clinger

Samsung 2TB SSD: when?

37 posts in this topic

The number we hear frequently is about a month before an unpowered drive may start to lose data.

On the data backup issue, the cloud or active archive probably takes over for tape. Very few are making new investments in tape libraries.

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I missed this earlier. Last time I checked, I couldn't find a decay rate for unpowered SSDs. And to my knowledge, they aren't on a refresh strobe like DRAM. Is this for real - has a data decay lifetime been established for SSDs on the shelf?

I don't think manufacturers like to publish that data but some studies have shown anything from 3 months to a year (and apparently, enterprise drives are worse) depending on temperature conditions.

Traditionally they don't refresh strobe but I suspect Samsung's firmware update to fix performance issues with old data does exactly that.

I have to ask, though .... In mission-critical applications, are many organizations really using HDD for long term offline storage? I'm thinking tape is still king for things like corporate backups, archiving and similar applications.

Eventually, once flash memory becomes cheap enough, hard drives will vanish. There will just be very little reason for them to exist. It certainly won't be for mass storage applications. There's virtually no way that HDDs will increase in data density as quickly as flash. Indeed, with 16TB 2.5" SSDs available today, SSDs have already surpassed mechanical drives in storage density per unit volume.

I dunno. There's new technologies on the horizon (HAMR, SMR, etc) due to increase hard drive capacities while simultaneously SSDs and silicon fabrication in general is hitting the limit ~10nm node size and are requiring new technology as well (3D-Nand, NVRAM). Sure SSDs have more flexibility right now as they don't currently take up any more than a fraction of their physical space inside their chassis, whereas HDDs don't have much physical space to expand. But controller limitations et. al. tend to limit the amount of raw NAND dies you can pack inside a box.

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The capacity has never been a problem. People willing to pay for volume shipments of capacity is. Anything you see be it 16TB or any other number is somewhat arbitrary.

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Is this for real - has a data decay lifetime been established for SSDs on the shelf?

JEDEC spec for unpowered SSD retention isn't the same as data decay lifetime, but since I've already dug it up...

http://www.anandtech.com/show/9248/the-truth-about-ssd-data-retention

For drives that are worn out-- estimated wear left per drive spec (and reported via SMART) is zero:

Client SSD: 30C ambient, 1 year.

Enterprise SSD: 40C ambient, 3 months.

There's some nice charts showing temperature vs. time relationships in there as well.

Given we know that modern SSDs can run way, way past their specified lifetimes... quoted from the same link::

Remember that the figures presented here are for a drive that has already passed its endurance rating, so for new drives the data retention is considerably higher, typically over ten years for MLC NAND based SSDs.

Micron states similar:

http://www.micron.com/about/blogs/2015/may/addressing-data-retention-in-ssds

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i have a 1tb ssd on my laptop and 1tb hybrid for storage sometimes I'm using around 700gigs on the ssd and there are no games, mostly music production stuff like logic, sony sound forge, MPC and that lot. i can get it down to about 500gigs by moving things to storage every time it gets messy.

so really one tb is minimum for my laptop.

now on my desktop i have just under 2 tb's of hdd all games about just over 200 titles. i have a quad core 8gig of corsair memory and a 4 gig readon, i gave you the details because I'm seeing more and more game titles with increasingly long loading screens and i am getting the feeling gaming in the not distant future is going to be aimed at ssd card users with dam long load screen unless you have a ssd card. theres no way i can put any game in storage, thats nuts.

even today some gaming transitions have me sitting for upto one minute and I'm sure I'm not the only one as my desktop isn't really that bad and that shouldn't be happening, ever.

weather you believe it or not, that is aimed at ssd loading times already.

i said all that cus I'm waiting on a 2tb card that is not in the 700pound range. and more in the 300pound range oh well.

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FYI, if you use steam(maybe the other digital distribution software aswell ) on your desktop, you can install your games to different locatiosn. So it might be easier to get get multiple SSDs instead of waiting for 2TB to drop in price. It just recently dropped to 600USD for Black Friday.

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Eventually, once flash memory becomes cheap enough, hard drives will vanish. There will just be very little reason for them to exist. It certainly won't be for mass storage applications. There's virtually no way that HDDs will increase in data density as quickly as flash. Indeed, with 16TB 2.5" SSDs available today, SSDs have already surpassed mechanical drives in storage density per unit volume.

My prediction was this would happen before 2020. Since this year I can order a 2 TB 2.5" 7mm flash drive for below 650 €. That's impressive (price-wise) and already on par with HDDs space-wise (the now available 4TB 2.5" HDDs are 15mm thick)

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Please forgive me if this Press Release has already been mentioned above:

http://www.tomsitpro.com/articles/samsung-ssd-pm1633a-sas-tb,1-3189.html

Samsung Flaunts SAS Power With 15.63 TB SSD

Samsung managed to cram 15.63 TB of storage into the 2.5" form factor, albeit with a 15mm Z-height (thickness). To put this into perspective, there is not a 3.5" HDD, nor an HDD of any size for that matter, that provides as much storage capacity.

[end quote]

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More discussion of the PM1633 here:

http://www.tomsitpro.com/articles/samsung-sm953-pm1725-pm1633-pm1633a,1-2805.html

The PM1633a is the talk of the town, largely because it is the single highest-capacity SSD of any ilk on the market.

This statement includes PCIe SSDs and HDDs of all varieties, which is a true testament to the engineering effort that went into the SSD.

[end quote]

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