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Hrafn

Seagate 8TB SMR as video library

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As well as 'cold storage' archives, it would be interesting to see how suitable these disks are for a home computer's 'video library' -- which would generally consist of large sequential files, which would generally be created and deleted as a single unit, but whose timeframes may be more likely to be months (movies) or days (this week's television programmes) rather than a true cold storage scenario.

This would also make the size of the rewriting 'bands' a matter of interest. If relatively small (64-100MB) this should not adversely affect the drive's usage for this purpose, if significantly larger (e.g. 1GB), it might (moving the driver closer to purist Write-Once-Read-Many in its utilisation).

I look forward to reading the review.

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The issue to consider though is how the drives are grouped, if at all. In RAID, we have serious concerns about rebuild time due to the severe write penalty. As a single drive with redundant copies, as in your example, is a better use case probably for client use. The active archive guys address the need by keeping heavily redundant copies of data and aren't reliant an traditional RAID architectures. Long term though, there are serious implications as capacity grows for storage arrays using RAID.

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Well, even single drive benchmarks directly connected via SATA would be awesome, if that's allowed. Actually I would prefer them but that's just me. :P

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Yeah - I know...we have all the RAID data (which of course is not the right use case) and are working up single drive data and attempting a use case with Veeam. If you have something specific, let me know and we can help. If that's the case I'll fragment this out into its own thread.

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I think my home video library case covers my specific interest -- 'cool' (a reasonable amount of turnover, so not-quite-cold) storage of largish (100MB+) files. Generally redundency would be a depreciated issue, as files tend to be non-unique and can be restored by re-ripping from optical media and/or redownloading in the case of disk failure. I would suspect that such usage would predominate multi-TB disks in home computers (it's quite difficult to fill them up otherwise).

Beyond that, I think there's a general interest in finding out how much of a limitation the drive's unique technology places on its utilisation. Database and RAID setups that require constant writing are clearly right out, but there's a wide continuum between that and the opposite extreme, using it as essentially a pseudo-tape-drive for pure cold storage and/or backup. There certainly seems to be quite a bit of buzz (as well as confusion/nervousness) from NAS-related forums about this drive.

I'd also mention that nobody appears to have done a serious review of this drive as yet. I suspect that quite a number of people may be holding off on buying one until an expert has put it through its paces.

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Fair enough. I think the challenge for your use case is addressing them individually and redundancy. In your case it's not a big deal but many will want to figure a path to replication which is hard.

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Here's a data point to consider. This is the backup job from Veeam. Pay attention to the starting point on the graph, the cliff where it falls out and the more or less steady state, which is very similar behavior to an SSD.

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Anyone have a bunch of these in a RAID 5? I'm curious how long it would take to restore 40TB of storage to a large RAID configuration. I have an LSI controller. With my current 6TB drives I get about 80% utilization of my 10Gb network and it stays pretty steady (sure some peaks and valleys due to file size, fragmentation and placement).

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Aren't SMR models sold as external drives already?

Or does the Seagate STDT8000200 contain a different hard drive?

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