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SATA port multiplier recommendations?

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Does anyone have recommendations for/against specific SATA port multipliers?

Is one faster than the others?

Can they saturate the uplink, or do they suffer from the same slowness

as the sil3132 and jmb363 controllers?

So far I have found:

Sil 3726

JMB393

Marvel 88SM4140

Any others?

http://www.addonics.com/products/host_controller/tutorial_pm.asp

indicates that the JMB393 has more features than the Sil 3726,

although I think I can live without those features. I haven't found

any products using the Marvel chip.

I was hoping someone would have a port multiplier with a 600 MB/s uplink

by now?

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I would be more worried about which ones will work with your chosen SATA controller, to be honest. Firmware issues causing incompatibility are a huge issue.

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i have some.. i guess you could say.. in depth knowledge of such matters. knowledge gained from personal experience...

the Sil 3726 is soft port multiplication i believe. exactly what continuum said. it is dependent on the sata bus you plug it into.

the JMB393 however, is hardware based. its raid leval will apear transparent to the host.

what exactly are you wanting to do?

are you looking for raid? or just want to add more drives to your system?

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ok, so i did a little reading into this...

i think i need to clarify port multiplication for you.

these are my own words i will use to try and clarify this.

there are two "layers" to port multiplication. the first layer is how you bring the drives together (Sil 3726 or JMB393). the second layer is how they are presented to the host (Sil 3132).

i searched for the Sil 3726. most enclosures using that chipset came bundled with the Sil 3132 controller card. in specific, the Rosewill RSV-S5 and the Sans Digital TR4M. in those cases the drives would be brought together under the Sil 3726 chipset and presented to the host through a PCIx add in card based on the Sil 3132 port multiplier aware chipset. in cases such as this, the speed will be based off the quality of the controller. in specif, Sans Digital suggests the purchase of an upgraded controller card for better performance.

the enclosures utilizing the JMB393 chipset came with no such cards. if you wish to present all the drives attached to a controller featuring the JMB393 chipset individually to the OS you will need a port multiplier aware add in card or a port multiplier aware motherboard. i personally dont recommended the motherboard option as i have personally been the victim of incompatibility issues. at least on the AMD 790 chipset. however, no special host controller is needed if you wish to use the raid features of the JMB393. the JMB393 will present itself to the host as a single drive with the assigned raid level being transparent to the host.

so, in summery, at the risk of over simplifying it. the Sil 3726 is only as good as the host its plugged into. the JMB393 needs no special add in card when used in raid and demonstrated raid level performance consistent with that which you would find built into motherboards.

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continuum writes:

> Firmware issues causing incompatibility are a huge issue.

Any suggestions on how to avoid these problems?

pico1180 writes:

> are you looking for raid?

No.

> or just want to add more drives to your system?

Yes. System reads/writes multiple large files, so

need to keep disks independent to minimize seeking.

System: AMD64/nforce4-ultra, FreeBSD 8.0 FFS/softdeps,

couple of PCIe-x1 slots with Sil 3132 cards.

JMB363 cards are faster than 3132, but my Syba 363 cards are flaky,

could try another brand. Sil 3124 is said to be faster

than 3132 and provides 4 ports, but reviews on newegg say it

"Gets a bit hot" and "gets quite hot under load", despite that

big heatsink. Also leary of Syba in general.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductReview.aspx?Item=N82E16816124027

Today ran across this:

http://www.mail-archive.com/linux-ide%40vger.kernel.org/msg09961.html

which says 3124 + 4726 gives port resets, but 3132 works ok. Odd.

Looks like the 3726 can saturate the uplink:

http://www.mail-archive.com/linux-ide%40vger.kernel.org/msg09931.html

> incompatibility issues. at least on the AMD 790 chipset

I don't like hearing that, as I've been looking at AMD 890 chipset

boards. Any chance they fixed this in the 890?

Currently the leading contender is the Addonics AD5SARPM-E (Sil 3726) and

would be used with the Sil 3132 or maybe JMB363. (nforce4-ultra doesn't

support PMs as far as I can tell)

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ok, let me try to answer all your questions here... if i miss any let me know.

first off. i currently use an external enclosure based of the JMB393 chipset. i can get into specifics of its goods and bad if you would like. i also have an enclosure arriving today based off the Sil 3726 and a Sil 3132 card.

if you have a port multiplier aware SATA host adapter built into your motherboard you do not need a card. but there are issues with this. if you go with a card based off the 3132 or any other port multiplier aware card, then it doesnt matter what chipset you have.

"Currently the leading contender is the Addonics AD5SARPM-E (Sil 3726) and

would be used with the Sil 3132."

if you go that way, it doesnt make any difference what so ever what your motherboard chipset is. your only concern with the motherboard chipset would arise if you intend to plug the Addonics AD5SARPM-E directly into a SATA port on your motherboard. however, seeing that you want to use a Sil 3132 based card you will have no issues at all.

as for speed: the only time it really becomes an issue is if you intend to use your drives in some kind of raid level. the Sil 3132 is fairly competent at managing raid 0. its extreme speed deficiencies only arise when asked to handle raid 5. this is entirely do to the fact it only has "hardware" (and i use that term loosely) support for raid 0 and 1 and handles raid 5 through software. on top of that, reports are varied. some 3132's claim raid 0,1 support and others dont. but anyways, i digress.

because you will be using the drives independently you have nothing to worry about. the single drive performance will be far less then the controller's maximum. from what i have been able to read, the max for the 3132 is around 180MB/s on sustained's. that is far, far less then any 7200PM single platter drive could ever hope to achieve.

i hope that helps you at least a little. let me know if you have any other questions.

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> the Sil 3132 is fairly competent at managing raid 0. its extreme speed

> deficiencies only arise when asked to handle raid 5

The Sil 3132 also becomes a bottleneck when accessing both drives at once,

without RAID:

http://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-hardware/2010-May/006364.html

> because you will be using the drives independently you have nothing to

> worry about.

I will be using multiple drives at once, so my concern was that the PM

might have the same sort of bottleneck when using multiple drives at

once that the 3132 and 363 controllers have. (The siis(4) device driver

does claim to support FIS-based switching.)

The performance of the 393 PM isn't very impressive in this test:

http://www.semiaccurate.com/2009/12/31/lian-li-vs-photofast-pcie-x1-raid-controllers/

Is your 393 this slow, or did they get something wrong in the test?

>> incompatibility issues. at least on the AMD 790 chipset

I assume this is AMD 790 chipset + JMB 393 PM.

> i also have an enclosure arriving today based off the Sil 3726

I'd be interested in knowing if the AMD 790 chipset + Sil 3726 PM

play well together?

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The Sil 3132 also becomes a bottleneck when accessing both drives at once,

without RAID:

http://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-hardware/2010-May/006364.html

I will be using multiple drives at once, so my concern was that the PM

might have the same sort of bottleneck when using multiple drives at

once that the 3132 and 363 controllers have. (The siis(4) device driver

does claim to support FIS-based switching.)

throw some usage scenarios at me and i will see if i can replicate them. the simplest thing i could think of would be moving a large ISO from one drive on the port multiplier infrastructure to another on the port multiplier infrastructure.

The performance of the 393 PM isn't very impressive in this test:

http://www.semiaccurate.com/2009/12/31/lian-li-vs-photofast-pcie-x1-raid-controllers/

Is your 393 this slow, or did they get something wrong in the test?

to say the least that is an extremely unorthodox way to apply the 393. anyway. here are the results on my 393. note the abysmal 512k and 4k's. any slower and there wouldnt be any. however, for its implementation all i care about is sequentials as all it does is handle 5GB+ files.

the first is raid 5 on the 393 plugged into the on board SATA of an ATI 780G/SB700. the second is raid 0.

post-3147-12749443245043_thumb.jpg

post-3147-12749444706626_thumb.jpg

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The Sil 3132 also becomes a bottleneck when accessing both drives at once,

without RAID:

http://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-hardware/2010-May/006364.html

I will be using multiple drives at once, so my concern was that the PM

might have the same sort of bottleneck when using multiple drives at

once that the 3132 and 363 controllers have. (The siis(4) device driver

does claim to support FIS-based switching.)

ok... so i spent the better part of about 8 hours testing an external enclosure based off a Sil 3726.

i used two VRaptors striped with windows software raid 0.

the 3726 was always attached to the 3132

the sil3132 topped out at around 150MB/s reads and 147MB/s writes. that was with two drives plugged directly into it. see posted image for details.

when i plugged the drives in to the 3726 and plugged the 3726 into the 3132 the best i got was around 120MB/s reads and writes. see attached for that too.

i did some real world raw data copy tests using a 6.8GB ISO.

while copying the file from one hard drive to another, both attached to the 3726. the interior transfers were at about 75MB/s. i believe this was a hard drive bottleneck. i had to use single drive to single drive for this. if you would like i can revisit this with two SSD's if you would like.

while copying the 6.8GB ISO from an SSD attached to the motherboard host controller, and copying onto the VRaptors in raid 0 attached to the 3726 the transfer finished at 120MB/s.

while copying the ISO from the SSD attached to the motherboard host controller, to the VRaptors in raid 0 on the 3726, and simultaneously copying another 6.8GB ISO on different hard drive attached to the 3726 to a separate hard drive attached to the 3726 (4 hard drives total in use, two copying a 6.8GB file internally while a second 6.8GB file comes in from externally on two other hard drives). the internal transfer dropped to 30MB/s and the file coming in finished at 75MB/s.

i hope that data helps.

post-3147-12749751699749_thumb.png

post-3147-12749751842705_thumb.png

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I'd be interested in knowing if the AMD 790 chipset + Sil 3726 PM

play well together?

they kind of play well together... kinda... the raid bios on the AMD 790 based motherboard hangs during post while trying to detected the 3726 plugged into it.

if you plug the 3726 in after the bios post then you are fine. it works amazing. hot swapping is nearly instantaneous. and all drives are accessible as individual drives to the OS. but not being able to get post the raid post is a deal breaker for me. it hangs on the 3132 also though. but the 3132 times out and forgets trying to detect it during post. the motherboard host controller just spins its wheels on it.. there is no bios update for the 3726 so i dont know where to go with this issue... it even hangs if there are no drives attached to the 3726. so long as the 3726 is plugged into the motherboard it will hang regardless. i also tried changing the sata modes and that didnt work either.

the 393 was detected perfectly but for whatever reason the 790 host controller only wrote to the first disk at like 15MB/s sustained. all other drives were fine. just the first one. and it didn't matter what port it was on either. the first one in the line had 15MB/s writes and that was that. all other drives worked perfect. but at least the 393 got past post...

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> the raid bios on the AMD 790 based motherboard hangs during

> post while trying to detected the 3726 plugged into it.

I once read somewhere that PMs are supposed to come up in

a transparent mode, and pretend to be a piece of wire connected

the port0 drive. This is to avoid the sort of problem you are

seeing, if the controller firmware doesn't know about PMs. And

allow booting from the PM's drive 0.

Then the OS can issue some sort of "are you actually a PM?"

query and switch the PM into PM mode and see all the drives.

What I don't know is: 1) if this is supposed to be required by

some standard, or is just a nice idea; and 2) what is supposed

to switch the PM back into transparent mode when rebooting.

Especially if you just press the reset button. The firmware

would have to issue some sort of reset command to all the SATA

ports early in the boot sequence.

You might try:

1) power down mainboard and PM

2) power up PM

3) power up mainboard

and see whether it boots or hangs.

> there is no bios update for the 3726

Is there a bios update for the mainboard?

> the 393 was detected perfectly

It might have been in hardware raid mode, presenting one

big drive to the controller, rather than PM mode presenting

multiple drives?

> the first disk at like 15MB/s sustained. all other drives were fine

That sounds quite strange.

I recently discovered that there is a 4726 PM, which is more like

the 393 and doesn't require a PM ready controller. Perhaps it

would behave for you?

Can you turn the disk write cache on and off through the PM?

Can you access the "smart" data through the PM? Does NCQ work

through the PM? This type of stuff doesn't work with some of

the USB-to-SATA bridges.

> the simplest thing i could think of would be moving a large ISO

> from one drive on the port multiplier infrastructure to another

> on the port multiplier infrastructure.

Yep, copying big files (1-30 GB) from one disk to another.

Also, doing a large sustained fast read or write on one or more

drives shouldn't completely starve other drives being written at

a slower pace (say 2-4MB/sec).

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1) power down mainboard and PM

2) power up PM

3) power up mainboard

and see whether it boots or hangs.

Yes. I did all that. I believe it may be the manufactures specific, unique implementation of the 3726 that is causing this. The 3726 goes dormant after a reboot the second the computer conducts either a soft or hard power cycle. It only comes alive about half way through the OS loading. It behaves identically on two separate Windows 7 machines. Neither of them have any manufacturer specific software installed. I believe the host detects something there but doesn’t know what it is… kinda like, “hey, I know your there talk to me…” and the host doesn’t get a response. Some hosts appear to say, “ok fine, if you don’t want to talk to me, see if I care,” and the press on. But it seems other hosts say, “I know your there and I’m not leaving until you talk to me.”

Is there a bios update for the mainboard?

I am currently running the latest bios on my motherboard and cannot find a bios for the raid controller. I believe they are synonymous though.

It might have been in hardware raid mode, presenting one

big drive to the controller, rather than PM mode presenting

multiple drives?

It worked flawlessly either way. In hardware raid mode it detected it as single hard drive. In “open” mode it detected all the drives individually. However, ironically, it required a bios update in order to talk to it. Before the bios update it would do exactly what the 3726 is now doing...

I recently discovered that there is a 4726 PM, which is more like

the 393 and doesn't require a PM ready controller. Perhaps it

would behave for you?

That is extremely interesting to me! I am looking for a hardware PM that offers online capacity expansion. That would be wonderful if it did.

Can you turn the disk write cache on and off through the PM?

Can you access the "smart" data through the PM? Does NCQ work

through the PM? This type of stuff doesn't work with some of

Yes you can. On both the 393 and the 3726

Yep, copying big files (1-30 GB) from one disk to another.

Also, doing a large sustained fast read or write on one or more

drives shouldn't completely starve other drives being written at

a slower pace (say 2-4MB/sec).

From what I could conclude from the tests I did, the 3726 has room for about 120MB/s. At the sake of over simplifying it, that is the maximum total you will ever be able to do regardless of the scenario. Got 4 streams of data coming in on 4 different hard drives? Each transfer will be at about 30MB/s.

The good part is, you will only achieve, on a GOOD with FAST sata platter drives, 80MB/s sustained between two single platter drives. If you are going to be using “green” drives such as the Barracuda LP, or the WD Green, you will be more likely around 50 or 60MB/s.

At that rate, you could maintain two simultaneous data transfers and be limited more by your hard drives then by the controller.

On the tests I did, I conducted them on the fastest drives I have laying around. SSD, VRaptor, and Hitachi 1TB 7200RPM.

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> there is no bios update for the 3726 so i dont know where to go with

> this issue

http://www.siliconimage.com/support/searchresults.aspx?pid=26&cat=23

Looks like the latest firmware is from 2006.

Perhaps talk with tech support at whoever makes your 3726 enclosure,

and/or Silicon Image and/or whoever made your mainboard. And hope

they don't just point their fingers at each other.

>> I recently discovered that there is a 4726 PM, which is more like

>> the 393 and doesn't require a PM ready controller. Perhaps it would

>> behave for you?

>

> That is extremely interesting to me! I am looking for a hardware PM

> that offers online capacity expansion. That would be wonderful if it did.

You might want to poke around under http://www.siliconimage.com/products/

The SiI4726 is listed under "RAID Storage Processors" rather than

under "SATA Port Multipliers", which is probably why I didn't notice

it before.

One very nice thing about Silicon Image is that they publish

datasheets for their chips. Datasheet for SiI3726:

http://www.siliconimage.com/docs/SiI-DS-0121-C1.pdf

> From what I could conclude from the tests I did, the 3726 has room

> for about 120MB/s.

That sounds like the limit of the 3132 rather than the 3726?

Have you measured the 3726 with the 790 or other controller?

Reading from rust rotating at 7200 rpm:

130 MB/s (raw disk)

95 MB/s (real file from a real filesystem)

Reading from the disk's RAM buffer:

121 MB/s (SiI 3132)

164 MB/s (JMB 363)

253 MB/s (nforce4-ultra chipset)

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> From what I could conclude from the tests I did, the 3726 has room

> for about 120MB/s.

That sounds like the limit of the 3132 rather than the 3726?

Have you measured the 3726 with the 790 or other controller?

Testing just the 3132 I found the limit to be about 144MB/s. On drive setups that would get into the upper 240MB/s range, they were only able to achieve about 144MB/s on the 3132.

The 3726 tested identically on the AMD 790.

The hang issue has been resolved.. kind of… I cant resolve it on the 790, but disabling pass-through on the 3726 stopped the hangs on the 3132. However, it still hangs on the 790 regardless.

The raid management software tells the 3132 how to act with the 3726. I cant do anything to the 3726 or its drives in the 3132 bios. Furth more, I am actually warned against it by the manufacturers. The software that comes with the 3132/3726 requires a Silicon Image card to be installed. I looked for some raid management software for the 790/Gigabyte motherboard but I could not locate any.

As the 3726 functions flawlessly plugged into the 790 within the OS environment, I would suspect raid management software would be able to tell the onboard host adapter how to behave with the 3726 during boot. Maybe some kind of raid array would be able to be configured in the OS environment that would present itself in an amicable manner to the host during post? I don’t know. Do to my inability to find such software I am unable to put my theory to task. My guess would be raid software specific to the 3726, but at the same time indiscriminate to the host controller the 3726 is plugged into, would be the solution.

For now I would strongly recommend coupling a 3726 with an approved/recommended controller.

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>>> From what I could conclude from the tests I did, the 3726 has room

>>> for about 120MB/s.

>>

>> That sounds like the limit of the 3132 rather than the 3726?

>> Have you measured the 3726 with the 790 or other controller?

>

> Testing just the 3132 I found the limit to be about 144MB/s.

Yes but is that using 1 3132 port or both? I get about 120 MB/s

with 1 drive and about 155 MB/s total using 2 drives.

Since the PM is only using 1 of the 3132's ports the PM will be

limited to 120 MB/s by the 3132. This should be true for both

the 3726 and the 393.

> The 3726 tested identically on the AMD 790.

That's odd I would expect the 790 to outperform the 3132.

http://www.mail-archive.com/linux-ide%40vger.kernel.org/msg09931.html

Petr Vandrovec got 133.95 MB/s with sil3124 + sil3726 under Linux.

> disabling pass-through on the 3726 stopped the hangs on the 3132

It was hanging with the 3132? Oh dear. What exactly do you mean

by "disabling pass-through"?

I haven't studied the 3726 in enough detail but I suspect that

it is only a port multiplier and doesn't actually do any sort

of hardware raid. Hence the need for a PM-ready controller.

The raid stuff is probably all done in software.

You could test this by setting up a raid 1 mirror. A true hardware

raid PM would get twice the speed of a software raid PM. (The software

raid would have to send the same data twice, once for each disk, while

the hardware raid PM would duplicate the data, saving bandwidth on the

uplink.) So the 393 (or 4726) should get twice the speed of the 3726,

when used in raid 1 mode.

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Yes but is that using 1 3132 port or both? I get about 120 MB/s

with 1 drive and about 155 MB/s total using 2 drives.

Since the PM is only using 1 of the 3132's ports the PM will be

limited to 120 MB/s by the 3132. This should be true for both

the 3726 and the 393.

Yes. That is correct. That is what my tests showed.

> The 3726 tested identically on the AMD 790.

That's odd I would expect the 790 to outperform the 3132.

It does. The 790 runs circles around the 3132. Just not whith the 3726. When moving files from 2 VRaptor's in raid 0 on the 790 to the 3721 I did see significantly higher burst rates. But no matter what I did I couldnt get a 6.88GB file to finish faster than around 120MB/s. However, I bet smaller files would finish much, much faster on the 790 v. the 3132. But you said you would be coppying large files, not small ones. If you would like me to test different files sizes, let me know.

For reference, the same setup, when using JUST the 790, usually finish a 6.88GB file at about 215MB/s. 215MB/s sustained over 6.88GB's leans towards the 2 drive raid 0 VRaptor's being the limitting factor.

However, while conducting a simultaneous internal and external 6.88GB file copy, the numbers were spot on to those I got while using the 3132. EXT->INT=60MB/s and INT->INT=30MB/s at finish.

No matter what the scenario, or what the 3726 is plugged into, you can expect the max you will see for EXT->INT is around 120MB/s sustained sequentials(give or take 15MB/s).

It was hanging with the 3132? Oh dear. What exactly do you mean

by "disabling pass-through"?

This is where things started to get confusing.

What is Pass-Through (Actually spelt, "Pass-Thru" in the software raid program)? I have no idea. All I know is it allows the OS to see the drives independently. HOWEVER, this causes the 3132 to hang when the 3726 is plugged in. For example, if the hard drives were set to pass-thru and I plugged them into the 790 (after it was booted to the OS of course), I could use Disk Management to configure all the drives independently, copy whatever files I wanted to them, then move the enclosure to another similar system (windows based, PM aware hardware), accessing those files. However, if the 3726 is plugged into the system during a power cycle, it will hang.

BUT, if you use the software raid program to assign a raid mode, the 3132 will not hang during boot. If you want the OS to use the drives independently, you have to assign each drive to a Consintricute (SP?) raid mode. This setup will not carry over to the 790. The 790 will detect un-partitioned drives, and vice versa.

A vicious circle to say the least.

I haven't studied the 3726 in enough detail but I suspect that

it is only a port multiplier and doesn't actually do any sort

of hardware raid.

So the 393 (or 4726) should get twice the speed of the 3726,

when used in raid 1 mode.

I will test the 3726 under raid 1 tomorrow morning.

I never did any raid 1 tests on my 393, but raid 5 read and writes are at about 130MB/s with WD15EARS. 130MB/s is significantly faster than a single WD15EARS can achieve.

You have me thinking now… Monday I will backup my raid 5 393 and test it as thoroughly as I have the 3726.

Regardless, you said you would be using the drives independently with no raid level. Anywhere in the lower 120MB/s range, even with a +/- 20MB/s random deviation you are in numbers that reflect the limit of performance platter drives. Green drives would be slower than that.

The 3132 in conjunction with the 3726 in individual drive mode, properly implemented, would be an outstanding solution for any home user trying to manage their media library. If you wanted actual raid of any kinds, I would say, stay very, very far away from this thing.

I say properly implemented because I have no idea how an OS like windows home server would handle this thing. I dont have any idea what would happen to the performance numbers if WHS absorbs the drive into its storage allotment. I guess that will be my next test…

Edited by pico1180

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> I did see significantly higher burst rates.

> I bet smaller files would finish much, much faster on the 790 v. the 3132.

> But you said you would be coppying large files, not small ones.

Hmmmm... The controller and PM should not know or care about file size.

The OS, filesystem, layout of data on the disk (amount of seeking required)

may be affected by file size.

> leans towards the 2 drive raid 0 VRaptor's being the limitting factor

One way to take the disk's performance mostly out of the equation is

to read small amounts of data from the disk's RAM buffer. This

eliminates platter rpm and bit density, leaving only the disk's

electronics, and the controller/PM as bottlenecks. I'll attach a

small C program that does this. Tested only on FreeBSD and NetBSD.

(If you don't want to mess with it that's ok. I get the impression

that you enjoy testing this stuff so I thought you might be interested.)

Every time they increase the density of bits on the platters,

the sustained performance goes up, even at the same rpm. (Doesn't

help the seek time, though.) The current 2 TB drives are over

twice as fast as the 250 GB drives of a few years ago.

> No matter what the scenario, or what the 3726 is plugged into, you

> can expect the max you will see for EXT->INT is around 120MB/s

This might be, although it seems a bit odd that the 3726 would have

exactly the same total limit as the 3132 single port limit. Also,

Petr Vandrovec got 133.95 MB/s from the 3726.

> What is Pass-Through (Actually spelt, "Pass-Thru" in the software raid

> program)? I have no idea. All I know is it allows the OS to see the drives

> independently.

Sounds like Pass-Thru means pure port multiplier with no raid of any kind.

Which is the mode I want to use. But if it hangs in BIOS I can't use it.

> BUT, if you use the software raid program to assign a raid mode, the 3132

> will not hang during boot. If you want the OS to use the drives independently,

> you have to assign each drive to a *Consintricute* (SP?) raid mode. This

> setup will not carry over to the 790. The 790 will detect un-partitioned

> drives, and vice versa.

The software raid program must be storing the configuration as

"there is a raid attached to the 3132 port 0" rather than having some

sort of label stored on the disks that make up the raid.

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The attach file thingy didn't work.

[ code]

/*

* read_disk_cache_speed.c

*

* Read data from a disk's RAM cache buffer.

* Useful for testing controller speed without the limitation

* of how fast the disk can read data from the platters.

*

* Syntax: read_disk_cache_speed device readsize iterations

* FreeBSD:

* read_disk_cache_speed /dev/ad4 65536 10000

* NetBSD:

* read_disk_cache_speed /dev/rwd0c 65536 10000

*

* Original program was by:

* Manuel Bouyer <bouyer@antioche.eu.org>

* NetBSD: 26 ans d'experience feront toujours la difference

* Updated by:

* Dieter <dieterbsd@engineer.com>

* Added command line argument for buffer/read size.

* (originally hard coded at 64 KiB)

*

*/

#include <fcntl.h>

#include <unistd.h>

#include <sys/time.h>

#include <stdio.h>

#include <stdlib.h>

int

main(int argc, char **argv)

{

int fd; /* file descriptor */

int i; /* loop counter */

struct timeval tv0, tv1;

long t; /* elapsed time */

char *buffer;

long buffer_size;

if ( argc != 4 )

{

fprintf(stderr, "Syntax: %s device readsize iterations\n", argv[0]);

exit(1);

}

buffer_size = atoi(argv[2]);

buffer = malloc(buffer_size);

if ( buffer == NULL )

{

perror("malloc failed");

exit(1);

}

fd = open(argv[1], O_RDONLY, 0);

if (fd < 0)

{

perror("open failed");

exit(1);

}

if (gettimeofday(&tv0, NULL) < 0)

{

perror("gettimeofday");

exit(1);

}

for (i = 0; i < atoi(argv[3]); i++)

{

if (read(fd, (void *)buffer, buffer_size) != buffer_size)

{

perror("read");

exit(1);

}

if (lseek(fd, 0, SEEK_SET) < 0)

{

perror("seek");

exit(1);

}

}

if (gettimeofday(&tv1, NULL) < 0)

{

perror("gettimeofday");

exit(1);

}

t = (tv1.tv_sec - tv0.tv_sec) * 1000000;

t = t + tv1.tv_usec - tv0.tv_usec;

printf("%ld us, %f MB/s\n", t,

((double)buffer_size * (double)i / 1000000) / ((double)t / 1000000));

exit(0);

}

[/code]

It would be nice if the code tag actually preserved the formatting. Oh well.

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here are some screen shots of the benchmark results. just mouse over them to see what they are.

post-3147-12752781365113_thumb.png

post-3147-1275278142386_thumb.png

post-3147-12752781478602_thumb.png

post-3147-12752781596347_thumb.png

Edited by pico1180

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I am looking for an internal SATA port multiplier and have zero interest (sorry) in RAID (use Acronis). Obviously from the way I am framing this question, storage is not my thing. Briefly, my computer:

1) ASUS M4A79 Deluxe with AMD Quad-Core 3 GHz.

2) 8 GB RAM

3) 1K watt Ultra X3 PS

4) 10 1TB HD's

5) OS: Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit

Trust me. I read every one of the posts on this topic and my head is spinning as a result. All I need is more SATA ports inside my Case (CoolerMaster HAF 932). Although I always try to buy the biggest and the baddest, in this situation I am only looking for more SATA ports w/out degradation of Seek/Access speed.

Sorry for such an infantile question. I'm just hoping you guys can distill the two pages I just read into a bottom-line look-at-these-products conclusion. B)

Much appreciate,

IncurableGeek

Edited by incurablegeek

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