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(Poll) Which Factor Ranks First When You Buy A New Ssd?

  

21 members have voted

  1. 1. Which factor is your biggest influence when SSD shopping?

    • Speed
    • Memory
      0
    • Reliability
    • Interface
      0
    • Security
      0
    • How easy it is to install
      0


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We all know that prices for a new SSD vary between products. So how do you choose your new drive? If you vote on the poll please add a comment here to explain why you made that choice. (I appreciate I have not allowed multiple choices so feel free to elaborate here if you find that an issue.)

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I think for most people at this point they either want speed/high performance or they want reliability.

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I went with reliability because in my book it is just that little bit ahead of speed if I have to choose between them. Of course both are possible if you are lucky. I've never had any issues with my Intel SSD. I know that if you look at stats they may have a fair percentage of DOAs but that is inevitable when they sell more than other brands.

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Guest Phil

For me speed is most important. Reliability comes second, but I don't think any of the faster drives have real reliability problems.

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Eh...depends. The C300 had a ton of problems with the first firmware, but that kind of thing is and was fixable. In terms of drive failure, yeah, that doesn't happen very often with SSDs. So really in terms of reliability, you're mostly down to compatibility, which at times is an issue. I know when Western Digital was doing the press talks around the SiliconEdge Blue SSD, they were promoting the compatibility message hard...I've never heard anyone lead with that. Then again, the performance of that drive wasn't very good, so they had to go with something. To their credit, I haven't heard any issues around compatibility though ;)

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I had to go with reliability as well. most of my time on the computer is working (programming, etc), so I don't need a ton of speed. There isn't a load of repeated loading time when starting up programs etc. however, any loss of data or system instability is a real problem.

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Reliability should be the most important factor.

The fastest and largest SSD in the world is useless if it can suddenly fail - and fails often.

(There are always unlucky ones - but some SSDs have had rather ehm - notorious problems)

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I wouldn't buy a drive if it had known, current reliability problems... but once they're fixed (as with the C300), I wouldn't hesitate if it was the fastest, assuming the cost was reasonable. The main thing I'll check when researching options is speed, with half an eye on value for money. I'll look for reliability issues after making my choice based on speed and value, and think again if there seems to be a significant problem with the product. I wouldn't pick Intel and assume it was reliable just because it was Intel. And as for the WD Blue, I wouldn't accept that much of a performance hit just because they claim I'll have less problems with it.

So, take SandForce, for example. Once they came along, then I wasn't really interested in the current Indilinx options any more, even though SandForce were brand new and relatively untested. I know Indilinx are still decent, and will consider them if working on a budget, but for a system of my own, I'd pick SandForce. I guess what I really like is elegance of design, real innovation. With their compression and resilience algorithms, SandForce delivers. Crucial have too, by being the first with a 6 Gbps interface, but you need the largest model and a controller to match before they beat SandForce. And I preferred the Athlon 64 to NetBurst P4s, not just because they were faster, but because the architecture was inherently better than Intel's. For the same reason, I prefer Intel's Westmere architecture to AMD's Magny Cours.

Addressing the other points, memory (by which I assume you mean capacity) boils down to value for money, but I'd happily pay a premium to get the fastest, especially given how much difference in speed there is between the fastest and the SSDs that are available for, say, 2/3 the cost per GB.

Interface... well, if you're sticking it in a PATA laptop, you've got no choice. But if you're talking about 6 Gbps vs. 3 Gbps SATA, then I'd pick speed (which was faster in benchmarks) over interface. I'm more interested in real world desktop numbers, which at present don't exceed 3 Gbps on even the fastest drives, at present. But there is an elegance to using the fastest interface, and if it offers a real world benefit then I'd go for it.

Security - I might consider it for a USB drive, but not an internal SSD. Anyway, that's what Truecrypt's for. I don't really need it built into the drive.

Ease of installation - I wouldn't buy a drive just because it came with a bracket or USB dock and imaging software. But I'd consider it if buying for someone else, as long as the drive was still fast.

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Speaking of SATA 6 - I'm close to needing a new notebook and may try to hold out for the interface to start showing up. I know the top end C300 is the only player in that space right now, but man, that drive really hums when in the right environment. I'm sure as soon as SATA 6 is more prevalent, other SSD guys will release drives with the updated interface. SandForce must be salivating at the thought of it.

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For me, it's definitely reliability. I'm way too paranoid about drives failing and losing anything. That's partially my fault though, because I never backed up anything in the past--lesson learned. Speed is second on the list.

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For me, it's definitely reliability. I'm way too paranoid about drives failing and losing anything. That's partially my fault though, because I never backed up anything in the past--lesson learned. Speed is second on the list.

I'm pretty much of the same mind. I have had two major disasters caused by not backing up material, shame on me that I had to lose out twice before I caught on. I think this point raises two definitions of reliability. Regardless of the tech aspects there is the human error factor as well.

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I'm with reliability on this one. The other aspects are not that important to me but having a reliable storage material is my number one priority. What good is the speed, memory, interface, and security if the data you save won't be properly stored.

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I'm bringing it closer to even by going for speed. I've been reading a lot and the main point (for me) of buying an SSD is the increased speed. Hard drives can fail too, so reliability is probably always a gamble.

Edited by Honest Joe

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I don't believe that...price? Are you running out and buying the crappy gen 1 drives right now?

Perhaps price/GB? That makes more sense...but even then, there still has to be at least some performance component.

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1st Speed: if I spend that much money it's got to be top notch

2nd price: I don't want to spend much, so whoever gives me such a drive on the 60 - 90 GB range gets my bet

However, I must confess I'm assuming I'm going to be lucky and won't have any reliability problems with that SSD, jsut as it has been with HDDs for me. I don't have any contradicting personal experience yet. So call me naive here - but once the 1st SSD fails on me early I may be more concerned about reliability.

MrS

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