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Brian

Silverstone HDDBoost Review

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Silverstone’s HDDBoost device pairs an SSD with a hard drive and claims to increase performance up to 70%. We take an in-depth look and find out if it delivers.

Full Review

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Silverstone's HDDBoost device pairs an SSD with a hard drive and claims to increase performance up to 70%. We take an in-depth look and find out if it delivers.

Full Review

think i'm missing something about this product.......how is it any different than buying an ssd, installing my OS and Apps on it and leaving the rest of my data on a mechanical drive?

i get that i need 2 sata ports in that example and this device only uses 1, but thats not the reason for it's existence i'm sure.

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think i'm missing something about this product.......how is it any different than buying an ssd, installing my OS and Apps on it and leaving the rest of my data on a mechanical drive?

i get that i need 2 sata ports in that example and this device only uses 1, but thats not the reason for it's existence i'm sure.

Functionally it's no different; this just makes it a bit more "seamless". Also note that HDDBoost can be added to your system without having to reformat; just plug the hard drive into it and it will start caching data to the SSD automatically.

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Functionally it's no different; this just makes it a bit more "seamless". Also note that HDDBoost can be added to your system without having to reformat; just plug the hard drive into it and it will start caching data to the SSD automatically.

ok thanks for clearing it up for me Charles - appreciated

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1. Does pulling the SSD or Hard drive out of the HDDBoost leave you with a bootable drive and/or allow you to recover data on a system with a different motherboard/SATA controller? As in are there any issues comparable to breaking a drive out of a soft RAID and hooking it up to another controller?

2. Does putting the SSD in HDDBoost handle beginning offsets well? I'd assume so since they get to hide stuff behind the scenes but if the answer to 1. is that the SSD is bootable then you could pull it out and test it to see if performance matches a standalone SSD that is properly setup.

3. Assuming 1. and 2. are favorable how about partitioning the HD? If there is more than one partition and the boot partition of the HDD matches the size of the SSD does it cram stuff from the 2nd partition on the SSD as long as there is free space to do so or does it only cache from the boot partition of the HD?

If 3. works in a user controllable fashion I'd be thinking about it as a way to RAID 1 between an effectively short stroked HD and a SSD while having extended partition(s) that aren't a member of that RAID.

The down side for most home users and RAID is dealing with how to recover when a drive fails, it sure be nice to know how this setup behaves the same or differently from OS level raid 1 and MB based (fakeRAID 1).

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1. Does pulling the SSD or Hard drive out of the HDDBoost leave you with a bootable drive and/or allow you to recover data on a system with a different motherboard/SATA controller? As in are there any issues comparable to breaking a drive out of a soft RAID and hooking it up to another controller?

2. Does putting the SSD in HDDBoost handle beginning offsets well? I'd assume so since they get to hide stuff behind the scenes but if the answer to 1. is that the SSD is bootable then you could pull it out and test it to see if performance matches a standalone SSD that is properly setup.

3. Assuming 1. and 2. are favorable how about partitioning the HD? If there is more than one partition and the boot partition of the HDD matches the size of the SSD does it cram stuff from the 2nd partition on the SSD as long as there is free space to do so or does it only cache from the boot partition of the HD?

If 3. works in a user controllable fashion I'd be thinking about it as a way to RAID 1 between an effectively short stroked HD and a SSD while having extended partition(s) that aren't a member of that RAID.

The down side for most home users and RAID is dealing with how to recover when a drive fails, it sure be nice to know how this setup behaves the same or differently from OS level raid 1 and MB based (fakeRAID 1).

1. The front-end data on the hard drive is merely mirrored on the SSD so yes, you should be able to recover data located on that part of the hard drive from it. Not something I would recommend depending on, though.

The other questions are probably something you will have to email Silverstone about; I don't have the answer.

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50$ for a device this stupid? I'm surprised. And I'm sure they need to keep the price up because they're not going to sell many. How difficult would it have been to create at least a cache of the most recently used data? Or use a simple microcontroller and keep a log of how often things are used, don't cache video files etc.?

This way I only see one single advantage of this versus a separate "small SSD, large HDD" setup: you can have only one drive letter if you want to. However, you get the drawback of not being able to directly control which stuff goes onto the SSD and which doesn't. Your entire windows will always be cached, no matter how seldomly you may use some of those files. But the new games which you installed after the first xx GB of your HDD had already been filled, and which you're playing all day and night long - this one is not going to be cached unless you uninstall older programs. Sorry, but very stupid!

Edit: just like in yesterdays news "Marvell Launches New 6Gb/s SATA Controllers" :P

MrS

Edited by [ETA]MrSpadge

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There really is no doubt that the Silverstone HDD Boost has a power level and performance in critical areas that simply do better than the hard disks drives.it operating system should be obvious to you, the reader, even the newest generation is slow solid state faster in most areas than the fastest hard drive.

translation companies

Edited by cherylfoster

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