Pirate43

Is it time to replace my SSD?

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Hello, everyone. I'm new here.

SSD in question: Intel SSDSA2MH160G1GC 160GB

First some background.

For the longest time (more than 1 year), my desktop was performing very poorly. Apps would randomly freeze but continue working after a little bit, never more than a full minute of frozen time. It had an AMD Thuban 6-core processor, 4GB of DDR2 (I know), a respectable graphics card, and this SSD. At first, I thought my very old RAM was going bad, so I saved up enough money to buy a new DDR3 compatible motherboard, new RAM and a new processor. Performance noticeably increased, and the freezing is much less frequent now, but it still happens. Therefore, I shifted my attention to the SSD, and saw the SMART Data. Here it is below.

11k895j.png

So the question is, is it time to replace it? I notice some of the values look absurdly high like the power on count and hours. All advise is appreciated.

Thanks,

Pirate43

Edited by Pirate43

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I dont think the values are high. My OCZ SSD has near that(670 power at maybe less than a year) and people in the below thread should have a great deal more.

How many Terabytes have been written to your SSD?(POLL!)

First, confirm the information with the Intel Toolbox.

http://downloadcenter.intel.com/Detail_Desc.aspx?agr=Y&DwnldID=18455

Second, check for firmware updates(the toolbox should be able to do that). Note: back up any important data before doing a firmware update.

Also, what operating system are you using? I see that Trim which can help with performance is not enable(double check with the Intel Toolbox).

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I dont think the values are high. My OCZ SSD has near that(670 power at maybe less than a year) and people in the below thread should have a great deal more.

How many Terabytes have been written to your SSD?(POLL!)

First, confirm the information with the Intel Toolbox.

http://downloadcenter.intel.com/Detail_Desc.aspx?agr=Y&DwnldID=18455

Second, check for firmware updates(the toolbox should be able to do that). Note: back up any important data before doing a firmware update.

Also, what operating system are you using? I see that Trim which can help with performance is not enable(double check with the Intel Toolbox).

Thanks for the reply!

I did as you asked, and here is the SMART Data with Intel SSD Toolbox. It claims the drive health is good, but the unsafe shutdowns and powercycles are what have me worried. The firmware is the latest and TRIM is enabled. I am using Windows 7 Professional right now, but the problem also has occurred on Ultimate, both 64-bit. SSD Toolbox Screenshot attached.

post-78956-0-50377500-1349637832_thumb.p

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Your SSD is fine, the most important of all the SMART values in your case, the wear out indicator, is 0. This means not even a single block has been worn out and remapped to reserve space yet.

I'd look more at your SATA cable, drivers, and other background apps you may have running, since you've already replaced the mobo, CPU and RAM.

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Your SSD is fine, the most important of all the SMART values in your case, the wear out indicator, is 0. This means not even a single block has been worn out and remapped to reserve space yet.

I'd look more at your SATA cable, drivers, and other background apps you may have running, since you've already replaced the mobo, CPU and RAM.

The sata cable i'm using post-new-mobo is different too. Perhaps there's some misbehaving driver somewhere, as that really seems to be the only other option.

Thanks for the advise!

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Hi, I also have a Thuban 6-core system but have never experienced skipping or stuttering. As a point of reference, I've had my system 23 months, and use all 8 SATA ports - the 6 SATA3 ports from AMD 880G/SB850 chipset and the 2 SATA2 ports from JMicron onboard add-on controller. I have 4 SSDs, 3 spinners, and a DVDRW hooked up. I've always used the AMD AHCI/SATA drivers. I've tested/benchmarked with the MS standard AHCI drivers and didn't notice stuttering with them either, but I haven't used them for day-to-day stuff. The AMD drivers always seemed to provide better numbers for me with possible exception of sequential transfer rates. What are you using? It's pretty easy to flip your SATA/AHCI driver back and forth in Windows Device Manager, so you may want to experiment briefly. I don't think it's time to replace your SSD unless you just want to.

I built a Llano-based office PC in July 2011 when it came out, and it did stutter sometimes when it was new. After a few months it went away and to this day cannot be reproduced. I suspect either a BIOS, driver, or SSD firmware update did the trick. You may want to double-check those three items. And of course, make sure in your BIOS or UEFI that your onboard SATA controllers are set to AHCI mode. SSD performance in IDE mode suffers greatly. You can check in your recent Windows OS if TRIM is being passed to your drives by opening a command prompt administratively, and typing

fsutil behavior query disabledeletenotify

If it returns a 0, you should be set up for TRIM.

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And of course, make sure in your BIOS or UEFI that your onboard SATA controllers are set to AHCI mode. SSD performance in IDE mode suffers greatly. You can check in your recent Windows OS if TRIM is being passed to your drives by opening a command prompt administratively, and typing

fsutil behavior query disabledeletenotify

If it returns a 0, you should be set up for TRIM.

It returned a zero. I'm really convinced it's a RAM problem at this point though, since blue screens have started showing their ugly faces with messages like cache_fault and page_fault_in_nonpaged_area (not exact, but something along those lines).

Edited by Pirate43

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You probably just need to secure erase the drive and reinstall from scratch.

Note that secure erase is different from a normal format!

If that doesn't correct it, then maybe a new drive is a consideration.

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