alank2

SSD Wear Leveling question...

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Hi,

Are SSD's smart enough to not write the identical data? For example, restoring a partition image might be 10 Gb. If you restore it a second time, will it rewrite all those sectors even though they are the SAME or does it have a mechanism to detect if a write really changes the data or not?

Thanks,

Alan

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Some drives such as those that use SandForce chipsets can do this on a small scale (compress data as its being written to the drive) but nothing at the partition level. If you deleted a partition then wrote it back to the drive, you would be rewriting all of that information to the drive. The only way around it would be using recovery software to undelete it from an outside perspective.

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Hi,

Some drives such as those that use SandForce chipsets can do this on a small scale (compress data as its being written to the drive) but nothing at the partition level. If you deleted a partition then wrote it back to the drive, you would be rewriting all of that information to the drive. The only way around it would be using recovery software to undelete it from an outside perspective.

I typically keep a master image of my C: partition (just programs/os, no data) so I can restore it at any time to get back to a known os/programs state. I guess I was hoping that part of the SSD wear leveling would be to read a sector ahead of time to see if the write request going to that sector was identical, and in that case why rewrite the same data...

Thanks,

Alan

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No, SSDs will rewrite the data.

As long as you are not restoring every day, wear would not be a significant problem though.

Even if you do restore a full drive every day, you will still get at least a decade from a modern SSD before the NAND is worn.

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