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New HDD burn-in routines?

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I must say thanks to 6_6_6 for taking his time to post all of this valuable information. I cannot help but laugh at anyone arguing AGAINST testing your drive for errors or the likely hood of future errors. That's like saying "well I've never been in an accident in 20yrs, so I don't buy that seat-belts are useful for me." While I wouldn't go to the same extent of testing as 6_6_6, I do put my drives through a pretty harsh testing to weed out any weaknesses.

I don't care what anyone says; TEST YOUR DRIVES THOROUGHLY BEFORE you put sensitive data on them. Nothing is worse than losing data AND all the time and hassle you went through collecting it, transferring it etc. As far as "burning-in," I think that what he's talking about is his methodology for it. He goes through a "burn-in" aka "testing" procedure. Once the drive passes with no errors it's considered "burnt-in," aka VERIFIED as "safe" to assume any further usage of the drive will work properly.

BTW- A HD isn't at all like an engine that is DESIGNED to be "broken-in," but it should be put through it's proper paces to at least confirm if the drive is performing AS ADVERTISED. Redlining an engine not designed to run consistently in the upper limits of it's performance window = stupidity. And running a HD in an environment which it's not designed to optimally function = stupidity. I'm sick and tired of hearing about how XYZ drive is the fastest this and that, then when you get it, test it, you find the drive isn't meeting the advertised specs etc.

Those that don't test their drives and just leave it up to "chance," are fools; by definition and proper application of "logic..."

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I totaly agree with 6_6_6 very good posts. and very good points v12v12

enjoyed all the posts here

Ive been testing drive's before there put into use since the late 80's mainly for studio setups hard disk rec.ect and yes ive had duffs from testing from new but ive also had duffs later on in use too.so its kind of pot luck.

Its still a very good thing to ...TEST YOUR DRIVES THOROUGHLY BEFORE USE ...so you can find any disk surface faults,spindle or weak pcb ic problems.

I mainly use the tools from the drive companys to zero write & do extending tests.I then fill the drive's to the max with txt,waves,mp3s,flacs,movie's iso,s ect ect so files are of all shapes and size's.

But for me the most important thing is this....my data is worth what its worth and to me its alot. i backup all my data on a 2nd drive (if i buy a 1tb drive for use i buy another 1tb drive to back up that one) which is then stored not used and in another location in case of problems with the 1st drive.(and no i dont work for any hard drive company gettin peeps to buy more hard drives).

This has worked for me on a few a dreed full occasions.

ta out.

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I totaly agree with 6_6_6 very good posts. and very good points v12v12

enjoyed all the posts here

Ive been testing drive's before there put into use since the late 80's mainly for studio setups hard disk rec.ect and yes ive had duffs from testing from new but ive also had duffs later on in use too.so its kind of pot luck.

Its still a very good thing to ...TEST YOUR DRIVES THOROUGHLY BEFORE USE ...so you can find any disk surface faults,spindle or weak pcb ic problems.

I mainly use the tools from the drive companys to zero write & do extending tests.I then fill the drive's to the max with txt,waves,mp3s,flacs,movie's iso,s ect ect so files are of all shapes and size's.

But for me the most important thing is this....my data is worth what its worth and to me its alot. i backup all my data on a 2nd drive (if i buy a 1tb drive for use i buy another 1tb drive to back up that one) which is then stored not used and in another location in case of problems with the 1st drive.(and no i dont work for any hard drive company gettin peeps to buy more hard drives).

This has worked for me on a few a dreed full occasions.

ta out.

Hard to disagree with this advice. Even though I am not a huge fan of HDTune when it comes to benchmarking hard drives, I do enjoy using the wipe feature to test every block/sector of the drive. During this I keep an eye on pending and reallocated sectors to see if they have increased, and keep an eye on other variables. I might be slightly more causious with an SSD, since they have a finite write cycle, so swap out write over entire disk with monitor SMART stats before and after clone or OS install.

Whenever I do install a brand new drive, I usually keep the old clone around for a month or so (maybe skip if you have the important data backed up to a RAID1/5 server) just in case something spazzes out on the new drive.

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Well heres one for you...

Testng a hard drive today for a client.

WD6401AALS 640GB WD BLACK

The unit is brand new and guess what? it come's up with this within wd lifeguard quick test

status code 07 failure checkpoint 97 and this is within 5 secs

As i type this its now doing an extended test but this has been going on now for well over 6 hours looks like its found a surface demon to play with :=0.

The estimate time is 19 hours.

Just go's to show how important it is to CHECK YOUR HARD DRIVE's

well thats it looks like this black demon is gettin returned...

thx

out

***Update*** Lifeguard on extended test not complete..Too many bad sectors detected.. will now test in another pc to make sure.

but this to me is looking like a rma...

Edited by outlabin

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