Joku_

Is Raptor going to become obsolete in the next 2-3 years?

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I have been wondering if I should get a 150GB Raptor or a 400GB 7200rpm drive as a boot drive. But apparently there are new solid state drives coming on the market that have superior access times when compared to any HDD. So is it worth it to get a Raptor as there is a risk that it might become completely obsolete as a high-performance drive in the next 2-3 years?

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I have been wondering if I should get a 150GB Raptor or a 400GB 7200rpm drive as a boot drive. But apparently there are new solid state drives coming on the market that have superior access times when compared to any HDD. So is it worth it to get a Raptor as there is a risk that it might become completely obsolete as a high-performance drive in the next 2-3 years?

Tech always advances, there will be several product cycles in 2-3 years and you will want every single one of them. Buy what you want now, because you want the new thing anyway.

plus, in 2-3 years your 400gb would be dwarfed by 2-5TB drives, so buying 400gb would be silly if you use the same logic as not buying a raptor ;)

I don't know what you store on your computer, but 150gb wouldnt be enough for me. I have a raptor 74 for boot that im happy with and several large drives for general storage.

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Im not really worried of the usual advancement of tech, but Im worried if within 2 years there will be ~100GB solid state drives with 1μs acces times and 300MB/s transfer rates or something..

Yes, 150GB wouldn't be enough for me either, but I have already 900GB of hard disk space and I would get the Raptor for boot drive. Im not just sure if 74GB is big enough even for a boot drive (I have currently 72GB of stuff in my boot partition, and I don't use it for storage). :)

Edited by Joku_

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Lets say in 2 years they come out with such a drive. It will likely cost $1K - $2K for a 100GB drive. It would likely be several years before it become cost effective for the general market. With that kind of timespan I suspect that you would be considered replacing a drive like a Raptor before then.

Right now you can get compact flash based memory, with its inherent limitations, for around $400 for a 8GB module. Even with a significant breakthrough of some sort it will be years before a typical consumer is going to have access to much better.

Such a product would likely be released for the enterprise market first. For a personal machine I would only worry if a product had already been announced.

Im not really worried of the usual advancement of tech, but Im worried if within 2 years there will be ~100GB solid state drives with 1μs acces times and 300MB/s transfer rates or something..

Yes, 150GB wouldn't be enough for me either, but I have already 900GB of hard disk space and I would get the Raptor for boot drive. Im not just sure if 74GB is big enough even for a boot drive (I have currently 72GB of stuff in my boot partition, and I don't use it for storage). :)

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Long answer short, no.

100MB/sec off of a flash drive is still pretty low, considering how close old-fashioned rotating media is to that mark now. ;)

Yes, 100MB/s isn't that much faster than normal hard disks, but wouldn't the radically better acces times make a huge increase in performance?

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I wonder if a solid state drive with performance like this would trounce a Raptor..

http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=3419

And this tells something about flash drives that will have three times the current transfer rates.. around 100MB/s.

http://uk.theinquirer.net/?article=33030

If we believe Samsumg's extreme optimism, then next year we will have expensive 128GB SSD will STR's equivalent to next year's 7.2k laptop perp. rec. 160GB drives. For the desktop usage, power saving is irrelevant- in the laptop, HDD use no more than 3 watts, so savings are not great, CPU, GPU, LCD screen using lion's share of battery power.

So, maybe, when Samsung get's 20nm process in full production, you'll see 512GB SDD, but when?

More likely in the near term, hybrid drives will be the hot ticket for desktop (I read various estimates of 10% greater price for 256MB versions), with Samsung claiming 4GB hybrid (considering cost is not that high, looking at new iPod's, you'd think 4GB hybrid's would become standard by end of year 2007?)

http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/storage/displ...0727213045.html

2-3 years is a long time in the storage world ;). Maybe by then we'll have another contender.

MRAM (but considering how lame Freescale was at delivering speed increases for the Apple laptop line before the switch to Intel, I have my doubts about any timely/useful for consumer products, Freescale could deliver)

http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/memory/displa...0711035234.html

Samsung already has the 32GB drive in one of their laptops on sale since this summer.

But they are pretty expensive for early adopters, at least until more vendors are offering them. I'd wait for the charge trap tech. chips to appear next year, more reliable, faster, higher capacity...and probably less expensive by a factor of ???

Anyone for a $1800+ 64GB SSD? ;-), care to post you experiences on SR?

http://www.dvnation.com/ssd.html

I disagree with continuum, 100MB/sec STR is only being currently set by the fastest 15k rpm drives, which aren't exactly inexpensive either. Still with 1TB SATA drives on the horizon, expect them to hit near 100MB/sec. But no HDD can match the access times, which are more important to making for a frickin fast 'feel' to system response. You could raid both HDD & SDD for faster STR's if you need that for HD video editing/capture or other high STR intensive uses.

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0.6ms isn't anywhere close to 1ns...

http://www.techreport.com/reviews/2006q3/s...e/index.x?pg=12

I wouldn't worry about flash completely eclipsing rotional media anytime soon-- at least if you define soon as 2-3 years.

Typical HDD biased (like Eugene ;) ) sentiments...always quoting the latest...obsolete tech, lol. That link is to an antiquated slowpoke of a drive, yeah it's lame, but so are older 15k HDD's compare to all but latest laptop drives (heck, perp. tech 7.2k laptop drives, due out 1st Q 2007 will outperform older 15k HDD's in some parameters, so what's the point of bringing up older, obsolete technology???)

Samsung's 32GB laptop replacement for laptop drives, is faster in STR than all but the Hitachi 7.2k Travelstar. Newer/faster/less expensive CTF tech SDD will replace rotational media soon I am sure, maybe in the next 2-3 years, for many laptop applications (pro users will probably want the higher capacity HDD solutions in the near term).

http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2006/05/23/sa...ship_flash_pcs/

"With a 53MBps read speed and a 28MBps write rate, the SSD allows Windows XP to boot up in half or even a quarter of the time it would take on a regular system, Samsung claimed. Both devices are completely silent, it said, compared to HDD-based models, which generate around 30dB of noise.

The SSD is a 2.5in form-factor product that operates at 5V and connects across a 66MHz Ultra DMA parallel ATA bus. Samsung said the unit consumes just five per cent of the energy it takes to run a hard drive.

The downside, of course, is the cost, but in compensation Samsung is building digital TV receivers into each machine to "bring extra enjoyment to users during this summer's World Cup competition", it said.

Samsung last week demo'd its latest hybrid drive - a unit that combines a Flash cache with a regular HDD. While the hybrid will offer higher storage capacities than the SSD, and at a lower cost, it requires Windows Vista's ReadyDrive feature to operate so it's unlikely to make it into commercially available PCs until early next year. "

Link above, in prior post, promises SATA version available Oct. 2006

Wonder if Apple will offer a slimmed down (size & weight) version of one of these bemouth 19/20in HiDef Blu-ray DVD monsters, next year, with twin RAID 0 128GB SSD's ;-)

http://www.engadget.com/2006/06/08/acer-as...vd-in-the-wild/

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Have you ever heard of Ebay? Buy the Raptor NOW, use it, and if the SSD disks are as good as they are made out to be when they get launched, then sell the Raptor on ebay and get the SSD. Simple and sweet. Do not torture yourself by trying to predict the future. It is not worth the effort. Get things that are available NOW.

I sold a couple of HDD's on ebay... you will get good prices on them.

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Have you ever heard of Ebay? Buy the Raptor NOW, use it, and if fast SSD disks that are in the pipeline are as good as they are made out to be when they get launched, then sell the Raptor on ebay and get the SSD. Simple and sweet. Do not torture yourself by trying to predict the future. It is not worth the effort. Get things that are available NOW.

I sold a couple of HDD's on ebay... you will get good prices on them.

The currently available SSD disks all have lower data throughput rates than the Raptors, and I would guess are much slower, more expensive, and only suited to specialist applications where heat and shock resistance become important factors. If they were faster than Raptors, they would have a lot more buzz on the net, especially in gaming sites.

Edited by student

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