Kevin OBrien

OCZ Octane SSD Review

16 posts in this topic

When OCZ bought Indilinx in March this year they not only gained control of some key intellectual property, but they also got one step closer to being able to provide their own in-house SSDs from end to end. OCZ was already using the Indilinx processors in many of their enterprise SSDs so for the bargain price of $32 million, the deal made sense. Now that the Indilinx Everest platform is finding its way to market via integration by OEMs like LG and into client SSDs like the Octane, Indilinx has the potential to give OCZ a huge point of differentiation from nearly everyone else in the market. With the OCZ Octane SSD, the Everest platform promises to deliver read speeds of up to 560 MB/s and writes up to 400 MB/s, depending on capacity.

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When OCZ bought Indilinx in March this year they not only gained control of some key intellectual property, but they also got one step closer to being able to provide their own in-house SSDs from end to end. OCZ was already using the Indilinx processors in many of their enterprise SSDs so for the bargain price of $32 million, the deal made sense. Now that the Indilinx Everest platform is finding its way to market via integration by OEMs like LG and into client SSDs like the Octane, Indilinx has the potential to give OCZ a huge point of differentiation from nearly everyone else in the market. With the OCZ Octane SSD, the Everest platform promises to deliver read speeds of up to 560 MB/s and writes up to 400 MB/s, depending on capacity.

Read Full Review

Weee, faster.

My two concerns are price and reliability. Indilinx barefoot drives weren't known for high reliability

The quote below is from Summer 2010 reliability post I made, data taken from newegg reviews

Indilinx: Note the M225 and Nova complaints are showing up now

Crucial M225 (Indilinx Barefoot) about 15% failure rate.

Corsair Nova (Indilinx Barefoot) about 7% failure rate.

OCZ Vertex and Agility (Indilinx Barefoot) 30-60GB drives (chock full of so many negative reviews I find it hard to categorize them all).

OCZ Agility 120GB retail (Indilinx Barefoot) about 10% failure rate.

Patriot Torqx (Indilinx Barefoot) dead drives approaching the 50% mark.

Since Corsair was able to keep the failure rate lower than the others maybe Indilinx wasn't to blame. We can hope that OCZ will do the right thing and avoid revisiting these sorts of failure rates.

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Well when it comes to reliability, come back and ask me how our drive is doing next year this time ;). Most of the popular drives we use around the office in work/personal computers, NAS units, etc to rack up hours and GB/s of written data. In the span of a review though unless the drive was DOA it probably wouldnt show to us.

But I completely agree that the previous Indilinix controller had some issues, but it was before my time here at StorageReview... so no first hand experience with it.

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I don't think the previous generation controllers should be given any weight with the current Everest platform. It's a totally different entity and the Indilinx team has been given more support to do good things. Time will tell...but we're really hoping that OCZ/Indilinx churns out some great processors.

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Why is there no mention of the "instant on" feature... is it hype? I notice all the reviews don't talk about it which is a bit weird...

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somewhat disappointing review:

The main selling point of the OCZ Octane right now is its price per GB, which undercuts many of the same-capacity SSDs on the market.

Have you even looked @current pricing? It's well higher than what was hyped both here on SR as well as by the 'official' announcement by OCZ...and that 1TB is going to probably be even more expensive/GB than promoted...if and when they ever release it, right now it's vaporware, not what the article is suggesting. Further, there was a 1TB drive announced more than a year ago, not sure if it ever shipped.

Performance, at least as tested by SR is also much lower than pre-release 'hype'. I did not see an OWC 6GB drive in the comparisons...so conclusions in the whole article are dubious at best...kinda like a Consumer Reports article, too few models for comparison, the ones you probably aren't interesting in buying anyway :D

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Thanks for the review, I've been waiting for this one.

I've noticed that none of the reviews have tested capacities other than 512gb. I know the performance gap between the large and small capacities varies between controllers but I was wondering if you have any idea how the smaller capacities perform. Seems almost like OCZ made sure people only got to test the 512gb model.

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@udaman, we use the Max IOPS, which is the fastest overall client SSD we have. We can only fit so many things on the charts, and with the hardware being so similar, does it matter that much to you which ones we use? The 1TB we're told will be shipping in December, at this point we can't know if that's right or not. A little early to be calling vaporware though. As to the pricing, I agree that what OCZ put out there initially was lower than the MSRPs, but we'd expect the MSRPs to be high once the drives are in retail for a bit, just like all the other SSDs in the market.

@geenp - that's what OCZ sent out. We'll endeavor to get the other capacities as well.

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Why is there no mention of the "instant on" feature... is it hype? I notice all the reviews don't talk about it which is a bit weird...

Agreed. This and the dubious technology enhancing write endurance by a factor of 2. If it was any good they'd advertise it as such, wouldn't they?

MrS

Edited by [ETA]MrSpadge

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Kevin,

Nice review. I am interested in the benefits of the 512 MB cache and how well this disk would perform for music recording purposes. Usually in a DAW multiple hard disks are installed, eg OS disk, Audio recording disk, VSTi and Sample libraries disks.Seperated to accomodate higher bandwidth, and better sound quality.

For music production the continuous (or sustained) data transfer is more interesting than the higher random reads and write speeeds. The more bandwidth (higher sustained transfer rates) a disk can accomodate without hiccups, the more tracks are recorded and played back simultaneously withhout audio glitches, and the audio quality is better. Unfortunately no disk review ever covers the use for DAW's, while many recording studio and mastering facilities have been using DAW and harddisk recording for more than a decade.

In your experiences with the OCZ Octane SSD, did you see any improvement in the sustained data transfer? Will this disk be a good choice to replace my current 300 GB Velociraptor or do you recommend other disks for DAW's?

Almost all new X79, H77, Z77 motherboards have 2 Sata600 busses connected to the motherboard chipset and pairs of 2 connected to Marvel chipsets. However trim is only supported on the motherboard chipset connectors. The Marvell Sata 600 busses do not support trim. So how do these disks keep themself healthy in heavy writing and reading environments. Do they have a standalone trim fucntion or garbage collection build in? When trim or the garbage collection is activated, does this affect the sustained read and write data tranfer, will it cause audio glitches?

Although sata 600 disks have been on the market for a couple of years, there are very few good sata 600 controller cards, who deliver the speeds as promised. I think the manufacturares don 't want to sell their products? Not sure what kind of management is overlooking these companies, but most probably are sleeping :).

regards

Syberxa

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What software are you using and do you perhaps know what the workload looks like? Depending on the transfer, if it is even mildly random, a sustained workload on even enterprise-grade SSDs will start slipping compared to a 10k or 15k hard drive.

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I would like to use the 1 tb in my asus zen 32vd ultrabook, replacing my 500 GB hitachi I wonder how high is the board without the plastic case, my hdd bay is 7 mm high

Edited by maxix22

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Storagereview may have already returned the SSD if it was loaned out, but generally, you should be fine making a 9.5mm ssd into a 7mm as long as it is not touching metal or if there aren't thermal pads needed(heat kills).

If it doesn't have a 'warranty void if removed' sticker on the corners/screws in the pictures, you could always buy from a store with a return policy...

Other than that, may I ask why you need 1TB SSD in an ultrabook? Have you considered using an external USB 3.0 hard drive to supplement your needs It should have a usb 3.0 port which should be plenty fast for most things and there are a lot of usb 3.0 storage options in many forms.

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Storagereview may have already returned the SSD if it was loaned out, but generally, you should be fine making a 9.5mm ssd into a 7mm as long as it is not touching metal or if there aren't thermal pads needed(heat kills).

If it doesn't have a 'warranty void if removed' sticker on the corners/screws in the pictures, you could always buy from a store with a return policy...

Other than that, may I ask why you need 1TB SSD in an ultrabook? Have you considered using an external USB 3.0 hard drive to supplement your needs It should have a usb 3.0 port which should be plenty fast for most things and there are a lot of usb 3.0 storage options in many forms.

well i have 700 g of darta that i need always on hand and an external drive would ruin the portability and the purpose of an ultrabook i guess the only option that i have would b the ocz if i manage to squeeze in it

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Keep it plugged in and tape the drive to the back of the lid...should take care of the portability problem :)

At $2250 for a price of 1TB OCZ octane at Newegg, it may make more sense just to buy a real(traditional) notebook assuming the increased weight isn't an issue. For example something like the Lenovo T520/T530 can be had for around $1000 which gives you $1250 to max out the HDD/SSD storage in the HDD bay, Opitical Bay and mSata Slot.

Lenovo ThinkPad T520 Upgrade Guide

Other than that, can you use online storage?

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