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Enterprise Velociraptors 150 and 300 gGIG

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What's the difference between these and standard velociraptors?

In the case of the 300GB 2.5", it's true 2.5" form factor without the 3.5" conversion heat sink assembly.

Removal of the heatsink on the retail drive version voids the warranty.

A true 2.5" drive allows use in things like a nifty 4-drive-in-single-5.25"HH-bay hot-swap unit.

e.g. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16816101189

KC

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Hopefully this also means someone will come out with an asymmetric 3.5" adapter that will allow the drive to work in 3.5" hot-swap bays. There are plenty of computers with built-in 3.5" hot-swap bays that cannot be changed or removed, such as the HP Blackbird, Apple Mac Pro, etc. Currently those machines cannot use Velociraptors.

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Hopefully this also means someone will come out with an asymmetric 3.5" adapter that will allow the drive to work in 3.5" hot-swap bays. There are plenty of computers with built-in 3.5" hot-swap bays that cannot be changed or removed, such as the HP Blackbird, Apple Mac Pro, etc. Currently those machines cannot use Velociraptors.

Actually in the Mac Pro it can supposedly be added to the second bay by unscrewing the SATA data/power connector and fidgeting with the cables a bit: http://discussions.apple.com/messageview.j...2&stqc=true

Or it can be added to the optical bay. Also I think it's impossible to make such an asymmetric 3.5" adapter, due to screw holes being in the wrong location. For more info on all of this, see my post at Ars Technica.

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I think it's possible to design such an asymmetric adapter, but it may not be something in huge demand in retail. For businesses, though, such an adapter would allow for replacement of older Raptor drives in low end filers and the like, without having to change existing infrastructure.

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I think it's possible to design such an asymmetric adapter[...]

Maybe with some tradeoffs. As I see it, there are two problems:

- Attaching the adapter to the drive: as the adapter must be attached on top of the drive, screws can't be used. Maybe glue instead, or a slide-in adapter with very thin bottom plate?

- Locations of the top two screw holes of a 2.5" drive don't match those of a 3.5" drive when the position of the 2.5" drive relative to the adapter is such that its SATA connector is in the expected location. If the bottom left screw hole of the 2.5" drive matches the location of the 3.5" (I'm not sure that they do), the resulting adapter with 2.5" drive attached of it could be fastened with 3 screws. Not exactly ideal, but might be sufficient. If the bottom left hole doesn't match I'd say it's not feasible.

Pic of 2.5" SSD and 3.5" HDD

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Another way is to not use the drive connectors at all for the actual hot swap contact. Instead, move the drive in the adapter so you can fit an extender behind it. Leave the drive in the middle, but shifted further from the backplane by a few cm. Mount a flexible extender to the adapter, bolted on the backplane side and then connected to the drive.

Of course, I haven't really seen SAS extenders. I have seen SATA ones, though. I've used it to allow use of internal SATA ports as "external" ones for drive testing.

IIRC, the 2.5" and 3.5" form factors do not have mounting holes in the same place. Moreover, the threads are different, using M3 vs 6-32UNC.

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Good point, that should work. While I'd not be too thrilled to have another cable and connector in between the drive and controller, I guess it wouldn't really be a problem and this would make things a lot easier.

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Well I don't know what is going on but yesterday I saw different photos of the new VelociRaptors on the Overclockers website (the photos up there now are of the GLFS).

As we know a 74 and 150 GB version are on the way both as 2.5 and 3.5" drives (the 3.5"in the cooling frame).

What was different yesterday were the photos, which showed the cooling frame to be different and new. I then went to the WDC website and found a PDF showing these new drives

WD3000BLFS

WD3000HLFS

WD1500BLFS

WD1500HLFS

WD740BLFS

WD740HLFS

The HLFS are significant in that the 'H' appears to signify the new cooling frame (BLFS is the 2.5" version without the cooling frame), compared to the original WD3000GLFS. The new frame layout implies that the SATA and power connectors have been moved to the normal position for SATA drives, meaning they will be compatible with all 'normal' SATA caddies.

I can't find the PDF on the WDC website now, but I have it locally and can send it via email to anyone interested

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What's the difference between these and standard velociraptors?

In the case of the 300GB 2.5", it's true 2.5" form factor without the 3.5" conversion heat sink assembly.

Removal of the heatsink on the retail drive version voids the warranty.

A true 2.5" drive allows use in things like a nifty 4-drive-in-single-5.25"HH-bay hot-swap unit.

e.g. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16816101189

KC

That thing looked really cool at first, but then I wondered...

...Do you really epxect to put 4 velociraptors in that without them dying from the heat?

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What height 2.5" form factor does that enclosure support? There are three different heights (I think): 9.5 mm, 12.5 mm, and whatever enterprise drives use.

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> ...Do you really epxect to put 4 velociraptors in that without them dying from the heat?

velociraptor is one of the coolest hard drives out there, and that chassis has active cooling

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velociraptor is one of the coolest hard drives out there, and that chassis has active cooling

Now if only they weren't made by WD, and they had an NCQ implementation as good as Seagate's 7200.11s, I'd buy four of them, put them in that thing, and blaze away at raid 0.

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Now if only they weren't made by WD, and they had an NCQ implementation as good as Seagate's 7200.11s, I'd buy four of them, put them in that thing, and blaze away at raid 0.

Assuming the advantages of NCQ show mostly in Multi-User benchmarks I'd say WD does quite a good job. Compare Multi-User Suite results for the WD VelociRaptor, WD Caviar Black vs. Seagate Barracuda ES.2 (enterprise equivalent of 7200.11).

The NCQ performance issues discussed in others threads sound like a Windows issue to me.

Edited by boli

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these 4* 2,5" enclosures have 40mm fans! not really what i want in my desktop computer...

I'm not sure about the NCQ. For database purpose, the Veloci should be the choice. But some databases allow parallel/multithreaded DML and queries . I guess here

NCQ would help optimizing access because of the longer queues.

I'm really not sure if a Veloci or a 7200.11 would be better . I guess the Veloci with NCQ disabled due to faster access times and higher IOPS.

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