Brian

Intel SSD 510 Review Discussion

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Sounds fair enough. The only remaining question then is will there be a considerable price drop on the G2 in the forthcoming weeks now that the 510 is being released? Will there be a big drop when the 25nm ssd:s arrive? And how far away are these drives?

I love Shuttle xpcs, however at cebit right now there was nothing much new with their release except upgrade to usb3.0 and sata6gb/s. I was hoping for watercooling which has been in the whispers for these xpc's. So I just don't feel like upgrading since my xpc is less than 12 months old. I'll wait one more year til usb3.0 and sata6.0 becomes more standard and probly not as pricey.

So the only question holding me back from headin out to the local comp store tomorrow is if there will be a significant price drop on the G2 anytime soon?

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...The only remaining question then is will there be a considerable price drop on the G2 in the forthcoming weeks now that the 510 is being released?...

Newegg is showing a $75 rebate from Intel (March 1 and 2 only).

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Hey all,

Just wanted to ask is it me or are the prices high for this drive? Here in Toronto Canada at the local computer store, Canadacomputers, they list the 120GB drive at $299 and $609 for the 250GB models. Didn't Intel say the prices would be lower? I could get a Vertex 2 for $199. Same capacity and slightly lower performance.

Also I don't consider the constant sequential read and write speeds power consumption to be slight. Going from .26W at idle to 1.3W read and 3.2W write is high. The Sandforce is .5W at idle and go to .73W read and 1.1W write. Any thoughts on this?

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Storage Review should not measure read and write power consumption with IOMeter writing a repeatable pattern. That is not a realistic test, and it allows the Sandforce drives to write almost nothing to flash, since they use deduplication. With real data, the Sandforce drives would have to write a lot more to flash, and the power usage would be much higher.

Storage Review should run the AS-SSD benchmark, and measure the power during writing and reading of random data.

Thanks for the info. Wasn't aware of that. Also doesn't the 120GB perform worse than the 250GB? If that's the case then the 510 is a HUGE FAILURE.

Edited by madseven

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Also doesn't the 120GB perform worse than the 250GB? If that's the case then the 510 is a HUGE FAILURE.

Huh? Lower capacity SSDs always have lower performance, particularly with sequential write.

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I read a few other reviews of the 510 series, and it seems that under heavier write loads, the 510 pulls closer to or even ahead of the Vertex 3 whereas on lighter workloads, the Vertex 3 has clearly superior performance. This certainly gives credence to the idea that Intel tuned the 510 series for a particular kind of workload.

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I've seen it mentioned a few times in several places, that while the Intel SSDs (previous and current generation) may be behind in terms of average speed in general, they make up for in stability and compatibility. Have I summed that up accurately? And if so, in what ways are the Intels more stable and/or compatible?

Is it the consensus of reviewers and consumers that the Intels have less serious failure rates than say Crucial or OCZ SSDs, or just less issues and headaches in general? And about compatibility, what examples are there of PCs or chipsets that won't work with an OCZ or Crucial, but will work with an Intel?

Furthermore, now that Intel is using a Marvell controller, does that same legendary (if it can be called that) stability still apply, or should we give the 510 some time out in the real world before make that conclusion.

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From what I can tell, Intel spends more time and effort in compatibility and reliability testing than anyone else. Is this significant? Yeah, it can be...we've seen some early SSDs just be flat out incompatible with our test system, requiring a firmware update to make it work right. These metrics are softer and fluffier since they're impossible for us to measure, but something that we like to mention because sometimes these two things are more important than performance.

As to the SSD 510 and reliability...too soon to tell...but I'd *guess* they'll be solid.

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Intel SSDs went through at least 2-3 major firmware issues before they gained their reputation for reliability. It's always a good idea to wait a little while to see what happens with a new SSD model. If there are any major problems, they'll show up quickly. If there are no major problems, then the SSD should be good.

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One of the constants in the universe seems to be: making the right choice is rarely clear cut.

No matter what it is, whether it's a CPU, a toaster oven, a car, a TV, or an SSD....one manufacturer's version of a product has something the other doesn't have, and vice versa. Do I want Intel "reliability" or do I want Sandforce "badass hotness", meanwhile possibly sacrificing one PRO for a CON? Then again, I suppose standard hard disk drives have become so commonplace, that after deciding whether you want s 5400, 7200 or 10,000 RPM drive, the only thing left to consider is price, since most HDD's performance and reliability have plateaued and normalized.

I find it fascinating, from a relatively non-technical observers point of view, that a such a young, small company like Sandforce can engineer/innovate/design/create something so powerful it can go up against a behemoth company like Intel with comparatively endless resources at it's disposal, and give them a such a smack-down.

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Interestingly though, when you see the pair of 3TB reviews we're about to publish, in our real world tests, they're equal in one and pretty different in the other two. But yeah, there do start to be some upward limits on general performance capability. Damn physics.

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True. Still, Intel is bound to have some other SSDs up its sleeve and if the 510 is a stopgap while they develop their own next-gen controller, they may still come out on top by the end of the year. It's also important that the Intel 510 is selling now and the new Sandforce-based SSDs are still waiting.

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