GPett

Sadforce vs intel vs PCIe

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Hello,

I am building a new PC. I want to understand how to best choose parts. I have read that I should use the most current intel chipsets controller to best take advantage of the TRIM and AHCI functionality of the current SSDs.

I am confused about the regular SSDs versus the PCIe SSDs. It seems there are new SSDs such as the RevoDrive that use the PCIe interface. If the SSD is PCIe does the motherboard controller still matter?

I have a GTX 480 and I need to purchase everything else. I need a motherboard, powersupply, SSD, memory, and case. The video card was a gift so that I can build a new gaming rig.

So... I guess to clarify. Can someone explain the difference between the new PCIe SSDs and the SATA SSDs. If there is a difference... does the motherboard chipset still matter?

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I haven't jumped in for awhile so here I go. At present, the SATA 3 interface bottlenecks solid state drive performance to somewhere in the area of just over 500MB/s whereas PCI Express does not. A great example of this is the new Revo 3X2 card which will push out performance of 1500MB/s read and 1250MB/s write. Its also my recommendation in the 240GB capacity for what you are building as it simply can't be touched for performance and price right now coming in at less than $700. To date, I also don't know of any problems with the SF-2281 PCIe cards whereas there have been problems experienced with typical SSD form factors.

The trade off between the two is that the 2.5" SSD utilizes TRIM whereas the Revo 3x2 (which uses SCSI) does not however, personally, I think it is a non-issue as a result of the garbage collection seen in SF controlled SSDDs.

Just my thoughts...

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I haven't jumped in for awhile so here I go. At present, the SATA 3 interface bottlenecks solid state drive performance to somewhere in the area of just over 500MB/s whereas PCI Express does not. A great example of this is the new Revo 3X2 card which will push out performance of 1500MB/s read and 1250MB/s write. Its also my recommendation in the 240GB capacity for what you are building as it simply can't be touched for performance and price right now coming in at less than $700. To date, I also don't know of any problems with the SF-2281 PCIe cards whereas there have been problems experienced with typical SSD form factors.

The trade off between the two is that the 2.5" SSD utilizes TRIM whereas the Revo 3x2 (which uses SCSI) does not however, personally, I think it is a non-issue as a result of the garbage collection seen in SF controlled SSDDs.

Just my thoughts...

ok that made sense other than me not knowing the term "SF controlled SSDs". Also, to clarify, with the PCIe SSDs the motherboard chip set does not act as the controller? My gut is yes since that would be the SATA controller? With the PCIe SSDs is an additional controller needed?

Edited by GPett

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ok that made sense other than me not knowing the term "SF controlled SSDs". Also, to clarify, with the PCIe SSDs the motherboard chip set does not act as the controller? My gut is yes since that would be the SATA controller? With the PCIe SSDs is an additional controller needed?

Pretty much every company except for Samsung has invested in SandForce in some way, shape or form. SandForce makes SSD controllers and has done very well for themselves because of their use of compression in storage. Suffice it to say that Sandforce has been the leader in performance for the most part since its the controller of the SSD that primarily results in its performance. PCIe SSDs do use the computers chipset but also have a bios and hardware of their own to enhance things, thus reducing the overall load on the CPU. In the case of OCZs new Revo, their Superscale controller does AMAZING things. At the enterprise levels, their new Z-Drive will push out 2.8GB/s read and write performance which is actually doubled if the customer orders the Z-Drive with two Superscale controllers. Imagine over 5GB/s read and write and over a million IOPS.

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As Les noted in the PCIe scenario the card does much of the heavy lifting, including RAID, as PCIe drives are often several individual SSDs connected on the board with hardware and software.

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As Les noted in the PCIe scenario the card does much of the heavy lifting, including RAID, as PCIe drives are often several individual SSDs connected on the board with hardware and software.

OK, thanks for all of the info. After reading a number of the reviews I have decided against the PCIe. The anadtech article makes it pretty clear that to avoid the possibility of random BSOD issues with SSDs an intel motherboard and intel SSD is the solution. That is how I am going to go. Cheers!

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I might suggest the Crucial m4 instead...the new firmware makes it a better performer than the SSD 510 and it's essentially the same drive otherwise.

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I might suggest the Crucial m4 instead...the new firmware makes it a better performer than the SSD 510 and it's essentially the same drive otherwise.

Really? Do you think that the quality and compatibility are the same? I am a big fan of intel not because of the brute performance but because I never have issues with their stuff and the anandtech article confirms my experience.

Also, there is a newegg deal on that crucial m4 ssd this weekend but it is the 64g version. Decisions...

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...there in lies the problem with all current consumer grade SSDs - quality and compatibility. ;)

As a Tom's hardware review of SSDs stated - this is IMMATURE technology and as a result people are suffering from bleeding edge tech that really isn't mature enough to be sold in many cases. The over-priced enterprise drives seem to be more reliable but unrealistically priced for mission critical apps. Many if not most enterprise SSDs use SLC instead of MLC - for the obvious reliability factor.

Edited by Beenthere

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Really? Do you think that the quality and compatibility are the same? I am a big fan of intel not because of the brute performance but because I never have issues with their stuff and the anandtech article confirms my experience.

Also, there is a newegg deal on that crucial m4 ssd this weekend but it is the 64g version. Decisions...

The Intel and Crucial drives are the same thing, the only difference is firmware, the Crucial's being more current. The Intel 520 however is on the horizon if you want to wait...they claim it will have much better performance.

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The Intel 520 however is on the horizon if you want to wait...they claim it will have much better performance.

I did not know about the Intel 520. Are we talking days/weeks or months/quarters?

I am considering canceling my order for the 510.

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I would have gone pci-e for sure if wasnt for two reasons:

1) price, no speedy solution is available in 120gb size

2) compatibility with lots of mainboards for booting from the pcie card. I had my share of headaches with raid controllers and I wanted some peace of mind that a simple sata3 DISK can offer.

pci-e and sata are converging for future storage solutions and new standards will be adopted within 2-3 years.

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There you go, I think you'll be happy.

I agree the M4 might make him happy.

I'm happy to see the title of the thread "Sadforce vs Intel vs ..." just because I've never been a Sandforce fanboy. But it's a small pleasure so don't flame me too hard for not being a Sandforce fan.

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