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alpinenuss

RAID 0 (Stripe) ARRAY Status Failed Problem

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I have a Dell Studio XPS 435 MT desktop PC (Vista HP 64 Bit, I7 CPU, 8 GB RAM bought in 2006) running Intel Matrix Storage Manager to provide RAID 0 (Stripe) with two 500 GB SATA hard drives. Yesterday a friend tried to add a USB3.0 PCIe card to the mobo and the PC subsequently threw a wobbly and refused to start, displaying the Status of Failed for the RAID array. The two volumes are displayed as Volume 0: Member Disk and Volume 1: Non-RAID disk which doesn't sound right. From what I can tell the two hard drives are Ok but probably have corrupt files meaning that the array setup has been damaged in some way.

From my own limited knowledge of RAID I believe there is no option to rebuild the array with this RAID choice. Does anyone know of any way I can get the data off either one of these disks? Would it be feasible or even possible to run chkdsk /r to try and fix the corrupted files that were damaged after the failed hardware card install?

Unfortunately, there is a lot of data on the drive(s) that has never been backed up! :(

Any advice / suggestions gratefully received.

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Try QueTek's "File Scavenger" (you will need the RAID capable version). It can attempt file recovery on broken RAID arrays. I believe you can download a free trial that will find anything that can be recovered, so you don't have to pay for it if it turns out not to work for you.

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You could attempt to recreate the array WITHOUT initializing it. However, I'd go with what dietrc said. I've always used R-Stuido for file recovery. Unfortunately, I have zero experience using linux software with disk/file recovery... I guess I'm waiting for the... opportunity.

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Thanks dietrc70. QueTek came good after I managed to work out the correct RAID Array parameters (using ReclaiMe Free RAID Recovery). Got all data back, rebuilt array, re-installed Windows and now up and running again. Excellent advice!

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Thanks dietrc70. QueTek came good after I managed to work out the correct RAID Array parameters (using ReclaiMe Free RAID Recovery). Got all data back, rebuilt array, re-installed Windows and now up and running again. Excellent advice!

That's great news! Thanks for the update.

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Just had a similar problem. My partner's PC with RAID 0 storage died with MoBo failure - nothing backed up and in panic mode (partner that is not the PC!) I know of all the problems with retrieving RAID 0 data and thought I was in for the long haul in rebuilding everything and getting the data off. Mr Google came up with several options all sounding very complex and time consuming or should she send it off for commercial data recovery at huge cost? Eventually went for the ReclaiMe software mentioned earlier. I connected up the two RAID disks to spare SATA slots on a reasonably powerful PC - There weren't enough power cables so I just connected the drive power to the PSU outlets of another PC. The free software took quite a while scanning the disks and eventually came up with the array parameter - couldn't beleive it really! We were just looking to get all the data copied on to a drive that can then be used with a new system. Coupled up a 2TB external USB for this and purchased the RecleimME file standard software to save on time. It took all the array data from the free software scanned the disks and eventually rebuilt the full flle system. Left it running (2 days) in Save mode and eventually all copied across and ready for use. Amazing! Software seemed pricey but what a time saving.

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You didn't mention the size of your VISTA C: partition.

For many years now, we've been running with a

C: partition dedicated to system and application software

sized no larger than 50GB. The remainder of each

RAID-0 array is dedicated to data storage, usually E:

after D: is assigned to an optical drive. On the rare

occasion when we need to restore a drive image of C:,

the restore task usually completes without a hitch.

Most recently, we have been upgrading our workstations

so that a secondary drive, or array, is likewise formatted

with the first partition sized exactly the same as C: .

PartitionWizard freeware has a "Migrate OS" feature that

works great, as long as the target drive is empty starting out.

In this way, we have redundant copies of the OS

which are both bootable with a simple change

in the BIOS boot disk setting.

As a general rule, you should ALWAYS backup a RAID-0 array,

particularly if you are hosting an OS on that array.

It's much easier to do maintenance on a RAID array

if it's NOT hosting the OS.

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