Sign in to follow this  
Jnuw

PCIe eSATA Card Advice

Recommended Posts

Hello all. I'm looking for a PCIe card with 2 eSATA ports that supports hot swapping. This card will be used on a new Dell Power Edge R210 server, running Windows 2008 R2 x64. That's it, pretty simple, I hope...

Thanks for looking!

Jnuw

Edited by Jnuw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello all. I'm looking for a PCIe card with 2 eSATA ports that supports hot swapping. This card will be used on a new Dell Power Edge R210 server, running Windows 2008 R2 x64. That's it, pretty simple, I hope...

Thanks for looking!

Jnuw

The VERY VERY cheap and dirty solution : http://www.addonics.com/products/host_controller/ad2sa6gpx1.asp .

Not sure what you are wanting to do with it and if you would wish to use something like this in a business situation or not, but still.

But sure to read the limitations. This card has shared bandwith (not non-blocking) and also should be used on a PCI-E 2.0 port if you wish maximum performance.

Edited by Quindor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys for the reply.

In terms of what I'm doing, I'll have 2 eSATA external HDs (Rosewill RX358-S SLV enclosure with a WD 2TB WD20EARS HD) hooked up to this "backup server", copying a couple hundred GBs each night from 2 different networks using XXCopy or SyncBack.

I did look into those internal to external plate/cable/converters, but I'm not sure how good the internal hot swapping is on this Dell PE R210 server. The one eSATA port it has mounts the above listed external drive as a regular non-removable drive. However I can still eject it via the tray icon. However when I plug it back in, I have to "rescan for hardware" via the device manager. I was also reading that there are slight differences in internal to external SATA ports in terms of write status/queuing, and data corruption issues.

Thoughts?

Thank you very much!

Jnuw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never heard of anything like that with eSATA. Maybe if there's a dedicated controller for the eSATA port(s) it could behave differently from other devices on the system, but otherwise it's just another cable in the mix... The only problem I had when using a pair of eSATA enclosures to backup my stuff on Linux was that they'd bump the internal drives down two letters and confuse grub.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only concrete difference between eSATA and internal SATA is the shape of the plug. Everything else is up to the driver/firmware/operating system settings.

(Technically eSATA is also supposed to use a higher voltage for signalling to cope with longer cables, but this is both unnecessary and often not implemented)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this