Sign in to follow this  
jdub87

Bad sector counts and smart data help needed

Recommended Posts

Years ago I actually knew how to handle most of this stuff, more recently though I've forgotten and am having trouble finding what I'm looking for online.

At work with our dell laptops we have a "keep the HD" policy. I've collected two now - a 60GB laptop HD that I have setup on the network as a community music drive of sorts. The second one just came to me yesterday that has left me with an 80gb one too. My plan is/was to mount additional HD's as folders as mentioned here: http://forums.storagereview.com/index.php?showtopic=28153&view=findpost&p=259055 - I've considered RAID 1 but.. eh I think I'll take my chances with JBOD and have the space. I may change to a RAID 1 setup in the future.

Of course I need to be reasonably sure that the HD's are only "manageabley" bad. Speedfan will display basic smart data and has a few "check drive" functions that just don't seem to complete. I'm also concerned with bad sectors, losing one song or two is ok but consistently losing more or the file system isnt gonna work out too well. I know checkdisc in windows at least used to facilitate marking bad sectors and moving what it could to good ones but I'm not sure it works so well with ntfs volumes?

What tools would you use in this situation? Speedfan is clearly not working out.

The way I see it I need a fairly convenient way to access smart data and bad sector counts to see if things are getting worse. That way when a drive is truly on its way out I can save whatever music I can off it and replace it with another bad one. Free tools are greatly appreciated.

Edited by jdub87

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
e. I'm also concerned with bad sectors, losing one song or two is ok but consistently losing more or the file system isnt gonna work out too well
Uh, typically a disk starting to show bad sectors is going to continue to develop bad sectors, and hence should be discarded immediately...

At 60GB or 80GB a disk, I can understand you're getting free disks, but it seems to make more sense to me to just wait for a sale and pick up a single, brand-new 1.5TB disk for $90 or $100 or something than having to deal with twenty 80GB disks?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Uh, typically a disk starting to show bad sectors is going to continue to develop bad sectors, and hence should be discarded immediately...

At 60GB or 80GB a disk, I can understand you're getting free disks, but it seems to make more sense to me to just wait for a sale and pick up a single, brand-new 1.5TB disk for $90 or $100 or something than having to deal with twenty 80GB disks?

No. We're not going with that plan. It's off the table.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't trust an HDD if it allows bad sectors to be visible by the OS. But I would be fine if it's handled internally and doesn't grow too much. I have two old WD drives (40 and 80GB) with something like a few tens of SMART flagged relocated sectors. It doesn't keep on collecting, and I've been using them for years afterwards.

Windows' tools should be fine on NTFS too. To view SMART info you can use HDTune, for example, though there are better tools specifically for this job. To run SMART tests you can use tools from the manufacturers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the drives are Seagate, you can use Seagate's SeaTools. It is available from their website. There are different levels of tests you can run. Everything from a quick SMART check to a full disk read/write test.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have salvaged a few hard drives by performing a low level format on them and then create a new file system. This doesn't work all of the time, but it has worked for me a few times in the past.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this