Brian

Western Digital Red NAS Hard Drive Review Discussion

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So these are just Greens with the firmware limitations reversed?
Greens only go up to 750GB/platter, so it seems likely these are the next generation of 5400rpm drives from WD.

Of course, knowing WD, it is entirely possible they've updated the Greens from 750GB/platter to 1TB/platter without changing the model number that is decipherable to consumers. :angry:

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Great review! I just mentioned these a couple of days ago in my podcast and now I've updated the post to include a link to your review.

I've been wanting to build a small home file server for a while and these drives just went to the top of my list. For what I want the "performance per watt" is more important than raw speed. I realize these are designed around traditional "RAID" but would there be any downside to using them with a non-RAID array? I'm looking at using Lime Technologies unRaid product and it works more like JBOD than RAID.

Thanks!

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Thanks for the review!

I wonder if you have the drives available?

A print out with Smartmontools will confirm TLER or not: smartctl -l scterc,70,70 /dev/xxx

I contacted WD Support asking for TLER support (since my WD Greens fails hard in my HW-raidcontroller with lack of TLER)

Read all about that here: http://lars.werner.no/?p=841

Hopefully someone who have a WD Red could gives me the thumb up/down...

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A print out with Smartmontools will confirm TLER or not: smartctl -l scterc,70,70 /dev/xxx

]# smartctl -l scterc,70,70 /dev/sda

smartctl 5.42 2011-10-20 r3458 [x86_64-linux-2.6.32-279.el6.x86_64] (local build)

Copyright © 2002-11 by Bruce Allen, http://smartmontools.sourceforge.net

SCT Error Recovery Control set to:

Read: 70 (7.0 seconds)

Write: 70 (7.0 seconds)

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SCT Error Recovery Control set to:

Read: 70 (7.0 seconds)

Write: 70 (7.0 seconds)

Great DDX!

Finally some hard evidence of TLER presence!

I guess it is the default setup value you showed?

Do you have a complete SMART list from that drive (using the --all option)?

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I think it is the default since the value stays 70 after a power cycle.

Full smartctl -all output :

]# smartctl --all /dev/sda

smartctl 5.42 2011-10-20 r3458 [x86_64-linux-2.6.32-279.2.1.el6.x86_64] (local build)

Copyright © 2002-11 by Bruce Allen, http://smartmontools.sourceforge.net

=== START OF INFORMATION SECTION ===

Device Model: WDC WD30EFRX-68AX9N0

Serial Number: <serial>

LU WWN Device Id: 5 0014ee 058af9080

Firmware Version: 80.00A80

User Capacity: 3,000,592,982,016 bytes [3.00 TB]

Sector Sizes: 512 bytes logical, 4096 bytes physical

Device is: Not in smartctl database [for details use: -P showall]

ATA Version is: 8

ATA Standard is: ACS-2 (revision not indicated)

Local Time is: Wed Aug 8 16:05:19 2012 CEST

SMART support is: Available - device has SMART capability.

SMART support is: Enabled

=== START OF READ SMART DATA SECTION ===

SMART overall-health self-assessment test result: PASSED

General SMART Values:

Offline data collection status: (0x00) Offline data collection activity

was never started.

Auto Offline Data Collection: Disabled.

Self-test execution status: ( 0) The previous self-test routine completed

without error or no self-test has ever

been run.

Total time to complete Offline

data collection: (40680) seconds.

Offline data collection

capabilities: (0x7b) SMART execute Offline immediate.

Auto Offline data collection on/off support.

Suspend Offline collection upon new

command.

Offline surface scan supported.

Self-test supported.

Conveyance Self-test supported.

Selective Self-test supported.

SMART capabilities: (0x0003) Saves SMART data before entering

power-saving mode.

Supports SMART auto save timer.

Error logging capability: (0x01) Error logging supported.

General Purpose Logging supported.

Short self-test routine

recommended polling time: ( 2) minutes.

Extended self-test routine

recommended polling time: ( 255) minutes.

Conveyance self-test routine

recommended polling time: ( 5) minutes.

SCT capabilities: (0x70bd) SCT Status supported.

SCT Error Recovery Control supported.

SCT Feature Control supported.

SCT Data Table supported.

SMART Attributes Data Structure revision number: 16

Vendor Specific SMART Attributes with Thresholds:

ID# ATTRIBUTE_NAME FLAG VALUE WORST THRESH TYPE UPDATED WHEN_FAILED RAW_VALUE

1 Raw_Read_Error_Rate 0x002f 100 253 051 Pre-fail Always - 0

3 Spin_Up_Time 0x0027 100 253 021 Pre-fail Always - 0

4 Start_Stop_Count 0x0032 100 100 000 Old_age Always - 3

5 Reallocated_Sector_Ct 0x0033 200 200 140 Pre-fail Always - 0

7 Seek_Error_Rate 0x002e 100 253 000 Old_age Always - 0

9 Power_On_Hours 0x0032 100 100 000 Old_age Always - 1

10 Spin_Retry_Count 0x0032 100 253 000 Old_age Always - 0

11 Calibration_Retry_Count 0x0032 100 253 000 Old_age Always - 0

12 Power_Cycle_Count 0x0032 100 100 000 Old_age Always - 3

192 Power-Off_Retract_Count 0x0032 200 200 000 Old_age Always - 2

193 Load_Cycle_Count 0x0032 200 200 000 Old_age Always - 0

194 Temperature_Celsius 0x0022 117 114 000 Old_age Always - 33

196 Reallocated_Event_Count 0x0032 200 200 000 Old_age Always - 0

197 Current_Pending_Sector 0x0032 200 200 000 Old_age Always - 0

198 Offline_Uncorrectable 0x0030 100 253 000 Old_age Offline - 0

199 UDMA_CRC_Error_Count 0x0032 200 200 000 Old_age Always - 0

200 Multi_Zone_Error_Rate 0x0008 100 253 000 Old_age Offline - 0

SMART Error Log Version: 1

No Errors Logged

SMART Self-test log structure revision number 1

No self-tests have been logged. [To run self-tests, use: smartctl -t]

SMART Selective self-test log data structure revision number 1

SPAN MIN_LBA MAX_LBA CURRENT_TEST_STATUS

1 0 0 Not_testing

2 0 0 Not_testing

3 0 0 Not_testing

4 0 0 Not_testing

5 0 0 Not_testing

Selective self-test flags (0x0):

After scanning selected spans, do NOT read-scan remainder of disk.

If Selective self-test is pending on power-up, resume after 0 minute delay.

Edited by ddx

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I think it is the default since the value stays 70 after a power cycle.

Great, you have answered what WD Support couldn't!

I'll update my blog based on this information, thank you!

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Can someone please explain the power consumption results. Why is there a different figure for 5v and 12v?

Is the total power consumption the sum of 5v and 12v?

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Hi All,

New to this Forum, but have 1 question regarding these HDD's.

Did storage review happen to perform a audio test? if the marketing blurb is to be believed, 4 RED drives running in a 4 bay NAS should be quieter than 4 Greens. could be a worth while test.

Regards,

Dan

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Hi All,

New to this Forum, but have 1 question regarding these HDD's.

Did storage review happen to perform a audio test? if the marketing blurb is to be believed, 4 RED drives running in a 4 bay NAS should be quieter than 4 Greens. could be a worth while test.

Regards,

Dan

We don't do audio tests...just haven't found a justification for the cost of making a soundproof room to complete such testing.

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Can someone please explain the power consumption results. Why is there a different figure for 5v and 12v?

Is the total power consumption the sum of 5v and 12v?

3.5" hard drives us power on both the 5v and 12v rails, generally for the motor and then the electronics. We lost power used from both throughout the usage patterns, as well as aggregate so users can size the power demands from these drives. Note that both 5v and 12v power is required simultaneously, without one being optional. Hope this helps to answer your question.

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Hi All,

New to this Forum, but have 1 question regarding these HDD's.

Did storage review happen to perform a audio test? if the marketing blurb is to be believed, 4 RED drives running in a 4 bay NAS should be quieter than 4 Greens. could be a worth while test.

Regards,

Dan

Fair play thanks for the reply

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3.5" hard drives us power on both the 5v and 12v rails, generally for the motor and then the electronics. We lost power used from both throughout the usage patterns, as well as aggregate so users can size the power demands from these drives. Note that both 5v and 12v power is required simultaneously, without one being optional. Hope this helps to answer your question.

Unfortunately it doesn't. I already knew that HDD take power from both the 5v and 12v rails. My question is what those confusing charts mean.

The charts show a bar inside a bar, with the inner bar having a specific voltage and wattage.

Is the drive's actual consumption the sum of the two bars?

Edited by taltamir

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Hello,

since this drive is meant to be used in 24/7 situations, it would be great if there could be temperature testing done.

skipR

Hi, I have 8x 3TB RED's running, all at 30-33C (86-91F) running 24/7 and its summer here, Western Australia.

i hope this helps

Henrik

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Unfortunately it doesn't. I already knew that HDD take power from both the 5v and 12v rails. My question is what those confusing charts mean.

The charts show a bar inside a bar, with the inner bar having a specific voltage and wattage.

Is the drive's actual consumption the sum of the two bars?

so, anyone knows the answer to this question?

How do you read those confusing charts?

Is the drive's total consumption the sum of the two bars?

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The bottom number is usually (or always) the 5V wattage. If you look at the scale of things, you can tell that the top number is the sum of 5V and 12V wattage. So to get the 12V wattage you do total - 5V wattage.

Edited by danwat1234

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The bottom number is usually (or always) the 5V wattage. If you look at the scale of things, you can tell that the top number is the sum of 5V and 12V wattage. So to get the 12V wattage you do total - 5V wattage.

That is the interpretation I consider most likely but I want official confirmation, as it is not the only interpretation possible.

The main problem with that is that it looks like the top number is labeled as 12v not as total.

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I can confirm that the numbers are represented as individual 5v, and then total. So 12v is Total-5v. I'll see if there is a way to better represent this on the charts going forward, but its balancing increasing bar separation on an already jumbled chart for power.

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I can confirm that the numbers are represented as individual 5v, and then total. So 12v is Total-5v. I'll see if there is a way to better represent this on the charts going forward, but its balancing increasing bar separation on an already jumbled chart for power.

Thank you Kevin.

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So these drives are essentially 5400 rpm; an important fact hidden from the review as well as from the wd website where specs state at the rpm speed "intellipower", read this and weep:

Marketing Crap

A fine-tuned balance of spin speed, transfer rate and caching algorithms designed to deliver both significant power savings and solid performance. For each drive model, WD may use a different, invariable RPM.

Invariable rpm, ie steady rpm which the consumer does not have to know... :blink:

I'll be damned if i put 5400 disks on my arrays...

Edited by silkman

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Testing harddrive performance by inserting them into a Synology NAS is just a joke !!!!

Synology IO performance is HORRIBLE compared to any decent hardware !

in my computer i had 3x WD30EZRX (WD 3 TB Green) in RAID 0 and could read/write at 400/350 MB/s

Raid 5 performance was 350/250 MB/s

Hardware : Core i5 4570, ASUS H87i-PLUS (Intel Raid controller)

on the other hand, running a virtual Synology DSM 4.3 (XPenology) i didn't get the same performance from the same disks. I didn't do a thourough benchmark but the initial speeds was only about 100 MB/s read/write. i'll do a test once i get new disks (WD Green was returned)

Edited by Montago

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So you'd rather not know how NAS drives will perform in a NAS? Appreciate the feedback but I think you're in the minority. We have another forum for site feedback, start a new thread there with your suggestions on improving the reviews and we'll see what we can do.

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All I'm saying is that Synology NAS'es are terrible in IO performance and thus makes the test kind of irrelevant.

Testing with any other harddrives would yield the same result, because the bottleneck is the NAS and not the drives.

Although.. testing in another system would likely also only test the performance of the RAID controller (and subsystem) rather than the drives themselves.

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We see pretty big variation between WD Red, WD Se and Seagate NAS drives in those systems. Since that's where the drives are being marketed, that's why we go that way...we do test single drives outside of those systems though as you saw. We'll keep working on ideas for further expanding testing for these kinds of drives.

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