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Samsung 850 EVO M.2 SSD Review

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As is the case with the other Samsung 850 EVO models, the M.2 version features power-saving functionality, enabling users to use their device longer and more efficiently. Samsung indicates that the 850 EVO M.2 saves upwards of 30% more on power compared to 840 EVO during write operations due to the company’s use of the new 3D V-NAND, translating to roughly half the power of Planar 2D NAND. In addition, the 850 EVO M.2 includes a Device Sleep mode, which operates at 2mW to extend battery life on laptops.

Samsung 850 EVO M.2 SSD Review

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Considering street prices, I can sense the end of 2.5'' HDDs in capacities below 1tb is close, very close in almost all form factors and but very low-end and legacy applications.

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No other drives in the graphs in the review for comparison purposes? The conclusion states performance lacking in real-world benchmarks, but it's not as easy to distinguish why this is the case with no other drives in the charts. :)

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It's not radically faster than the SATA 3 variants. Only drives like the XP941 or SM951 are. My guess is they are going to release a 3D NAND variant at some point of that as well.

It'd be interesting to see in the future whether they will release an M.2 850 Pro in the future.

No other drives in the graphs in the review for comparison purposes? The conclusion states performance lacking in real-world benchmarks, but it's not as easy to distinguish why this is the case with no other drives in the charts. :)

This might help:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/9023/the-samsung-ssd-850-evo-msata-m2-review

We do seem to be heading towards the NVMe and 3D NAND era though. We'll start to see more drives like Mushkin's Hyperion M.2.

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Edited by CrazyElf

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Indeed, M.2 is going to hang in there, likely supplanting mSATA for everything except embedded applications and others that are severely space constrained. But even then shorter M.2 is not impossible. What's really interesting is thinking about M.2 in the data center. Right now Lenovo supports a few drives on-board via M.2. We've seen server designs from others though that show how these drives could be inserted into cartridges and front mounted in servers. The density gets pretty interesting, though this is pretty early and remains to be seen if there's demand for such things.

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For almost a year now, it's been possible to get an M.2 SSD bootup.

Back in May 2014, at The SSD Review, they were able to get an XP941 to be used as a boot drive on an Asrock Z97 motherboard:

http://www.thessdreview.com/Forums/ssd-beginners-guide-and-discussion/3987-xp941-asrock-z97-extreme6-ultra-2-windows-7-install.html

Of course that was bleeding edge back then. Today the SM951 is out and I suppose such things are possible with Z97 and X99 motherboards. Whether consumers can take advantage of the speeds of SSDs like the SM951 though is another matter.

Everyone is expecting Samsung to release another super fast M.2 at some point.

Edited by CrazyElf

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It's not radically faster than the SATA 3 variants.

The Samsung 850 EVO m.2 is still using SATA inteface electrically. For a new-generation Samsung m.2 drive using PCI-e you're going to need to wait for the PM951, which is still a pain in the butt to get...

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