philipus

Seagate 3TB reliability: Barracuda vs SV35.5

5 posts in this topic

Hi Everyone

I am running out of space in my early 2008 Mac Pro, which currently has 4xWD640AAKS. My eventual goal is to replace all drives by Sata 3.0 drives with 3TB capacity and to install the Newer Technology MAXPower RAID mini-SAS 6G-1e1i card to make full use of the Sata 3.0. Like now I will eventually have two stripes.

However, at present I can only buy two drives.

I was initially interested by the Seagate Barracuda (ST3000DM001) because of the 1TB/platter design. However, then I saw a fairly negative review at Tom's Hardware, specifically concerning the 2400-hour on rating. So I am now wondering how reliable this drive is, esp. since I've seen quite a lot of comments about DOA drives.

Then I saw that Seagate also has a model called SV35.5 drive which is identical to the Barracuda ST including the 1TB/platter design.

http://www.seagate.com/internal-hard-drives/consumer-electronics/sv35/

Seagate has an interesting 7200rpm drive comparison:

http://www.seagate.com/files/www-content/product-content/_cross-product/en-us/docs/7200rpm-drive-spec-mb578-7-1201us.pdf

The SV35.5 is identical to the Constellation drives in terms of Power-on hours (8760 or 24/7). The SV35.5 has an MTBF of 1 million whereas Constellation has 1.2 and 1.4 depending on drive size (3,5" vs 2,5").

Here in Holland the SV35.5 costs 180€ which is 40€ more than the Barracuda ST.

So now I am wondering if the SV35.5 would be better to get than the ST. I would really appreciate any insight into this.

I realise the SV35.5 is meant for video streams but I'm not sure what that means. I would use the drive both for streaming my ripped DVDs over my Apple TV and for photo editing in Photoshop.

A related question -- are we going to see any other 1TB/platter drives from other manufacturers?

Thanks very much in advance

Philip

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ST3000DM001 should be fine... the DOA bitching is not something we've seen here, and considering how badly virtually every major retailer handles drives in their internal picking and packing, I'm not too worried about the drive design itself.

Not sure why Tom's Hardware is bitching about the POH (Power On Hours) rating either, it's something that Hitachi and others have also done for years to differentiate nearline vs. consumer drives in their annualized failure rate calculations.

Reliability-wise I wouldn't expect to see any difference in typical consumer use between the ST3000DM001 and the SV35.5 version. You might see slight performance differences due to firmware tweaks for video surveillance use (more streaming, less random access) but without benchmarks I wouldn't guarantee that.

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ST3000DM001 should be fine... the DOA bitching is not something we've seen here, and considering how badly virtually every major retailer handles drives in their internal picking and packing, I'm not too worried about the drive design itself.

Not sure why Tom's Hardware is bitching about the POH (Power On Hours) rating either, it's something that Hitachi and others have also done for years to differentiate nearline vs. consumer drives in their annualized failure rate calculations.

Reliability-wise I wouldn't expect to see any difference in typical consumer use between the ST3000DM001 and the SV35.5 version. You might see slight performance differences due to firmware tweaks for video surveillance use (more streaming, less random access) but without benchmarks I wouldn't guarantee that.

Thanks very much for the reply, I really appreciate it. It is nice with a bit of a voice of reason approach.

I realise a lot of negative comments one can read online about pretty much anything seems very dominant because people don't post when things work like they should.

Competition-wise I really hope we'll see more multi-TB drives with 1TB/platter soon. Why haven't we already?

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Hi,

Thanks for putting up this post and reply. I needed the information to differentiate the HD brands and versions! Now I know which to get :)

Regards,

ACEDS @ Asia

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If the Hitachi Travelstar drives still hold up as well as these did some years ago than that could be one way to go. I've some experience with these drives and have not found much to complain about. My first was a 40gb 4200rpm with 2mb buffer (forgotten the model number). A good and reliable drive despite a lot of use in at least 6 days in every week. I finally upgraded because I needed more storage but also because I wanted a faster drive. I went for the Travelstar 7k100 with Ide interface, which my laptop had. I also had a look at Seagate, I think it was, and their equivalent 2.5" Momentus 100gb, 7200rpm with 8mb cache but the Hitachi had better read/write performance according to tests if my memory serves me correct, so I went for the Hitachi.

My Hitachi 7k100 is still doing a good job after having seen daily use in first an other laptop which I used every day. It is now sitting in an old laptop which run a gameBot 24/7 and the drive never seems to spin down as it makes a slight ticking noise sometimes. Still working well. I've another Hitachi 7k100 though with Sata interface in an other Core 2 Duo based laptop. Probably the stock drive I would assume as I'm the second owner of that laptop. I'm not using that laptop much but it works whenever I want to use it.

My experience with these older Hitachis is that the general performance was good for the time being and reliability as well.

Edit: Oops. I now see that you are looking for a 3.5" drive. I was thinking about 2.5" as you mentioned the Macbook.

Edited by schaki

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