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kocoman

HDD that monitors the voltages like motherboard?

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I've never seen such a thing.

Since the HDD and the motherboard dervive +12v and +5v (and +3.3v) from the exact same source, it'd be kinda redundant anyway...? Unless there'e something specific I'm missing?

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So is there any 'reliability' reviews at this site that also mentions how the circuit board is protected?

For example, I can find reviews of 'good' ATX power supplies, ie: they would have pictures of the capacitors, and their amount, etc, to prevent surge, filtering etc.

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Not that I'm aware of. I don't think I've ever seen any review mention it. A harddisk normally is only taking +5v and +12v, and it's a relatively simple process to step those down to the voltages the individual chips need. Adding in filtering would generally be redundant, because harddisks can generally count on receiving clean power (or else the rest of the system would probably be showing faults long before the harddisk), not to mention that harddisks now are low-cost commodity items and even a $0.50 increase in parts... wouldnt' do much.

Also, the surges you seem to be concerned about sound much more like the IC's on the harddisk failing and causing additional damage, rather than a problem of faulty supply voltage to the harddisk.

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Since the HDD and the motherboard dervive +12v and +5v (and +3.3v) from the exact same source, it'd be kinda redundant anyway...? Unless there'e something specific I'm missing?

Usually, PSU delivers more than one +12V rail, 2 3 or 4 12V rails are very common :

-One is used for the CPU (dedicated 4pin for desktop or 8pin for servers)

-One is used for MB, PCIs, DIMMs, fans...

-One may be used for SLI and Molex/Sata

-One may be dedicated to some Molex/Sata

==> Most good PSU manufacturers have some online available explanations about this

Monitoring the PSU means monitoring all those "independent" rails...and I think this topic is right on this monitoring problem because, when using PSU with more than 2x 12V rails, I have no way to monitor 12V rails other than the MB and CPU ones

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Monitoring the PSU means monitoring all those "independent" rails...
Not really, most PSU's contain only a single +12v source-- maybe two-- and merely limit current on each "output".

http://www.silentpcreview.com/article28-page3.html

In the last couple of months, my PS engineering sources report, Intel has verbally informed them that the 240VA limit has been removed. A single 12V line is now "officially" approved, never mind what ATX12V v2.2 specifies.

Even on a 1kW PSU, it looks like some are only +12v...

http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=...y2&reid=173

ith more than 2x 12V rails, I have no way to monitor 12V rails other than the MB and CPU ones
In software that might be a bit tough, I agree... does the mCubed T-balancer handle it?

Hardware wise, buying an aftermarket voltmeter that affixes to the chassis shouldn't be as big a deal, but then you lose software reporting...

And again if one +12v goes south, usually the rest go nuts as well...

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Sometimes the SMOOTH chip burns out due to surge..

Do you want to figure out if SMOOTH chip is already burnt? If it is burnt, there is no point in trying to measure voltages. Even if it was, a surge is a surge, there is nothing you can do about it except using a sinwave UPS beforehand.

Besides, consensus is that the preamp is burnt before SMOOTH or along with it and most likely will burn the new PCB if a replacement is done. The only times I have seen these chips burnt are due to user error (connecting molex in reverse, unplugging hte drive while system is powered on, etc). Preamp runs on 5v, SMOOTH on 12v I think.

So as continuum mentioned, you have bigger problems than worrying about SMOOTH if it is due to power anomalies: GAME OVER.

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Well, I recall using some hot swap enclosures that provided fan, temperature, and voltage monitoring via an LCD panel.

Doing a quick google search turned up the following:

http://www.ioisata.com/products/Port-Multiplier/SPM394.htm - If you look in the description, it specifies that voltage is monitored in addition to temperature and fan activity

http://www.ironsystems.com/index.asp - Had a number of products which appear to support voltage and other monitoring as well. Also supported various alerting mechanisms too.

You could probably find other similar products that fit your budget and goal of being able to monitor voltage. I would imagine that most products that do this will also offer the ability to monitor temperature and fan activity, at a minimum.

Good luck with your search!

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Keep in mind most controller chips don't play well with random port multipliers. Compatibility lists for those products exist for a very real reason-- usually they don't work reliability!

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Keep in mind most controller chips don't play well with random port multipliers. Compatibility lists for those products exist for a very real reason-- usually they don't work reliability!

That would be why I also said that the OP could find "other similar products" as well, if the ones I happened to list didn't fit his budget or other requirements. ;)

I was just illustrating that a simple search that only took a few minutes turned up some items that looked like they might work, so a little time spent searching would undoubtedly turn up other products as well.

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