Kevin OBrien

Hitachi Releases Single-Platter Deskstar 7K1000.D and 5K1000.B 1TB Har

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Alongside the release of Hitachi's new 4TB 7,200RPM hard drive from their G-Technology line of storage products, Hitachi released two new 3.5-inch models with single-platter 1TB capacities. The 7K1000.D and 5K1000.B are offered in both 250, 320, 500, 750GB and 1TB capacities with fewer moving parts thanks to a new larger capacity platter design.

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More 1TB single platters is pretty awesome. 4TB in an external isn't bad either. Can't wait to get my hands on this new gear.

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Well, give it a bit. As typical though, we're going to see 4TB hard drives pop up in these externals before being available in bare drive format. Incidentally, I bugged Seagate again about the XT with 1TB platters to see what's up. They're outside their mid-year release date on that.

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Finally a benefit from 4K sectors. Seems Hitachi got the timing of the switch to "advanced format" just right. But what about IOPS? My two-platter 7K1000.C is a little bit slower than its three-platter 7K1000.B predecessor. Does the 7K1000.D suffer even more from its higher densitiy?

Also a two-platter 7K2000.B would be much more reasonable for the mainstream desktop market. And of course, with a top-notch 5 TB model Hitachi could get back the capacity crown. (The current 7K2000 has also five platters.).

IMHO a 7K5000 series with 1/2/3/4/5 TB models would be the most logical choice.

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I love the idea of a 5 platter 5TB Hitachi. We'll see, for now it appears the next step is going to be 4x1TB across the board.

As to performance, we're waiting on our review 7K1000.D but will post benchmarks as soon as we have one.

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Well, give it a bit. As typical though, we're going to see 4TB hard drives pop up in these externals before being available in bare drive format. Incidentally, I bugged Seagate again about the XT with 1TB platters to see what's up. They're outside their mid-year release date on that.

I'm probably not even going to buy the 4TB ones anyway - I normally triple my storage each time I upgrade, and that'd mean going to 24x3TB next. But, if nothing else it does mean cheaper and more efficient 3TB drives are on the way :) And in any case it won't be for another 6 months or so (hopefully)

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I just don't get it! WD bought Hitachi and the deal was supposed to be finalized by the end of Q3 2011! Why in the world are they still around releasing drives????! :blink:

That deal isn't supposed to close until the end of the year. After that, we'll probably still see both brands, at least for a while.

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Top speed on the 7200 rpm model is pretty sweet.

Just keep in mind that media transfer speed is not the actual data rate to the SATA bus. From memory I'd say the overhead is ~80% here (not sure what causes the difference) - which would still result in some very nice STR.

IMHO a 7K5000 series with 1/2/3/4/5 TB models would be the most logical choice.

Agreed. Accompanied by a 5K5000 series with 1/2/3/4/5 TB models :)

5K1000.B is pretty lame, though. You don't go for a *small* and slow HDD.

But what about IOPS? My two-platter 7K1000.C is a little bit slower than its three-platter 7K1000.B predecessor. Does the 7K1000.D suffer even more from its higher densitiy?

I'd be surprised if small file performance increased at all due to 2 reasons:

1. You can't beat SSDs here anyway, so what's the point of trying?

2. Higher densities make it increasingly harder to hit those small spots quickly.

MrS

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That deal isn't supposed to close until the end of the year. After that, we'll probably still see both brands, at least for a while.

The EU is probing the deal and will simply delay it. The Seagate/Samsung deal was filed earlier in Brussels and has the benefit of being looked at before WD/HGST. Anyway, before a deal is not through both companies cannot legally discuss any road-maps, technology, pricing, etc..

For a company targeted for acquisition, it is key to keep pushing new products and if possible even outshine the buyer. Once the deal is down, heads will roll and overhead departments will be cut. You better work in a department worth keeping.

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The EU is probing the deal and will simply delay it. The Seagate/Samsung deal was filed earlier in Brussels and has the benefit of being looked at before WD/HGST. Anyway, before a deal is not through both companies cannot legally discuss any road-maps, technology, pricing, etc..

For a company targeted for acquisition, it is key to keep pushing new products and if possible even outshine the buyer. Once the deal is down, heads will roll and overhead departments will be cut. You better work in a department worth keeping.

So when this probing will end? Any time line on that? Aren't they supposed to close the deal by a fixed date or default on it?

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MrSpadge' timestamp='1315485277' post='271298']I'd be surprised if small file performance increased at all due to 2 reasons:

1. You can't beat SSDs here anyway, so what's the point of trying?

You can beat SSDs in reliability, hassle-freeness and $/TB. ;-)

If you increase the data density, so you get 1000 instead of 500 GB into a one-platter drive, you should get better seek times on a 100 GB partition, because of the seeking distance halved. If that is the case, it's okay for me.

2. Higher densities make it increasingly harder to hit those small spots quickly.

I'm fine with the 90-100 IOPS, a good 7200 rpm drive can reach. I don't like drives, that are noisy like 7200 rpm and go as low as 60 IOPS like a 5400 rpm drive.

The newer green models from Hitachi and WD are even slower than my ten year old DTTA-351010 5400 rpm drive from IBM, when it comes to random access.

Edited by jtsn

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The newer green models from Hitachi and WD are even slower than my ten year old DTTA-351010 5400 rpm drive from IBM, when it comes to random access.

Did you check out SRs recent review of the Western Digital AV-GP 3TB? Personally I find its random access performance absolutely amazing (-> so they can do it with 5400 rpm, if they want to). Didn't yield much of a net real world performance increase (STR also increased, but the firmware in general seems quite different - this could cancel out gains by better random access).

MrS

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Seagate took over most of Samsung's storage assets.

that deal isn't through yet, either. At least Seagate filed with the EU 1 day earlier as WD did.

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