HybridVision

the holy grail: quiet And fast

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Hi :) I'm currently using a Samsung SpinPoint 160g drive (SP80). This was bought purely for accoustics.

I'm pretty sure it's 5400rpm and I'm also sure I could get better performance from a newer drive. I'm interested in any drive that will reduce loading times in games, particularly online games with large amounts of paging being done.

I don't need a lot of capacity, but I do understand that larger drives are often faster. I'd say my budget allows me to extend to 400g at a push. There is a steep increase in price between 400g and 500g in the UK from what I've seen.

According to SR's performance database, the WD4000KD has fantastic accoustics and performance on par with a 74g raptor. However I'm reliably informed that SR's database is out-of-date (dont' shoot the messenger!).

So what would you suggest? Peformance is my #1 concern, but noise is also a factor (I don't want a HooverDrive ). Cheers in advance!

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Hi :) I'm currently using a Samsung SpinPoint 160g drive (SP80). This was bought purely for accoustics.

I'm pretty sure it's 5400rpm and I'm also sure I could get better performance from a newer drive. I'm interested in any drive that will reduce loading times in games, particularly online games with large amounts of paging being done.

I don't need a lot of capacity, but I do understand that larger drives are often faster. I'd say my budget allows me to extend to 400g at a push. There is a steep increase in price between 400g and 500g in the UK from what I've seen.

According to SR's performance database, the WD4000KD has fantastic accoustics and performance on par with a 74g raptor. However I'm reliably informed that SR's database is out-of-date (dont' shoot the messenger!).

So what would you suggest? Peformance is my #1 concern, but noise is also a factor (I don't want a HooverDrive ). Cheers in advance!

I am pretty sure your drive is 7.2k rpm, as imho all 5.4k samsungs were "v" series.

And i am pretty sure that you wont notice much difference in speed no matter what HD you will buy.

And if your games are paging, buy more RAM.

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A 5400rpm drive? Any modern 7200rpm unit should be a substantial performance improvement for you. Very few drives today are straight up loud, so I would buy without worrying about noise.

If you are concerned about noise more than performance I believe the latest Samsungs are pretty good, but the difference isn't huge between them and their closest competition.

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Ok, according to Windows the model number is SP1614C, and that shows up as 7200rpm on Samsung's site. Technology 1: Me 0.

So are we saying that there is little difference between the 7200rpm drives, and even my SP80 (sata 1.0 interface) is still good enough for games? No benefit to moving to sata 1.5 or 3.0 (with single or two drives).

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Guest 888
I'm going with either the WD or the Samsung:

http://www.silentpcreview.com/article29-page2.html

Yes, WD and Samsung are the current leaders in silence and at the same time their latest drive generations (WDxxxxAAxx and T166) are offering very strong performance, too. The performance of their 320/400/500GB models is really much better than of your older Samsung. At least in benchmarking you can see almost up to double speed(effect) in some benchmarks. But of course for average user scenarions the advantage isn't so big, in many applications you hardly will notice it.

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I'm going with either the WD or the Samsung:

http://www.silentpcreview.com/article29-page2.html

Yes, WD and Samsung are the current leaders in silence and at the same time their latest drive generations (WDxxxxAAxx and T166) are offering very strong performance, too. The performance of their 320/400/500GB models is really much better than of your older Samsung. At least in benchmarking you can see almost up to double speed(effect) in some benchmarks. But of course for average user scenarions the advantage isn't so big, in many applications you hardly will notice it.

After reading an article at Tom's hardware, I'm a bit more confused. They are calling the WD1600AAJS a "great OS drive" because it has a high STR. Yet in their own "Windows boot time" benchmark, this very drive scores in the bottom half of the table, behind the higher capacity drives with supposedly worse STR.

To me, that either means loading Windows, games and apps doesn't rely much on STR, or that some other factor is more important - access time perhaps? The WD1600AAJS had a mediocre access time compared to other models.

Now where this matters to me is online gaming. In single player games, I couldn't really care how long it takes to load a level. In MMORPGs, however, the game is still 'active' while your PC is loading textures and other bits. This is especially relevant now that MMOs are adopting the so-called "seamless" loading of world details. Every so often, the hard drive is accessed to load the next part of the map before you cross over into it.

So this "seamless" loading, would you say that is affected by STR or by something else? Again, I notice that the T166 features high STR and poor access times, and also didn't score highly in Tom's "Windows boot speed" test.

Confused? Not arf!

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A 5400rpm drive? Any modern 7200rpm unit should be a substantial performance improvement for you. Very few drives today are straight up loud, so I would buy without worrying about noise.

If you are concerned about noise more than performance I believe the latest Samsungs are pretty good, but the difference isn't huge between them and their closest competition.

I would agree about that. Especially compared to ball bearing drives, every single modern FDB drive is quieter than every single BB drive, I would hazard to guess.

Seek noise is a toss-up, even among drives from the same manufacturer. Samsung seems to always be up there in quiet seeks, same with Western Digital. If I recall, lately, Seagate and Hitachi have had noisier seeks than Samsung or WD.

Of course it also depends if seek noise bothers you. I know it bothers many people, but somehow I don't notice it/don't mind it.

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Guest 888
To me, that either means loading Windows, games and apps doesn't rely much on STR, or that some other factor is more important - access time perhaps? The WD1600AAJS had a mediocre access time compared to other models.

[...]

So this "seamless" loading, would you say that is affected by STR or by something else? Again, I notice that the T166 features high STR and poor access times, and also didn't score highly in Tom's "Windows boot speed" test.

The drive's firmware optimization plays the key role in drive's real application performance. Hitachi's are a good example in it - their latest generation has the slowest STR among current 160GB-per-platter generation drives of every manufacturer and even their seek time is 1ms slower than for earlier Hitachis but they still perform the best...

I think the Hitachis are just the best 7200rpm drives for gamers. But you wanted a quiet drive. Hitachis aren't that...

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If you want quiet and fast:

use 2.5 inch drives.

They have excellent performance beacuse the high density on the drives.

Put 2 160gigs drives in a stripe = excellent.

Power consumtion on a 2.5 inch drive is really low. Idle about 1 watt and active 7-8watt. That is much less to cool then those noisy 3.5 drives.

3.5 drives are only if you need massive space (ie more then 500 gig) and if you don't want to pay the pricepremium for 2.5 discs.

///Kind regards

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