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sephroth777

You guys now have me all confused!!! HA HA...

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Now is it better to only have one HD say a SCSI one and put everything on it (all files) or one SCSI one IDE and spilt up the storage?

which would give you better performance?

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SCSI/IDE combo....WAYYYY better. My current system, SCSI boot drive (like..99.9% of the time, sometimes used for storage since I don't really use much of it. Almost 12 GB free out of 18 GB). And my 40 GB IDE, has about like...3GB left...lol...

My IDE drive is used for everything else, because if my OS drive got hit with a virus, it's easy to isolate it. If you have EVERYTHING on one disk or either kind, then...it's just a recipe for problems later....especially if you get hit BAD with a nasty virus. (I've seen one that would take ALL of your media files and turn them into ALL VBS scripts....I laughed my ass off cuz it wasn't my system...but then I had to fix it anyways.)

If you don't really NEED the SCSI, after having a SCSI system in mine, I could honestly say that I would have settled for an IDE/IDE combo. And that way, I could have probably gotten like a 20 GB/80GB or something....just...something else besides the setup that I currently have. Originally, I thought that I would have much more of a use for it, but...now..it's obvious that I really don't. At least not really.

P.S. throwing everything on your SCSI drive is a bad idea if you're thinking of running Windows XP (re: Terrible SCSI Performance in WinXP)

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regarding the SCSI IDE combo how does CPU usage work cause I have always heard it is better to have just SCSI cause it takes a less hit on your CPU work? And it is better to have apps/os/games on SCSI and IDE store mp3/downloads/etc....which combo works best?

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the way that I have my system set up right now, ONLY the O/S is on the SCSI drive. The IDE takes everything else, mp3s, downloads, apps, games, you name it.

Pretty much anything that's NOT OS related (with the exception of the install CDs - I copied my setup CDs onto my IDE drive, that way, if I hafta reset my system from scratch, everything would pretty much be done with my IDE drive.)

In terms of CPU usage, you may or may not find it a little slow on startup because everything's trying to get loaded. Of course, the time and the speed is directly proportional to the amount of stuff that the system has to go through, as well as, "the length of the startup script". (Not that there's an actual script or anything, but I think that you know what I mean when I say that though, or at least I hope you do.)

Other than that, the CPU usage for games are always peaked anyways, because it has to process the game as well as loading it. In terms of applications, the CPU will be used quite a bit as your drive is loading the app. For me, mine goes by rather quickly. (IBM 40GB IDE - though a lot of people are saying that the IBM drives are lemons now.) SCSI does take less hit on the CPU (and some people would argue as to how I measure that, but I just use the Windows XP Task Manager.) In any case, I think that SCSI drives don't get the read/write transfer rates that the IDE can give.

If you have a large enough IDE drive, you can pretty much keep it to a small SCSI boot drive, and everything-else on the IDE. Or...if you're lucky enough, you can get two smaller IDE drives (say 2 x 40GB as opposed to 1 x 80GB) and that way you'd be able to get better access patterns. Probably it would also help if you motherboard has dual-ATA/100 (minimum) channels. i.e. that is both your primary and secondary IDE channels support ATA/100/133. (Depending on the board that you get). That way, if you DO get 2 IDE drives, you'd be able to put them on separate channels and that would probably help with speed as well.

Like I said before, the BIGGEST, main reason why my system is set up that way, is because if I should ever get hit with a virus or something, it can easily be contained to one drive. Typically, it would be my SCSI drive that get's affected, so all I have to do to isolate it, is to shutdown the system, unplug the power to the IDE, and it's isolated. After I wipe it clean with FDISK and format, then I replug the IDE drive, and the installation process begins.

Bottom line: SCSI for OS. Too slow for anything else, great as a swap drive when you need the extra space. Or if you're moving stuff around....

Also, the SCSI drive's great if you're compressing videos, or rendering CG stuff, cuz then having it write to the SCSI drives would let your CPU do more of the real work rather than handling I/O requests.

IDE for everything else: performance exceeds SCSI (especially in multiple I/O operations (which is probably like..90% of the time)) and SCSI in XP doesn't get great scores. Also provides some kind of security measure again viruses, trojans, etc etc.

I have seen the Maxtors and they're alright performers. Although it was in a single-drive environment, where everything was thrown together, I'm just curious how well that drive would perform if it didn't have the O/S on the same disk. I've yet to see the WDs in action, as well as the other SCSI drives that are mentioned here in the forums.

Hope this helps

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Now those I recommend running in RAID 0. I prefer to have many quiet fans moving the same amount of air as few large ones. This also provides fault tolerance.

BTW I'm not kidding.

I think you mispoke. RAID 0 does not provide fault tolerance. You probably run your fans in RAID1. :P

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I guess you will have to count me among the statistical few. This computer is used for gaming and surfing. I went from a FB LM+ to a 1st Gen X15. Everything was faster, boots, level loads, everything. I recently replaced it with a D740X. The D740X is slower.

Irrelevant facts to my decision were:

The D740X is larger. I wasn't running out of room.

The D740X is quieter. The X15 mixed with my case to give off some wicked harmonics. This was a big enough reason to move it out of the bedroom but not enough reason to sell it.

The D740X is cooler. The X15 wasn't overheating so this didn't bother me.

Relevant Facts:

The D740X is not that much slower. I rarely shut my machine down (months of uptime) so increased booting speed is not a problem. With enough RAM I/You won't hit the swap file a significant number of times.

The D740X is much less money. I could nearly buy three D740Xs for the same price and still get a slightly bigger drive.

I will soon be selling the X15 and then have no SCSI left in my system. This was my first foray into SCSI beyond my SCSI-II tape drive.

sephroth777, I would suggest that you start with IDE so that you have something current to comare the SCSI to when you dive in. There is low barrier to entry and you get to see for yourself. The Bigfoot is not just an old, slow drive. It was slow when it was introduced. Floppies might be faster. :)

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I have noticed pretty much everyone here supports the IDE over the SCSI HDs so if I follow the IDE route to start any suggestions on a new CDRW? and what is this MT. Rainer format?

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