Brian

Samsung Spinpoint F4 Launched

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At a promotional event in New York this week, Samsung has launched their latest desktop hard drive, the Spinpoint F4. The F4 features a single 320GB platter and thanks to the elimination of halogen compound and brominated flame retardant from the PCBA, the Spinpoint F4 meets all the environmental regulations including RoHS.

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Sounds like a completely uninteresting drive with lower density platters and less cache than some of its predecessors. The specs seem to be correct, however, as it's already available in Germany (link). And I fail to see any difference between the newcomer and this F1 model. They even got the same warrenty!

MrS

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They do claim a small performance and battery improvement (<10% each) when compared to the F1.

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MrSpadge' date='15 June 2010 - 11:34 AM' timestamp='1276626868' post='262263']

Sounds like a completely uninteresting drive with lower density platters and less cache than some of its predecessors. The specs seem to be correct, however, as it's already available in Germany (link). And I fail to see any difference between the newcomer and this F1 model. They even got the same warrenty!

MrS

Well we already know electronista is not always the most reliable source for accurate info, but retailers are notorious for posting inaccurate info for new products. That link to the F4 on the German site, click on the "info" tab and it takes you to spec's for the F3 series, lol...>5.4k drives etc, 8.9ms seek times.

Now compare to what electronista is claiming (with no source verification):

http://www.electronista.com/articles/10/06/14/samsung.spinpoint.f4.10pc.faster.but.also.greener/

Samsung intros fast Spinpoint F4 desktop drive

updated 03:50 pm EDT, Mon June 14, 2010

Samsung Spinpoint F4 10pc faster but also greener

Samsung today added a new, high-speed desktop drive to its Spinpoint mix. Although topping out at 320GB, the F4 is designed for speed with its entire storage in a single, half-platter design that drastically cuts back on the seek time. The disk is estimated to run about 10 percent faster than the earlier F3 yet still uses about seven percent less power.

It still spins at the 7,200RPM of typical desktop hard drives and attaches to an SATA or SATA II system, including Macs; Samsung sees it as a drive for Mac Pros and other workstations or servers that need speed but where an SSD would be too expensive. The disk will have either 8MB or 16MB of buffer space and should still be quiet in spite of the extra performance.

Unlike most of Samsung's drive line, the F4 is intended primarily for system builders and doesn't have a price. Most of the Korean company's drives are usually available in retail.

Seems to me they could have done the Cheetah trick and short stroke it, for even 'faster' performance :P > 'drastically' seems to be in the eye of the beholder.

Small performance gains versus much larger capacity drives, i would think most 'workstation or servers' owners, other than Xtreme budget minority, could afford an SSD- where needed in the 320GB capacity range.

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I look at the specs the different vendors listed for the drive and found they pretty much all agreed on the basics. Thanks for finding much better information, udaman!

Now I still wonder, is it using one side of a 640 GB platter? That would certainly give it high performance due to high STR, but would make t difficult to even reach the access times of its predecessors. Or is it using both sides of approximately one half (64%) of one 500 GB platter? Considering the capacity scaling with diameter this would mean using less than 64% (maybe 50%?) of the entire platter area. That would give still very nice STR and better access times due to short stroking.

Anyway, if it really is fast (we already know it's cheap) its 16 MB cache version would be a better HDD for office PCs than what's traditionally used there.

MrS

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I take it the seek improvement due to reduced head weight (1 head vs. 2) is insignificant in comparison to the seek improvement you get from short stroking with two heads?

I guess it should be possible to tell which option was used when the drive arrives for testing.

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