MJparker

Samsung Internal HDD fried

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I have fried my HDD- literally. I plugged my Samsung internal HDD into my new fancy computer and I could actually smell burning. I tried to restart the computer but as long as it was plugged in it wouldn't start up. I got a quote from a local University that repairs fried HDD but for $2000 I thought it might be worth trying to fix it myself.

Is this a lost cause?

:(

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Uh what? Hard drives can burn up, rather the motors and such, but 2 grand to fix it? Why bother for what's probably a $50 drive. Something isn't making sense here.

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Uh what? Hard drives can burn up, rather the motors and such, but 2 grand to fix it? Why bother for what's probably a $50 drive. Something isn't making sense here.

I don't care about the crappy old drive- it's the stuff thats on it! 4 years of photos and artwork- GONE. I have soem bits and pieces from discs etc. but I have lost a lot of stuff that I can't get back....

I'm trying to work out whether that my photos and artwork are worth $2000.

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Check the burned drive and see if it's the HDD's motherboard that's fried (some components on it may look burned). If that's the case, and it usually is, just try to find an identical drive (in some local second hand stores or maybe on eBay) and replace the motherboard. And you can get your data back for the price of that extra drive, which should be WAY less than 2K.

Edited by Katy

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Check the burned drive and see if it's the HDD's motherboard that's fried (some components on it may look burned). If that's the case, and it usually is, just try to find an identical drive (in some local second hand stores or maybe on eBay) and replace the motherboard. And you can get your data back for the price of that extra drive, which should be WAY less than 2K.

Thanks again, you're my problem solver today. :D

It's kinda an old drive as well, does it have to be exactly the same?

:)

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General rule of thumb with successful board swaps is that the more attributes you match, the better your chances of it working. Some HDD makers' products are more forgiving of mismatches. Ideally, match the model, firmware revision, and approx date of manufacture. If there's a part number on the board, try and match that, too.

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eBay can be your friend here. There's all sorts of old computer garbage on there, including drives that might be what you need for the board swap.

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A simple PCB (circuit board) swap may not work. Nowadays, drives have unique adaptive parameters (adaptives), determined during manufacture, stored in ROM on the PCB. This ROM information must somehow be transferred from the bad PCB to the new PCB or regenerated. At worst, using wrong adaptives on a drive could cause further damage and data loss.

On some drives the ROM is located in a small flash ROM/EEPROM/NVRAM chip, and someone with good soldering skills/equipment could swap the chip on the replacement board with the one from the bad board. But on the newer models the ROM is embedded in the MCU (the drive's processor).

But if your drive suffered a power surge due to a bad PSU, it might only have fried and shorted something called a TVS diode. It's possible your drive have two of these near the power connector, protecting the 5V and 12V input. Have a look at this thread on the Seagate forums for a solution on a shorted TVS diode on a Seagate drive. But I would not recommend just removing it as suggested instead of replacing it with a good one, since you could end up burning up the rest of the circuit board if there's still a problem.

However, the best advice is, as always, to seek professional help if you can't afford to loose your data.

Edited by Florz

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I'm not too keen on actually repairing the drive but as far as the data recovery fees go, how big is your HDD as $2000 does sound rather over excessive since from my understanding about $1000 is typically the maximum fee for drives that are 500GB or less. I'd definitely get some more quotes from other repair shops before taking that route if you decide to do so.

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If your files are worth $2000 then I suggest that you get those files even if you pay that price if they are really worth it. Then buy a new computer instead of getting an exact board because you don't want to have the same problem do you?

If you are knowledgeable about your board then do what the others have said to save money. But if I were you, I will just buy a new box for me not to have anymore problems.

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Thanks everyone! If I take it to the Data recovery place they're gonna charge me $400 just to open it up and confirm they can/can't fix it so.... I've decided to take my chances as a backyard computer engineer and do it my self. I'm looking at some on eBay right now so it should end up quite cheap if it is successful- otherwise a waste of $50 and my time.

I'll let you know how I go!

Wish me LUCK! :)

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