JimmyFal

Will OCZ SSD Vertex 3 make an old PC run great?

14 posts in this topic

I have a new pc that I built and am obviously stunned by the performance of the OCZ with the Sandy Bridge and P67 motherboard etc.

If I put one of these SSD's into say, and older XP laptop as a replacement for the SATA that is already in there, will I also be stunned over the improvement in booting and app startup times? Even though there is no 6gb/sec interface?

I am dying to try.

Thanks...

JF

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Stunned most likely, but also a waste of money. A prior generation drive will probably do just as well, at a much lower cost.

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I replaced an older 10k rpm scsi drive with an Intel 310 SSD drive. Both the server and the scsi drive were purchased in 2005.

- it boots MUCH faster

- its QUIET

Applications dont seem to run much faster, but anything accessing the SSD seems snappier.

Since I plan to keep this server for a number of years, the investment was worth it. For a laptop? it depends how valuable the speed is to you. On the other hand, if you get a SSD, you can move it to a new PC, or newer laptop when your old one dies.

Another thing to ponder to breathe new life in your old laptop is to upgrade the memory. its probably cheaper than a new SSD, but on the downside you probably cant migrate the new memory to a new pc/laptop when you upgrade.

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Stunned most likely, but also a waste of money. A prior generation drive will probably do just as well, at a much lower cost.

Well actually I did some side by side tests with a cloned 7200rpm drive and the differences were kind ridiculous for boot times and application launching, and video special effect rendering. So I guess criticism is one thing but my reality is quite something else.

JF

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Not sure I understand your reply, but I did say you would be stunned. Were you stunned in a good way? My point was that the V3 is overkill for your proposed use.

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Not sure I understand your reply, but I did say you would be stunned. Were you stunned in a good way? My point was that the V3 is overkill for your proposed use.

Yeah sorry, i mis read you. I thought you were ragging on me for using an SSD in the first place on the new machine. My bad. It just seems to me that on SO many old pc's, the bottleneck is so much the hard disk. I mean that's all you see cranking away, is the HD light. Most peopele don't really give a crap about how fast video renders, but they do care about boot times, and application launches.

I get it though, probably not worth.

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What notebook did you install the SSD in?

Yeah upgrading the HDD is great choice when dealing with older computers. A lot better then say a CPU upgrade which may only help rendering by a couple of seconds...

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Haha, good - sorry for the confusion. I love a good value SSD in old systems, makes a huge difference in boot and any load activity.

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I will use this thread to ask the same question about upgrading my really old PC with SSD.

I don’t want to buy a new PC yet, because I’m able to perform all the tasks I need with my old one. Anyway, I feel that for many tasks the bottleneck is my HDD. I’ve read other users experiences with SSDs on their old systems and I was impressed by the results, therefore I’m considering upgrading with SSD too. I’m thinking of buying SATA3 SSD that I would be able to use with my new machine, which I will buy in the future. However, I would like to use SATA3 SSD on my old machine like for a year or so before buying a new computer.

Here is the specifications of my current old PC:

CPU: P4 3.8 GHz (x64 capable)

RAM: 4 GB DDR1

GPU: 256 MB

MB: Intel D915PGN. SATA1. 2 x PCI Express x1 connectors. 1 x PCI Express x16 connector.

As far as I know, in order for a SSD to work properly (not to slow down and accumulate garbage) TRIM command (windows 7 and newer supports TRIM) and AHCI are needed. My motherboard doesn’t have AHCI. Would it be possible to add a controller that supports AHCI and SATA3 to my motherboard PCI-e slot? By reading Wikipedia about TRIM I’ve found this information:

Windows 7 only supports TRIM for ordinary (AHCI) drives and does not support this command for PCI-Express SSDs that are different type of device, even if the device itself would accept the command.
Does that mean that I will not be able to use a controller in order to upgrade my motherboard for using SSD?

To sum up, I would like to buy a SSD and use it on my current old PC for a year or more (it depends how well it will perform) before buying a completely new PC. Could you please tell me if it’s possible to upgrade my old PC with SATA3 SSD? What controller would be needed? What to do in order not to get my SSD slowed down?

I appreciate your input and help. Thank you.

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Are you sure that Crucial M4 doesn’t need TRIM to function correctly?

This is a short quotation from this article:

Without TRIM the m4 can degrade to a very, very low performance state.

Well I've heard that modern SSD can be used even without AHCI and TRIM support since modern SSD have garbage collection technologies. So in my case, I could simply connect an SSD to my motherboard’s SATA 1 port and use it. I know that the bottleneck here would be SATA 1 bandwidth of 150 MB/s , but I would still get zero seek time and definitive improvement in speed in general.

Anyway, another option would be using a PCI-e to SATA controller. PCI Express 1.0 offers maximum per-lane data rate of 250 MB/s, so I would get faster speeds and controllers support AHCI which would further improve SSD performance.

What about using PCI-e to SATA controller like this one or this one?

Both of these controllers Supports Native Command Queue (NCQ) which is a part of AHCI, therefore I assume that these controllers support AHCI too.

Will adding one of these controllers to my motherboard’s revision 1 PCI-Express x1 slot upgrade my system with AHCI mode despite the fact that motherboards chipset doesn’t support AHCI by itself?

Will it be possible to boot from an SSD connected to controller?

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If your SSD is limited to 150 MB/s.. you can't really call it "limited" compared to the current HDD you're using. If your files fly at 150 MB/s the system is going to be fast enough anyway. You may even already run into CPU limitations (depending on the workload, of course).

I wouldn't bother with these converter cards if you're likely upgrading in a year anyway.

MrS

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You say no 6gb/sec interface. I assume that what you have is Sata II then, correct?

Sata II itself should not be a lot of a bottleneck I think. Might have been far worse if it was the first gen Sata I. At least that's what several owners of Lenovo laptops go to experience when Lenovo deliberately cut the fully Sata II controller down to Sata I standards because them had some old obscure Docking-station which them wanted to be fully compatible at every bloody cost - Eventually it cost them some reputation among the owners of Thinkpads ;)

Anyway. One guy whose username is Middleton in another forum modified the bios for what I think was all of the affected Thinkpads to enable Sata II again among some other things.

At least one other guy which had the actual docking station used it to copy files between the hdd in it and the laptop, with the modified bios, and he reported that it worked well.

The thread: and modified bios-files on page 8 http://forum.notebookreview.com/lenovo/459591-t61-x61-sata-ii-1-5-gb-s-cap-willing-pay-solution.html

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Thank you all for your input and opinions.

I’ve decided not to use PCIe to SATA3 controller card and plug an SSD directly to my motherboard’s SATA1 connector without the support of AHCI, NCQ and TRIM.

I’ll be running windows XP, so probably an SSD with capacity around 60 GB would be enough.

Since there will be no AHCI support, I think, an SSD should have a good garbage collection system and ability to run TRIM command manually using included software like toolbox etc.

Do you know some SSD models that operate well on really old machines based on users experience?

What particular SSD model that would run well using SATA1 without AHCI support on windows XP would you recommend?

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