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chefwong

Those Raptors sure are hot lil buggers

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Finally got around to putting things together.

4 Raptors WD150 is a MiniG Sata 4 Drive case. The chassis is all aliuminium......and the hard drives are bolted on to the *frame* with a small fan inside.

Looks like I'm gonna have to do a 'lil modding as the chassis itself which is acting like a heatsink feels warm to the touch...

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My Raptors run as cool as any drive, but... there are kits that don't support them, and you do need some decent ventilation usually.

I've seen Maxtor MaxLine Pro and Seagate drives run hotter.

I'd rather see you using something more study with larger fans and power, like Sonnet's Fusion 400 or 500P. Or SeriTek if you plan on using them as I think you intend, for editing and scratch, and probably stripped RAID.

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Mine have run pretty warm when they're isolated with rubber screws, and/or not meant for "performance" cooling. For example some OEM Lenovo Desktops where there is NO cooling whatsoever except for the maybe passive exhaust fans... wayyyy tooo hot. I keep a 120mm fan on them if possible... Is there a cheap easy SMART testing program? Or is it built in to windows manager anyhow?

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Google's recent study about hard drive failure rates has received a fair amount of attention, but the folks at StorageMojo have found another study that also shows some very interesting results.

The study, which was conducted at Carnegie Mellon University and is available here, covers a sample size similar to that of the Google studyÑaround 100,000 drives.

While Google looked only at desktop hard drives, Carnegie Mellon covers failure rates for both desktop Serial ATA hard drives and workstation/server-class SCSI/FC hard drives.

Regarding the relationship between the two, the study says, "Interestingly, we observe little difference in replacement rates between SCSI, FC and SATA drives, potentially an indication that disk-independent factors, such as operating conditions, affect replacement rates more than component specific factors."

The study also says failure rates increase in a fairly linear fashion with drive age, suggesting drives simply "wear out" over time.

I read about SMART studies done by Google here:

http://forums.storagereview.net/index.php?showtopic=24659

http://techreport.com/onearticle.x/11890

http://techreport.com/onearticle.x/11872

http://storagemojo.com/?p=383

http://www.usenix.org/events/fast07/tech/s...html/index.html

http://www.techworld.com/storage/features/...samecatsamechan

http://labs.google.com/papers/disk_failures.pdf

But running on passive cooling....? ouch! :-(

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potentially an indication that disk-independent factors, such as operating conditions, affect replacement rates more than component specific factors.
That surprises precisely no one....................... although the differences in operating conditions are likely to be far different in many cases between "acceptable" and "not acceptable" for a drive, rather than the smaller difference between that between an enterprise-class drive and a nearline or consumer-grade drive.

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