eshap

Opinion on Toshiba 3.5" HDDs?

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What do you think of Toshiba 3.5" drives?

The HDD market is in an unfortunate state. I can get basic Seagate drives with 3 years warranty, but my impression is that Seagate are the least reliable (the Backblaze stats contribute to this notion as well). Western Digital doesn't have non-expensive 7200rpm, nor 3 years warranty. Toshiba is only 2 years warranty, but 7200rpm, and superficially don't seem unreliable, unlike Seagate. If their 3.5" line is in fact based off of HGST's HDD lines, which Toshiba bought from WDC, then reliability should be good, though it will be the first time I get an IBM-legacy drive since the Dethstars. :)

Edited by eshap

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I'm giving Toshibas a try, but got mine too recently for valid stats. No breakdowns so far, sample size of 3 and duration of a couple weeks.

My reasons for trying Toshiba are slightly different from yours. I don't want to reward the Duopoly for gobbling up Maxtor/Samsung/HGST then failing to compete with each other. Prices have fallen very slowly since they consolidated, except those segments Toshiba has competed in.

And I'm annoyed with WD marketing. Witholding basic drive stats (intellipower!) when they are not complimentary. And Seagate reliability, plus how they handled the 7200.11 disaster. Where Seagate initially deleted customer discussions off their support boards, only later 'fessing up about the failure reasons.

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I have 2 of them - one is DT01ACA200 (2TB, 7200rpm) and the other is DT01ABA200 (2TB, 5700rpm). ACA200 has 3600 power on hours and ABA200 has 2800. Both are running fine and with no problems for now.

I don't understand why WD doesn't make bigger (than 1TB) 3.5" Blue drives. I have always considered the Blue drives to be their standard 7200rpm desktop hdds.

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Running 2 of the 500 GB, 7.2k rpm Toshibas at work. So far they have been pretty unremarkable, which is good for a solid work-horse drive.

One exception is this: one of them is actually my desktop HDD now, cached by a 60 GB Agility III using SRT in full performance mode. The setup is pretty much the same I was using before with a 640 GB Black (died) and a Seagate Desktop 3 TB at home. The strange thing about the Toshiba: when transferring sequential data over USB 2 at a modest 30 MB/s the HDD is already maxed out, leaving the system in a very unresponsive state. It's strange, the HDD should easily handle this, but it has happened twice so far.

MrS

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Any drive is Raid capable :)

Some are a bit more specialized, though. Features for Raid, which much more expensive drives have, are: vibration compensation for many-drive installations and a short "error timeout", so that the drive will not try to read some sector for as long as regular consumer drives. Instead it just fails and lets the Raid controller get the data from another drive. Otherwise Raid controllers would think the drive has gone bad and will drop it from the array, claiming it to be defective. It sounds really stupid that even after 30+ years of HDD and protocol experience the Raid controller can still not distingush between a searching drive and a faulty one. Or to simply interrupt such a lengthy "bad sector retrieval". So basically if you buy an expensive Raid drive, all you pay for is a different parameter setting in the firmware.

MrS

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What's better than forcing users to buy new drives for each combination of possible firmware settings?

We need 3rd party, open source, HDD firmware.

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My three are in a RAID 0, but it's an OS X software raid. I suspect it's implemented with forgiving error recovery, same as solo desktop drive usage.

No issues so far, for whatever that is worth.

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