didn't report the actual number of reallocated sectors in the SMART raw data.

I just bought a "Toshiba Canvio Simple 3.0", which is a 1TB external USB powered usb3 drive, and I was a bit alarmed to see the raw data for reallocated sectors count was "...00F0" straight out of the box!

I returned the drive to the shop and they gave me a replacement, which initially reported zero reallocated sectors on the first usage. However after I got home and ran a "chkdsk /r" that blew out to "...001658" in the raw data, and the "Crystal Disk Info" software I'm using reports an "Amber Warning" on the drive.

It's not really that high, I've had a drive that had 500 bad sectors practically out of the box and another one with about 3000. Both are still working fine after about 5 years of 24/7 running in a server. And these were never designed to be server drives in the first place. There's no real correlation, one bad sector can be fatal while a thousand can be harmless.

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