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Newbie Question: Best 250 SATA II Drive

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Hi folks,

I was hoping to get some information on what the best choices in the 250g SATA's are right now. Usually I get most of my tech info from Tom's Hardware, but they haven't had any good articles on hard drives in awhile so I'm feeling behind.

Some techology that I don't fully understand yet are the NCQ Drives, and Perpandicular drives.

For example, the drive highest on my list right now is the ST3250620AS, because it uses the newer perpandicular technology (admittedly I don't know the pros and cons), however I'm not sure if it has NCQ. Also on my list is the 7200.9 ST3250824AS, which has NCQ for sure. Are the 7200.9's older than the 7200.10's?

The NL-35 ST3250624NS also comes in a 250 SATA II, but I have no idea what the pros and cons of this drive are.

Seagate alone has about 10 other 250g SATA II's and I'm lost. Can't seem to figure out what differentiates the models.

Anyone have any advice?

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Guest 888

If to take just Seagate and just 250GB then the newest 7200.10 (ST3250620AS) and its enterprise companion ES (ST3250620NS) are the only relatively good performers today. Although 7200.9 or NL35.2 250GB is better because of it is a basic model in its series (utilizes full platters and paired heads). Real reliability is "this and thus".

Of 250GB models another strong performer (probably the overally best performer) is Hitachi T7K250. Also Hitachi T7K500 250GB is very similar in performance.

But if you need the most quiet 250GB then WD2500 series are the safe choice. Their raw speed is slower but good firmware makes this thing almost unnoticeable.

* You do not need NCQ if you are not building a front-end high-load server.

* Perpendicular recording techology gives more dense platters and so also more capacity and more raw speed but nothing more. The seek times and firmware optimizations are more essential in most usage scenarios (raw speed in home computer is useful only in video editing and multichannel audio recording).

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If to take just Seagate and just 250GB then the newest 7200.10 (ST3250620AS) and its enterprise companion ES (ST3250620NS) are the only relatively good performers today. Although 7200.9 or NL35.2 250GB is better because of it is a basic model in its series (utilizes full platters and paired heads). Real reliability is "this and thus".

Of 250GB models another strong performer (probably the overally best performer) is Hitachi T7K250. Also Hitachi T7K500 250GB is very similar in performance.

But if you need the most quiet 250GB then WD2500 series are the safe choice. Their raw speed is slower but good firmware makes this thing almost unnoticeable.

* You do not need NCQ if you are not building a front-end high-load server.

* Perpendicular recording techology gives more dense platters and so also more capacity and more raw speed but nothing more. The seek times and firmware optimizations are more essential in most usage scenarios (raw speed in home computer is useful only in video editing and multichannel audio recording).

Hey thanks. Care to give me a quick run down on perpandicular technology and NCQ? I know that perpandicular drives will allow much higher storage numbers, but for a given storage number is there any significant difference?

(Thanks for mentioning the Hitachi, i'm not stuck on Seagate, they're just the brand I'm most familliar with. I've actually never had a Hitachi)

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Oh... heh, sorry I somehow glanced over your last part.

Yeah I'm not building a server, just a nice Gaming/all around Desktop. I plan on using a Hybrid or Hardware RAID 1 for simple backup and better read times.

In fact, read times pretty much are my priority. I don't do a ton of writing and not much video editing or anything like that, but I loved my old RAID 1 and the fact that I can load into a game in almost 1/2 the time, plus it just seems to make things easier for backups and reinstalls.

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Usually I get most of my tech info from Tom's Hardware, but they haven't had any good articles on hard drives...

Your sentence would have been just fine if it would have ended after "articles".

Regarding the main topic of this thread, all of your interrogations should be answered in the following drive roundup :

Not much has changed since then and Oceanfence's 7200.10 isn't any better than other models with a quarter-gig capacity.

There's been a few other articles published on this very website that are worth (mandatory) reading for newcomers.

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Oh... heh, sorry I somehow glanced over your last part.

Yeah I'm not building a server, just a nice Gaming/all around Desktop. I plan on using a Hybrid or Hardware RAID 1 for simple backup and better read times.

In fact, read times pretty much are my priority. I don't do a ton of writing and not much video editing or anything like that, but I loved my old RAID 1 and the fact that I can load into a game in almost 1/2 the time, plus it just seems to make things easier for backups and reinstalls.

Be careful with assuming Raid 1 improves read times, from what I've learned recently not all controllers can accomplish this. i.e. reading simultaneously at different positions

If anyone knows of a modern controller that can do this for sure, please by all means say-so.

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Be careful with assuming Raid 1 improves read times, from what I've learned recently not all controllers can accomplish this. i.e. reading simultaneously at different positions

If anyone knows of a modern controller that can do this for sure, please by all means say-so.

Is it a money-is-no-object question?

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Some of the new "cheap" HPT adapters have some level of RAID1 parallelization. Even linux DMRAID does a decent job. Unfortunately, all the available benchmarks on the web always go for 0+1 or RAID 5, making it difficult to see if the feature is incorporated. I would e-mail the MFR of the adapter prior to purchasing. I wish there were a site somewhere that would do in depth reviews of consumer storage subsystem components.

Frank

The last line was meant to be a joke BTW.

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