Adam_a

Samsung 850 EVO SSD 2TB Review

Recommended Posts

The Samsung 850 EVO is a 2.5” SSD with the highest capacity currently available on the commercial market at 2TB. The current capacity doubles the previous maximum from the 850 EVO line, which as stayed near the top of our leaderboard since it was first introduced. The drive claims pretty impressive performance in part thanks to its TurboWrite technology, not to mention low power consumption, and advanced encryption functions. The drive has a SATA 6Gb/s interface and comes with a 5-year warranty.

Samsung 850 EVO SSD 2TB Review

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Pro is just 25% more, so I think it might actually be a better deal to just go with the Pro. It's great though that even higher end SSDs are seeing a price per GB fall.

Now if only we could get some cheap PCI-E NVMe SSDs ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Pro is just 25% more, so I think it might actually be a better deal to just go with the Pro. It's great though that even higher end SSDs are seeing a price per GB fall.

Now if only we could get some cheap PCI-E NVMe SSDs ....

Where I live, it's 30% more, but more importantly, the Evo is already 12% more than other 1TB SSDs making the Pro a good 44% - or a full $170 more than the cheapest 1TB SSD.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where I live, it's 30% more, but more importantly, the Evo is already 12% more than other 1TB SSDs making the Pro a good 44% - or a full $170 more than the cheapest 1TB SSD.

I was relying on the official MSRP, $800 vs $1000, both in USD. But yeah, prices do vary throughout the world. I live in Canada and right now with the weak Canadian dollar, things are more costly.

On the other hand, the Pro is a faster SSD, so you are paying for that versus say, the MX200 (or whatever other SSD of equal size). Right now, the MX200 is about $510 CAD + tax, versus just under $580 CAD + tax for the SSD 850 - both 1TB sizes. I'd assume that the 2TB variant would be similar.

I guess it's a matter of if you're willing to pay more for a faster SSD.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It'd be interesting to see power consumption. The 5V rating is 1.95 amps on the front of the drive versus 1.4 amps for the 250GB (EDIT: I guess 120 to 1TB) 850 Evo model.

EDIT:So this model uses 32 layer 3D NAND like the smaller capacity 850 EVOs but each chip holds twice the data of the lower capacity 850 EVOs. 8 chips for 1TB, 8 chips for 2TB.

Edited by danwat1234

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Terrific product. It's a tremendous amount of very fast storage for a price that's actually reasonable for mere mortals to afford. Love it.

To your point in the article about Samsung being the market leader, I agree. They are my go-to recommendation for SSDs. Considering the prices, reliability and performance, they're hard to beat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To your point in the article about Samsung being the market leader, I agree. They are my go-to recommendation for SSDs. Considering the prices, reliability and performance, they're hard to beat.

Problem is Samsung's track record for reliability has been rather more miss than hit lately, and their denial that extensive data corruption on Linux is a problem worth fixing is worrying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Problem is Samsung's track record for reliability has been rather more miss than hit lately, and their denial that extensive data corruption on Linux is a problem worth fixing is worrying.

But isn't those reliability problems related only to the 840 Evo-range and 840 Basic ? 850 Evo uses newer Nand which not have this problem as far as I know.

Still bad support/business tho by Samsung not releasing firmware update to the 840 Evo mSata and 840 Basic. And it seems to me like they'r getting away with it reasonably well unlike IBM with their "Deathstar" series of HDDs. Samsung should take better responsibility really.

I don't know if anyone ever tried to file a Class-action Lawsuit against Samsung for this mess for the SSDs not receiving firmware updates. That's what some guy did against IBM so that they had react. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HGST_Deskstar#Lawsuit

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But isn't those reliability problems related only to the 840 Evo-range and 840 Basic ? 850 Evo uses newer Nand which not have this problem as far as I know.

Still bad support/business tho by Samsung not releasing firmware update to the 840 Evo mSata and 840 Basic. And it seems to me like they'r getting away with it reasonably well unlike IBM with their "Deathstar" series of HDDs. Samsung should take better responsibility really.

No, the 850 Pro is the worst affected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, the 850 Pro is the worst affected.

What do you think of this? He says Evo 850 is OK at least in Macs:

From: http://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/37852/trim-enabler

IF YOU OWN A SAMSUNG EVO OR EVO PRO, 840 OR 850, be sure to install the latest firmware before turning on TRIM support

http://www.samsung.com/global/business/semiconductor/minisite/SSD/global/html/support/downloads.html



There is a lot of confusion about the multiple issues with the Samsung and the need for firmware update. Some users are insisting the problem is only with Linux, and you don't need a firmware update. Not true, there are actually TWO critical issues discovered so far with the EVO drives, one Linux related, the other NOT.



One problem, related to the drives having an incorrect bit set that tells the OS what type of NCQ queing command it supports. The incorrect bit says that EVO supports beyond normal sequential queued TRIM commands (it does not) and then Linux attempts to implement (which does support more than sequential) and runs in to problems.



Windows and OS X ignore this bit because as of now, they only support 'normal' sequential TRIM, so is unaffected BY THIS ONE PARTICULAR PROBLEM.



HOWEVER, there is ANOTHER issue with Samsung EVO related to reading data that is 'old' (not been accessed for a long time) where the charge may degrade, requiring multiple attempts to read the data. This problem is not OS specific and deals with the actual physical nature of the drive itself. The latest firmware from April 15, 2015 fixes this by periodically 'refreshing' in the background all the data on the drive to keep the charge strong, even data that isn't accessed. This problem affects the drive regardless of OS, so highly recommended you update the firmware. Read more about this SEPARATE PROBLEM UNRELATED TO THE LINUX PROBLEM HERE:


http://www.extremetech.com/gaming/203449-new-samsung-840-evo-firmware-will-add-periodic-refresh-capability%E2'>

To all, my typo error, I meant firmware is available for the models 830 and 840, not the 850. If you have an 850 model, it is not effected by the either read refresh or sequential trim bit error. I apologize.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now