Brian

OCZ Vertex 4 SSD Review Discussion

12 posts in this topic

Great review!

But with a small error: ;)

In a File Server setting, the 512GB OCZ Vertex 4 stayed ahead of the Vertex 4 MAX IOPS and the Intel SSD 520 with an average speed of 9,460 I/O.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent review, great to see a full gamut of drives and controllers.

Another typo: you write the Plextor M3P as having a capacity of 256MB instead of GB.

Suggestion: I think you should mention that the Octane 4 comes with some DDR3 chips for caching.. what looks like 512MB to me? I presume this helps significantly for it's strong write performance.

All said and done, I think this looks like a solid drive; but I can help but feel the review really highlights how strong the Plextor M3P is for every workload!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Making some corrections now. We were finishing this review at 2am last night out on the road at SNW in Dallas. Thanks for catching those. We are actually making some mid-flight edits right now on our way back to Cincinnati. I'll get the tweaks to the charts rolled out shortly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How nice is it to edit reviews from 34,000 feet? We're just happy to have survived the tornados during SNW really, but thanks for pointing out the fixes ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I noticed the Vertex 4 uses a 512 MB. cache on the 128 GB. drive and that OCZ is claiming closer performance to the 256 GB drive. Latencies are low but performance in real apps. is average, which seems odd to me.

Edited by Beenthere

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1) Vertex 4 benched better than most other drives at IOMETER random 4K reads and writes benchmarks, so I expected it to be the best drives at database benchmark. Yet at the IOMETER database IO benchmark, its performance is very lagging, actually worse than Vertex 3. Why is that?

2) Does it come with any capacitors to protect against crash? Or would I lose/corrupt my data if I lose power?

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. Certain drives excel in a given workload, but start to fall back when both read and write activity is measured together. OCZ has stated firmware updates should improve performance in those areas, but how much is still up in the air until we retest it.

2. Most consumer models outside of the Intel SSD 320 offer minimal power protection. The best setup for a consumer workstation is a battery backup such as a UPS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

is it a pro that performance scales with capacity?

on other brands they get 500meg writes with lower capacities, I expect 90% of ssd sales are sub 200gig models due to cost.

also is there any news on reliabilty? arguably more important than performance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now