Brian

Toshiba Claims Highest Areal Density in a 2.5" HDD Discussion

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Toshiba provided very few other details on this advancement other than the technology is standard Perpendicular Magnetic Recording (PMR) as opposed to the newer Shingled Magnetic Recording (SMR) drives that are starting to come to market. It's likely that this latest density gain is near the last for Toshiba's PMR drives however as SMR can drive dramatic capacity gains, albeit at the cost of performance.

Toshiba Claims Highest Areal Density in a 2.5" HDD

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"New SMR" drives makes it sound like SMR would replace PMR. I'd rather expect that PMR will at some point be replaced by heat assisted recording, and SMR by heat assisted SMR. The performance hit of SMR is so severe that it can't replace regular drives anytime soon. They'll coexist until HDDs are only needed for archives and something else replaces the regular high capacity drives.

MrS

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This use case is largely around DAS portables, that's a venue SMR will certainly play in as early as this year. HAMR is a very long way away.

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Oh...and the performance hit of SMR is going to be very different for each vendor depending on the audience they're targeting for. As we know, the Seagate drive is pretty slow under steady writes, even if they're sequential. HGST's host managed SMR is different though and even WD and Toshiba are likely taking there paths. There's not just one flavor of SMR, there are literally dozens of possible ways to implement the technology. We have another piece coming soon on that topic.

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Not all audiences want PMR. Those who need capacity, which this 2.5" is targeted to, care more about size than performance in most cases.

I don't understand what you're asking in relation to the HGST drive.

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the technology is standard Perpendicular Magnetic Recording (PMR) as opposed to the newer Shingled Magnetic Recording (SMR) drives that are starting to come to market.

Brian, all I wanted to say is that the statement quoted only uses "newer" to differentiate between PMR and SMR. This could imply to some readers that SMR is inherently better, because that's what mostly happens in the computing world if something new comes along. We both know this is not that case, as both technologies will continue to rightfully coexist for some time. And even with heat assistance you can shingle your data or not, with the same performance implications. The only reason to drop non-shingled HDDs completely would be a competing technique (like some kind of non-volatile solid state storage) achieving near-parity with non-shingled disks in terms of price per storage space.

The note on the new Toshiba doesn't need to discuss this. I just wanted to point out a possible problem with the current formulation.

MrS

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Fair enough. My intent was to show newer high capacity technology, perhaps we will add that for clarity.

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