loeakaodas

WD7500AAKS vs. HD753LJ vs. ST3750330AS

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I'm in the process of deciding which of the following drives would be the better option for me. The primary use of the drive would be storage of large video files (2~10 GB x264 mkv's) and subbed anime. It would be placed in an external enclosure with eSATA, either the AMS Venus DS3 or the Rosewill RX-358-S; they both have fans, but I would prefer to have a cooler drive so it would last longer. I don't want a 500GB drive and the price premium on 1TB drives is too much for my needs. Which drive from the above (WD7500AAKS, HD753LJ, ST3750330AS) or any others would you guys recommend as the best price/performance option for my needs.

Edited by loeakaodas

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Esata limits the speed so any drive will give about the same performance. They are all good drives so there is little point in agonizing over the choice. Some would say the Seagate for the warranty, but I would get the WD as I have 3 of them (smaller capacity) in portable housings for the last 2 years without a failure. One of them goes to work with me everyday in a canvas carryall.

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I hate to resurrect this thread, but am looking for a similar answer (using SATA 3Gbps). Which of the 750GB hard drives is best: Hitachi 7K1000, Seagate 7200.11, Western Digital SE16, and the Samsung F1?

~Ibrahim~

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The definition of "best" really depends on the person. To illustrate from some of the drives you mentioned - the Hitachi has great single-user I/O performance, making it a great drive for OS/apps/games, the Seagate has 5 years warranty, the Samsung F1 probably has the fastest sequential reads and writes though I'm not 100% on this one (the 1TB is definitely the fastest but the 750s are slower). The Western D doesn't carry much appeal to me personally, but if you got the WD Green Power and not the SE16, you'd have the quietest, coolest and least power hungry drive of the bunch, perks which may be quite beneficial in an enclosure. Although the Samsungs are quite close in noise/heat/power, their reliability is a little bit iffy as we speak:

http://forums.storagereview.net/index.php?showtopic=26454

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The definition of "best" really depends on the person. To illustrate from some of the drives you mentioned - the Hitachi has great single-user I/O performance, making it a great drive for OS/apps/games, the Seagate has 5 years warranty, the Samsung F1 probably has the fastest sequential reads and writes though I'm not 100% on this one (the 1TB is definitely the fastest but the 750s are slower). The Western D doesn't carry much appeal to me personally, but if you got the WD Green Power and not the SE16, you'd have the quietest, coolest and least power hungry drive of the bunch, perks which may be quite beneficial in an enclosure. Although the Samsungs are quite close in noise/heat/power, their reliability is a little bit iffy as we speak:

http://forums.storagereview.net/index.php?showtopic=26454

Yes, best is probably not the best word to use. I'm looking for faster boots, snappier responses, and quicker loading times. In a way, I want the advantages of a Raptor (maybe not to that extent, however) without the price of a Raptor, if that makes any sense.

Warranty, bluntly, doesn't matter *that* much to me. As long as it is a good amount of time (3 is more than enough), I am fine. How much emphasis can one, truly, apply to "fastest sequential reads and writes"? What does that exactly mean? In what situations would that benefit me?

This hard drive will primarily be used for large video files (300-500GB), some music (1-2GB), and many games (100GB+). The games need the response time and I will not be manipulating the video files, ONLY viewing them.

1TB drives, unfortunately, are out of my price range. And how important is 32MB cache in terms of my usage needs? Of course, it sounds good, but so does 4GB of RAM in which the advantages are dubious.

The reason the AAKS looked appealing was the price, but looking at other retailers, the 7K1000 can be found for only $160, a few bucks more than the WD.

Thank you for the reply! :)

~Ibrahim~

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Most recent reviews I've read ended up saying that more cache offers a very minimal increase in performance, if they even bother mentioning it at all.

I would probably eliminate these options for you:

Samsung F1 - somewhat questionable reliability

Seagate .11 - no particular perks except 5 year warranty, which doesn't mean much for you

That leaves the WD AAKS - quick drive but nearing it's end, although pretty cheap and the Hitachi - fast, but runs a bit louder and hotter. From these two I would probably pick the WD because it's cooler and quieter but that's my personal preference, generally for performance the Hitachi wins. Alternatively you could wait a little while for these new WDs with 320GB platters to hit the shelves and get a 640GB model - I would wager good money that it will be better than the Hitachi.

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Esata limits the speed so any drive will give about the same performance.

Why should eSATA limit the speed of a drive?

It doesn't limit the speed. Check wikipedia.

I know. I was asking photoz why he thought it would.

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Really? 320GB platters? That is gianormous! Fewer platters = "quicker" drive?

Yeah, I am under no particular time constraints. My current 320GB still has about 50GB left. :) How soon, though, can I be expecting these new drives? And being 640GB instead of 750GB, might they be slightly cheaper?

The WD 750GB is getting a wee bit long in the tooth; I was thinking about the GP edition, but I heard that it sometimes only spins at 5.4K?!

~Ibrahim~

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Really? 320GB platters? That is gianormous! Fewer platters = "quicker" drive?

Larger platters = higher throughput, so [usually] better performance.

The current Western Digital WD7500AAKS uses 250Gb platters.

Edited by Ken_F

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Really? 320GB platters? That is gianormous! Fewer platters = "quicker" drive?

Larger platters = higher throughput, so [usually] better performance.

The current Western Digital WD7500AAKS uses 250Gb platters.

For the record the Samsung F1 series already has 334GB platters - but not all models. The 1TB does, and there's supposed to be a 640GB and presumably 320GB on the way too. The 750GB does not for example.

As for your comment of hearing that the WD GP series "sometimes" only spins at 5400rpm, that's not exactly correct. It always spins at 5400rpm.

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Really? 320GB platters? That is gianormous! Fewer platters = "quicker" drive?

Larger platters = higher throughput, so [usually] better performance.

The current Western Digital WD7500AAKS uses 250Gb platters.

For the record the Samsung F1 series already has 334GB platters - but not all models. The 1TB does, and there's supposed to be a 640GB and presumably 320GB on the way too. The 750GB does not for example.

As for your comment of hearing that the WD GP series "sometimes" only spins at 5400rpm, that's not exactly correct. It always spins at 5400rpm.

OK, I will wait a bit longer, maybe mid-Feb to March before I purchase, then.

Really, always?!? That is ridiculous! That is now permanently off my list.

~Ibrahim~

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The current Western Digital WD7500AAKS uses 250Gb platters.

thats not right

the wd75000aaks uses 4 platter with <200gb/platter

the wd gp series use 250gb platters

but wd announced hdd with 320gb/platter

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The current Western Digital WD7500AAKS uses 250Gb platters.

thats not right

the wd75000aaks uses 4 platter with <200gb/platter

the wd gp series use 250gb platters

You're right, my mistake.

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