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Davin

Seagate Barracuda 36ES2

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Great review guys! Did I miss it or was there no pricing information included? Given the less than stellar performance of this drive, price will be one of the few reasons folks will give it any consideration when buying a drive.

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Davin, why are the pictures of the drive so large in size? 200KB for a 259*334 pixel image? Didn't you have problems with paying for bandwidth consumption? Surely a bit of compression would cut costs?

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I don't think anyone in their right mind would buy this drive. What a slug...

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From the article, I got the distinct impression that it was targetted to non-PC electronic equipment (the review mentioned photocopiers, but I suppose printers and process control hardware would also fall into that category).

In short, I don't think Seagate cares that it's a slug.

A statement that can be applied to just about everything Seagate makes outside the X15 at this point.

I do think it's sad that Seagate borrowed from SCSI to make the first Barracuda ATA, and has now stooped to borrowing from Barracuda ATA to make the SCSI version.

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I don't think anyone in their right mind would buy this drive.  What a slug...

If well priced, it might be interesting for someone who wants a cool running and quiet disk for storage and insists on SCSI for I don't know what reason. Otherwise, it's not very interesting indeed.

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There are a lot of users with pre-G3 Macs which mostly used narrow SCSI interfaces which will welcome a _new_ native 50-pin SCSI drive, especially with 18 or 36 GB or storage.

Most of these Macs can or have already been upgraded with G3 and G4 CPUs and some may not have a free PCI slot for an IDE/ATA card. This makes these drives an attractive choice (if they're not too expensive).

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Jeez! 8O

Why would one buy 7200RPM SCSI drives? If you have money for SCSI, buy something better. If not, stick to the lots cheaper (and quieter!) Barracuda ATA IV...

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I think it'd be nice if storagereview would start testing access noise. I realize that idle noise is very important, but if you're sitting at your desk and your harddrive is making a racket during accessing, whats the use if the idle noise is so low?

I seriously have been thinking of getting the Barracuda 36ES to upgrade the harddrives in the Dell Precision 610's at work, but instead, I ordered up some Cheetah 36ES's mainly cause of their low idle noise... Now I'm thinking of taking these Cheetahs and using them in a RAID server and using the Barracuda 36ES in their place.

Speed is important to me, but my computer isnt here for me to listen to. Its refreshing to see that there are indeed quiet SCSI harddrives out there, and like this one, even quieter than ATA :lol:

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This is good news!

I've been waiting for a quiet SCSI drive for my studio computer, and this is it for sure. I was amazed to find it is even quieter than the 'Cuda IV ATA. Soon I hope to have enough peace to get some recording done. :-)

Hardly anyone seems to mention these days one of the chief advantages of SCSI, that a drive can disconnect from the bus while seeking, allowing other drives to transfer data instead of sitting there waiting. Of course, in a single-user Windows system, you'd probably not notice. But a Linux multi-disk SMP workstation would enjoy this feature.

Bear in mind that this SR review is of the 36GB model, not the faster 18GB one with swifter access time. It would be interesting to see exactly what the difference is in performance, and why.

According to Seagate's official specs:

Seagate Barracuda 36ES2 18GB ST318438LW 7ms 41.4-36.8MB/s STR 1disc/2heads 2.0bels

Seagate Barracuda 36ES2 36GB ST336938LW 8.9ms 41.4-24.8MB/s STR 1disc/2heads 2.0bels

Confusingly, Seagate say that both the 18GB *and* the 36GB version have 1 disc read by 2 heads, not what the review claims (one head on a one-sided disc platter, and two heads, respectively). [???]

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For those who think PCs are the center of the universe...

This drive is not really meant for PCs. It is more meant for pre-G3 Macs, and non-computer equipment, of which there is a ton of, almost all of it uses SCSI drives.

Many times, for that market, heat and noise are the most important factors, not speed. A 5,400 RPM drive would often be enough for those markets.

What this drive costs actually isn't the first concern, that it exists at all for those who need it is.

Jason

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Now if only they'd fit a few more platters - I'd buy a 144Gb Barracuda 36ES2 tomorrow if they shipped it.

Reasonably, 4 platters would give that storage, and if I'm not mistaken the Cuda4ATA has 4 platters in the same enclosure.

Come on Seagate, give us some big SCSI storage - we don't care if it's slow!

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Now if only they'd fit a few more platters - I'd buy a 144Gb Barracuda 36ES2 tomorrow if they shipped it.

Reasonably, 4 platters would give that storage, and if I'm not mistaken the Cuda4ATA has 4 platters in the same enclosure.

Come on Seagate, give us some big SCSI storage - we don't care if it's slow!

That would be interesting indeed. Lots of space, cool running drive, silent... Hmmm.

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The Cuda IV has 2 platters, not 4.

Only Maxtor makes a 4 platter - 40GB per platter design, and 5,400 RPM at that.

WD & IBM both make a 40GB per platter - 3 platter drive.

Jason

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Come on Seagate, give us some big SCSI storage - we don't care if it's slow!

What you mean is, give us a high capacity SCSI drive at ATA prices. I suspect you know that Seagate has had a 181.6GB 7200rpm SCSI drive on the market for a while now.

Only $1300 street.

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:?: ATA drives with equivalent physical specifications outperform SCSI units in single-user situations. Why? SCSI's firmware is tuned more for multi-user use. In addition, SCSI's command set is vastly more complex and results in attrition through overhead

Example:

I use Nemesys Giga Studio which is a software midi music sampler for eg. high quality grand piano multiple samples. This tool reads every key and velocity of the piano as a large sample file from the hdd (a complete grand piano is approx. 2 GB)

All I care about regarding hdd is low seek time and high polyphony (many notes/sample files simultaneously)

What is faster:

4 ATA100 7200rpm ATA drives or

4 ultra160 7200rpm scsi-drives

AND

What is faster:

4 ATA100 7200rpm ATA drives or

4 ultra160 15000rpm scsi-drives

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I seriously have been thinking of getting the Barracuda 36ES to upgrade the harddrives in the Dell Precision 610's at work, but instead, I ordered up some Cheetah 36ES's mainly cause of their low idle noise... Now I'm thinking of taking these Cheetahs and using them in a RAID server and using the Barracuda 36ES in their place.

Funny you should say that. I have both Barracuda 36ES2's and a Cheetah 36ES in my machine, and all I can hear is a high pitched whine coming from the Cheetah which gets inside my head. The Barracuda's have near silent idle noise and very quiet seek noise, which is exactly what I am after. I suspect this is down to the difference between the FDB's in the Barracuda's and the conventional bearings in the Cheetah.

Of course if anyone knows of an alternative drive which features 10K+ RPM speed and comes in 36GB sizes without that high pitched whine let me know. I am struggling to find any 10K+ drives in that size that use Fluid Dynamic Bearings.

Cheers,

Jez

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